Roundup: Crack, Flood, Fight

Petermann Crack Develops

From Grist: “Petermann is one of the largest and most important glaciers in the world, with a direct connection to the core of the Greenland ice sheet. That means that even though this week’s new iceberg at Petermann is just 1/500th the size of the massive one that broke off the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica earlier this month, it could eventually have a much bigger effect on global sea levels. Scientists believe that if Petermann collapses completely, it could raise the seas by about a foot.”

Read more about the potential collapse of the Petermann here.

A satellite image from April 2017 shows existing and new cracks in the Petermann Glacier (Source: NASA).

 

Glacial Outburst Flood Rages in Iceland

From The Watchers: “A glacial outburst flood started in Iceland’s Múlakvísl river around midnight UTC on July 29, 2017. Electrical conductivity is now measured around 580µS/cm and has increased rapidly the last hour, Icelandic Met Office (IMO) reported 10:14 UTC on July 29. Increasing water levels of this river are an important indicator of Katla’s upcoming volcanic eruptions.”

Read about safety concerns associated with the flood here.

The Múlakvísl River appeared serene the day before the July 29 outburst flood (Source: Icelandic Met Office).

 

Conflict in the Himalayas

From The New York Times: “The road stands on territory at the point where China, India and Bhutan meet…The standoff began last month when Bhutan, a close ally of India, discovered Chinese workers trying to extend the road. Now soldiers from the two powers are squaring off, separated by only a few hundred feet. The conflict shows no sign of abating, and it reflects the swelling ambition— and nationalism— of both countries. Each is governed by a muscular leader eager to bolster his domestic standing while asserting his country’s place on the world stage as the United States recedes from a leading role.”

Learn more about the geopolitics of this standoff here.

A border post in Nathula, a mountain pass in the Himalayas that connects Sikkim and Tibet (Source: Indrajit Das/Wikimedia Commons).

 

Roundup: A Mountainous Geopolitical Stage 

Controversial World Heritage Site Proclaimed

From the Japan Times: “A handful of pro-Tibet activists protested earlier this week while the International Campaign for Tibet (ICT) advocacy group warned that giving Hoh Xil heritage status could have consequences for Tibet.”

Read more about the controversy around one of the newest UNESCO World Heritage Sites here.

Qinghai Hoh Xil is home to Bukedaban Glacier, which is underlain by boiling springs (Source: Wikimedia Commons).

 

Indian Pilgrims Stalled in the Mountains

From The Economic Times: “China accused Indian troops of ‘crossing the boundary’ in the Sikkim sector and put their immediate withdrawal as condition to reopen the Nathu La Pass for Indian pilgrims traveling to Kailash Mansarovar.”

Read more about the impasse here.
China has blocked pilgrims from crossing the Nathu La pass in Sikkim (Source: Ananth Krishnan/Twitter).

 

Himalayan Border Dispute

From the Hindustan Times: “China on Friday accused India of ‘ulterior motives’ in claiming the entire Doklam or Donglang region as part of the tri-junction with Bhutan, saying New Delhi’s stance went against its acceptance of a British-era convention on national boundaries in the area.”

Read more about the Sikkim standoff here.

India and China are in a standoff over the mountainous Sikkim sector (Source: Soumyajit Pramanick/Wikimedia Commons).

 

Roundup: The Godfather of Modern Ecology and China

A Hundred Years of Data

From National Geographic: “It’s not often an ecologist gets to play sleuth in so adventurous a fashion— picking through musty papers in the Midwest for 100-year-old hand-drawn maps that lead through dense Alaskan underbrush populated by wolves and brown bears. But that’s how scientist Brian Buma tracked down the work of a legend— a godfather of modern ecology so prominent in his field that the Ecological Society of America has an award named after him.”

Read more about Buma’s trekking and his findings here.

When William Cooper visited in 1916, this bay was filled with glacier ice (Source: Brian Buma).

 

All Not Quiet on the Western Front

From the BBC: “China has accused India of incursion into its territory between Sikkim and Tibet, in a dispute which has raised tensions between the countries. Officials said Indian border guards had obstructed “normal activities” on the Chinese side, and called on India to immediately withdraw them. India also recently accused Chinese troops of incursion on its side.”

Read more about this geopolitical hotspot here.

The entrance to the Nathu La pass, between India and China (source: Abhishek Kumar/Creative Commons).

On the Tibetan Plateau…

From the Chinese Academy of Sciences: “China on Saturday began its second scientific expedition to the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau to study changes in climate, biodiversity and environment over the past decades. The expedition will last five to 10 years and the first stop will be Serling Tso, a 2,391-square-kilometer lake that was confirmed to have replaced the Buddhist holy lake Namtso as Tibet’s largest in 2014.”

Read more about the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ upcoming research project here.

Satellite image of the Serling Tso lake (source: NASA/Creative Commons).