Video of the Week: ICESat-2 Scans Glaciated Volcanoes in the Pacific Northwest

In this week’s Video of the Week, Polar Science Center glaciologist Ben Smith shares results from NASA’s new polar satellite, ICESat-2, which made a pass over two glaciated volcanoes in the Pacific Northwest; Mount Baker and Mount Adams. The satellite, which launched in September 2018, carries a laser altimeter that detects individual photons, allowing scientists to measure the elevation of ice sheets, sea ice, forests and more in unprecedented detail. Smith, who is also a professor at the University of Washington, said it will be a few years before the polar orbiting satellite passes over the region, providing an opportunity to measure the glaciers’ change in surface altitude again.

Read More On GlacierHub:

ICESat-2 Hackweek Tackles the Big Data of Earth’s Glaciers

Photo Friday: Mount Baker Is Letting Off Some Steam

Video of the Week: Take a 360° Tour of Mount Baker

Photo Friday: Glaciers in Twilight

On July 27, night-gazers rejoiced in watching the full moon, which also presented the longest total lunar eclipse of the 21st century. The total phase of the eclipse lasted 1 hour 42 minutes and 57 seconds, eclipsing January 2018’s total lunar eclipse by approximately 26 minutes. The waning gibbous phase of the moon can be seen this week as a daytime moon.

This Photo Friday, enjoy the beauty of the moon rising over glacier-covered mountains in the Cascades during the daytime. The Cascade range extends from southern British Columbia through the states of Washington, Oregon and Northern California. It includes both non-volcanic mountains as well as glaciated volcanic mountains such as Mt Adams.

Daytime moon over Mt. Adams during sunrise (Source: Jeff Hagan/Earth Sky).

 

Daytime moon during sunset at Mount Rainer (Source: Max Pixel).

 

Moon rising over Mount Baker during Sunset (Source: Briarcroft.wordpress).

 

Sunset at Mount Shasta in California with daytime moon (Source: Jeff Hollett/Flickr).

 

Moon and Mt. Hood as seen from Hillsboro, Oregon (Source: M. O. Stevens/WikiCommons)

Photo Friday: Mount Adams

Mount Adams, the second highest mountain in the U.S. state of Washington, is a potentially active volcano in the Cascade Range. Mount Adams was active from about 520,000 to about 1,000 years ago. During the past million years, it has generated considerable eruptive materials. Mount Adams is also home to 12 officially named glaciers. Most of the glaciers originate from the mountain’s summit ice cap.

Roger Reeves and Terrie Heslop began their photography journey with film cameras back in the 1970s and continued until the digital revolution. As a happily married couple, they explore the world around them and share the beauty of natural landscape. The pictures they took in Mount Adams are absolutely breathtaking.

See more about the pictures taken by Roger Reeves and Terrie Heslop here.

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(photo credit: Roger Reeves and Terrie Heslop)