Roundup: Effects of High Latitude Dust, The First Proglacial Sediment Inventory, Glaciers and New Zealand’s Paleoclimate

The Effects of High Latitude Dust on Arctic Atmosphere

Science Reports published a study on November 6, which profiles the vertical distribution of dusts in the Arctic atmosphere. Read the full study here. From the abstract:

“High Latitude Dust (HLD) contributes 5% to the global dust budget, but HLD measurements are sparse. Dust observations from Iceland provide dust aerosol distributions during the Arctic winter for the first time, profiling dust storms as well as clean air conditions. Five winter dust storms were captured during harsh conditions…Dust sources in the Arctic are active during the winter and produce large amounts of particulate matter dispersed over long distances and high altitudes. HLD contributes to Arctic air pollution and has the potential to influence ice nucleation in mixed-phase clouds and Arctic amplification.”

For more on high latitude dust impacts on GlacierHub, read How Dust From Receding Glaciers Is Affecting the Climate.

Launch of LOAC during strong winds in Hvalfjordur bay, West Iceland, on 12th January 2016 (Source RAX/Ragnar Axelsson).

The First Proglacial River Sediment Inventory

Sediments are being exposed as glaciers retreat, making proglacial rivers one of the most sediment-rich areas in the world. From the abstract of a study published in the 2019 book Geomorphology of Proglacial Systems:

“Deglaciation since the Little Ice Age has exposed only a small areal proportion of alpine catchments, but these proglacial systems are disproportionately important as sediment sources. Indeed sediment yields from proglacial rivers are amongst the highest measured anywhere in the World. Motivated by a desire to understand where exactly within catchments this sediment is coming from and how it might evolve, this chapter presents the first digital inventories of proglacial systems and the first comparative inter- and intra-catchment comparison of their geometry, topography and geomorphology.”

The e-book by Springer is available here.

Tasman River between Tasman Lake (proglacial) and Lake Pukaki in the distance (Source: Fabian Rindler/WikiCommons).

Glacier Fluctuations Key to New Zealand Paleoclimate Record

A new study, published in Science Direct on November 1, traces the fluctuations in some New Zealand glaciers over the last 10,000-plus years, showing the significance for contemporary issues of climate change. From the abstract:

“Geological records of past glacier extent can yield important constraints on the timing and magnitude of pre-historic climate change. Here we present a cosmogenic Helium-3 moraine chronology from Mt. Ruapehu in central North Island, New Zealand that records fluctuations of New Zealand’s northernmost glaciers over the last 14,000 years.”

Read the full study here.

The upper southern flank of Mt. Ruapehu with cosmogenic Helium-3 exposure ages on moraines in the foreland of Mangaehuehu Glacier (Source: Eaves et al/Science Direct).

Read More on GlacierHub:

Photo Friday: GIF Shows Dramatic Reduction of Gergeti Glacier, Georgia

Mountain Summit Issues Call for Action on Climate Change

Video of the Week: Hellish Bike Race Down French Alpine Glacier

Roundup: Ice Sheets, Cryoconite Holes and Turbulent Heat Fluxes

Late Quaternary Meltwater Pulses and Sea Level Change

From Journal of Quaternary Science: “After the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) global mean sea level (GMSL) rise was characterized by rapid increases over short (decadal to centennial) timescales superimposed on a longer term secular rise and these have been termed meltwater pulses (MWPs). In this paper we review the timing, impact and nature of these and the effects of rapid drainage of large post‐glacial MWPs into the world’s oceans. We show that drainage of the known post‐glacial lakes in total produced less than around 1.2 m of the 125 m of GMSLR since the LGM.”

Read more about the article here.

Location of the Last Glacial Maximum and Lateglacial lakes (Source: Stephan Harrison, David E. Smith, Neil F. Glasser).

 

Island Biogeography of Cryoconite Hole Bacteria in Antarctica

From Frontier in Ecology and Evolution: “Cryoconite holes are holes in a glacier’s surface caused by sediment melting into the glacier. These holes are self-contained ecosystems that include abundant bacterial life within their sediment and liquid water, and have recently gained the attention of microbial ecologists looking to use cryoconite holes as “natural microcosms” to study microbial community assembly. This article applies models of island ecosystems to these holes because they are very much like islands in the sea, surrounded by a barrier to entry. ”

Read the details of the paper here.

Cryoconite Holes (Source: Alan Grinberg/Flickr).

 

Turbulent Heat Fluxes in Qilian Mountains, China

From JGR Atmospheres:” A study of using the bulk method to quantify the turbulent air flow and sublimation/condensation over glacier in August-One Glacier, Qilian Mountains, China. This article addresses the patterns of warming at different wind speeds. We tried to acquire reliable varying and intrinsic aerodynamic roughness length for momentum through its parametric analysis.”
For more details, click here.

