Roundup: Alaska’s Heat Wave, Black Carbon in Tibet, and Artwork at The Met

Heat Wave in Alaska Results in Record Temperatures, Wildfires, and Glacial Melt

From Yereth Rosen at Reuters: “Alaska’s heat wave is driving wildfires and melting glaciers, choking the state’s biggest cities with smoke and bloating rivers with meltwater. Melting glaciers and mountain snowfields are bloating rivers and streams across a large swath of south central Alaska, the [National Weather Service] said. The melt has brought water levels to flood stage at the Yentna River northwest of Anchorage on [June 30].”

Read the full story here.

Recorded water levels at Yentna River, Alaska (Source: NOAA/National Weather Service)

Black Carbon Measured in the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau

From Science of the Total Environment: “Black carbon (BC), which consists of the strongest light-absorbing particles (LAP) in snow/ice, has been regarded as a potential factor accelerating the melting of glaciers and snow cover over the Third Pole. During the winter and summer of 2016, snow, ice and topsoil were sampled from the Laohugou basin located on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau. Concentrations of BC in Laohugou Glacier No. 12 (LG12) and snow cover in this basin.”

Read more about the research study here.

Eastern Tibetan Plateau (Source: Nicolas Marino, Flickr)

Contemporary Artwork at the Metropolitan Museum of Art Features Icelandic Artist Ragnar Kjartansson

From The Met: “As part of a new series of contemporary installations, The Met presents the world premiere of a major new work: Death Is Elsewhere (2019), a seven-channel video installation by the acclaimed Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson. Provocatively rethinking the possibilities for performance and video art, Kjartansson makes work in which he simultaneously evokes Romantic clichés while using irony, nihilism, and absurdity to undermine them.”

Read the full exhibition overview here.

Contemporary art installations featuring Ragnar Kjartansson (Source: The Met)

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