Photo Friday: Exploring Antarctica

The United States Antarctic Program houses a comprehensive photo library containing more than five hundred photos of Antarctica’s glaciers and icesheets, allowing the public to explore the continent’s unique ecology and ice-covered landscape. Enjoy the photos below.

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The second photo showcases Blood Falls at the terminus of Taylor Glacier. To learn more about the scientific process behind the glacial tounge’s vibrant coloring, check out this past GlacierHub article on Blood Falls.

Many thanks to Peter Rejcek and the National Science Foundation for allowing us to use these photos.

Photo Friday: The Dry Valleys of Antarctica

The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) houses an excellent Glacier Photograph Collection, including a special collection of photos of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, a row of snow-free valleys in Antartica. However, that doesn’t stop from glaciers from entering into the picture.

About dry valleys and the MucMurdo Dry Valley photo collection, the NSIDC comments:

“While the valleys themselves are notably ice-free, a number of glaciers terminate in the valleys, some acting as outlets to the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Studies show that the majority of the glaciers in this area are receding. Glaciers were photographed in the course of geologic studies and help document the conditions of the glaciers and how they may have changed.”

Enjoy some of the photos below.

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To view the rest of the collection, click here.

Many thanks to NSIDC and its Glacier Photograph Collection for the use of these photos. These photos are held by the Data Conservancy at Johns Hopkins University.  Please contact Keith Kaneda for further questions about the collection.

Photo Friday: Exploring Mount Shuksan

Mount Shuksan, a glaciated peak in the North Cascades National Park of Washington state, is perhaps one of the most heavily photographed mountains in the world. The mountain’s name, Shuksan, is derived from the Lummi word meaning “high peak–” these photos below show why.

Emily from Barnstorming, a wife, mother, farmer and family physician living in rural northwest Washington, shared some of her photos of Mount Shuksan and neighboring Mount Baker, from a recent trip to the North Cascades.

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Check out this past Photo Friday from Glacierhub to view some of Emily’s other photos of the North Cascades region.

Photo Friday: Images from an Andean Expedition

Gustavo Valdivia, an anthropology PhD student at Johns Hopkins University, as well as a former contributor to GlacierHub, went on an expedition to Quelccaya Glacier in the Peruvian Andes this summer, led by the prominent glaciologist Lonnie Thompson. In a recent email to GlacierHub, he wrote, “In these photos, I try to document the way that a major scientific team interacts with a very specific place–the melting ice of Quelccaya, which is a component of the complex Andean mountain environment–in order to produce knowledge about a global phenomenon–climate. The fact that Quelccaya is retreating so rapidly gives urgency to their research and to my photos.”

Gustavo joined the expedition as part of his dissertation research, in which he plans to investigate how the Andes mountains are represented in the field of climate science and the degree of understanding about climate and climate change in local Andean communities. You can read more about his work here.

Many thanks to Gustavo for sharing some of his expedition photos with us:  [slideshow_deploy id=’6016′]

Salvage Science: Climate Change and Paleo-glaciology in an Andean Glacier

Explaining the expedition more fully, Gustavo writes:

In the summer of 2015 I joined Lonnie Thompson and his team from the Byrd Polar Research Center of The Ohio State University, in their expedition to the Quelccaya, the largest tropical glacier in the world, located in the Peruvian Andes. My interest to join this expedition as an anthropologist was quite simple: to produce an ethnographically grounded account of the process through which ice obtained from this glacier is processed, documented and made available for the ends of scientific climate research. To this end, I wanted to explore the methods of observation and reflection, sensing technologies, epistemological assumptions, and field practices of this very influential climate research team. Once in Quelccaya, however, I started to understand better that this team’s practices of investigation and experimentation, required much more than just their passive submission to the rigorous dictates of the so-called “scientific method”. On the contrary, the forms of scientific knowledge production that were shaped in the interaction with the melting ice of this glacier, and the complexities of the Andean environment; had to do with both scientific cultivated dispositions but also with sensory intuitions, passion and imagination.

Gustavo wrote a previous article for GlacierHub in 2014 in which he documented a summer trip to Quelccaya. During this expedition, he and an experimental musician recorded the sounds of the glacier’s ice as it melted, which you can listen to here.

 

Photo Friday: Through the Lens of a Tajikistani Glaciologist

Earth scientists and glaciologists often have the opportunity to explore and witness Earth’s glaciers and geological landscapes through fieldwork. This Tajikistani glaciologist, Dr. Farshed Karimov, a professor at the National University of Tajikistan, recently published a presentation on glacial dynamic modelling. In it, he included stunning photos from his travels, mainly of the Pamir Mountains, a mountain range in Central Asia at the junction of the Himalayas.

We’ve excerpted a few of Karimov’s photos below.

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To access Dr. Karimov’s presentation on glacial dynamic modelling or to contact him for more information, please email fhkarim@mail.tj.