Eight-One Glacier (Source: Yen L./Flickr).

 

 

 

 

Are glaciers behind perplexing shift in paleoclimate Ice Age patterns?

In early August, at the Goldschmidt Conference on geochemistry, a team of scientists from Columbia University presented evidence from seafloor cores that suggest that a million years ago ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere began sticking to their bedrock. The team proposes that as the glaciers grew thicker, it led to a global cooling that disrupted both the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and the ice age cycle. But how exactly might glaciers have been involved in this perplexing shift in paleoclimate ice age patterns?

As skeptics of anthropogenic climate change often note, Earth’s climate changes and has changed before. Aside from humans’ unabashed consumption of greenhouse gases, a wide variety of natural factors cause shifts in this complex system. For instance, scientists have long acknowledged how tiny changes in the Earth’s orbit around the sun, collectively known as the Milankovitch Cycles, drive the coming and going of ice ages. As the Milankovitch Cycles interact, the planet’s movements displace the incoming solar radiation across the globe, dramatically affecting the Earth’s climate system and the advancement and retreat of glaciers.

Glaciers in the North Atlantic, such as this one in the Johan Petersen Fjord of eastern Greenland, may have driven a global cooling a million years ago (Source: Ray Swi-hymn/Flickr).

For a while, ice ages were known to occur steadily every 40,000 years. However, a million years ago, that metronome inexplicably got off course. Instead of periods of intense glaciation occurring every 40,000 years, it shifted to every 100,000 years. But the likely culprit, the Milankovitch Cycles, hadn’t changed a million years ago. It didn’t add up.

And that’s not all. Around the same time, the massive AMOC— the conveyor belt that brings warm, shallow water to the North Atlantic, where it cools and sinks to the sea floor before returning south— nearly collapsed. Were these events related? If so, how and what was behind them?

These questions have perplexed scientists for years, as was apparent even at last month’s conference. But through an analysis of the chemical composition of basin-wide ocean sediment cores over several years, geochemist Steve Goldstein from Columbia University, who led the study presented at Goldschmidt, found unique shifts in isotopic signals that reflect a slower turn of the AMOC 950,000 years ago. 

For the present study, the team examined five more ocean cores, in addition to two analyzed earlier in the decade, that also demonstrated signs of a weak AMOC. The group believes two of the cores from the North Atlantic indicate possible triggers for the AMOC crisis. They suggest that such a slowdown could have rapidly cooled the North Atlantic region, in turn lengthening the ice age rhythm.

Peter Clark, a glaciologist at Oregon State University in Corvallis, has advanced this hypothesis as the only plausible explanation for many years, wrote Paul Voosen in Science last month. Three million years ago, a sustained warming period allowed for the build-up of thick soil in the Northern Hemisphere. Ice sheets would often collapse as the soil acted as an oiled buffer. But repeated glaciations wore down the warm protective layer and enabled glaciers to dig deeper into older rock that stabilized them and helped them thicken and advance.

Aerial shot of a large glacier in Greenland (Source: Leon Weber/Flickr).

But as exciting as the findings may be, not everyone is sold on the hypothesis. Climate scientist Amy Clement from the University of Miami told GlacierHub it sounded like an interesting concept, but she has problems with how the AMOC idea is applied in the modern climate. Clement explains how some argue that variations in the AMOC strength control the North Atlantic surface temperature on these multi-decadal timescales.

“The problems are (1) timescale and (2) magnitude. On these short timescales, the AMOC doesn’t seem to be the driver,” she noted to GlacierHub. “Instead we think the North Atlantic surface temperatures are controlled by external forcing (some natural, such as the sun and volcanoes) and some anthropogenic (such as greenhouse gases and aerosols).”

Others including Henrieka Detlef, a paleoclimatologist at Cardiff University in the U.K., told Science that while she accepts something important happened in the North Atlantic to lead to AMOC crisis, she has yet to see conclusive evidence that northern ice sheets were increasing in thickness prior to the AMOC slowdown.

Still, most agree that ice age rhythm shifts were likely caused by more than one trigger. The Columbia team is confident that thickening ice sheets in addition to other factors played a role in the perplexing transition. “The interactions between the different components of the Earth’s climate are elusive, but understanding them is crucial for reconstructing past changes,” Maayan Yehudai, part of the research group and a graduate student at Columbia, told GlacierHub. “We still have a long way to go as scientists before we can characterize them perfectly, but I think this is another important step forward on this account.”