Photo Friday: Nelly Elagina’s View of Mount Elbrus

Among the Caucasus Mountains, on the edge of Russia’s border with Georgia, sits the perennially snow-covered peak of Mount Elbrus, rising to a height of 5,642 meters and holding the title of tallest summit on the European continent. It is home to not one, but two summits, both of which are dormant volcanic domes, and 22 glaciers that feed three different rivers: the Baksan, Kuban, and Malka. The area of its glaciers decreased 14.8 percent during the first half of the 20th century and 6.28 percent during the second half, according to a report by the Russian Academy of Sciences National Geophysical Committee.

Despite its gradually melting glaciers, Mount Elbrus is frequented by climbers because of its status as one of the Seven Summits. The Seven Summits are the highest mountains on each of the seven continents and some serious climbers set out to summit them all. As such, it is a popular destination, but also a rather perilous one: 15-30 climbers die each year seeking to reach the summit, sometimes due to the region’s unpredictable weather.

The stunning wisps of clouds looping around the dark rock formations that peek out of their snowy coverings and the expansive views that can be seen from the mountain are captured by photographer Nelly Elagina. Her images convey a feeling of wonder and excitement that may explain why climbers are drawn to Mount Elbrus. Elagina is a researcher in the department of glaciology at the Russian Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Geography.

All images were taken by Nelly Elagina. You can find her on Instagram here.

Read More on GlacierHub:

The Impact of the GRACE Mission on Glaciology and Climate Science

How Dust From Receding Glaciers Is Affecting the Climate

New Weather Stations Aid Denali Researchers and Climbers

Please follow, share and like us:
error