Roundup: Tibet’s Cryosphere, Methane Release, and Rockfall-induced GLOFs

The Tibetan Plateau’s Changing Cryosphere

From Earth-Science Reviews: “This paper comprehensively reviews the current status and recent changes of the cryosphere (e.g., glacier, snow cover, and frozen ground) in the TP from the perspectives of observations and simulations. Because of enhanced climate warming in the TP, a large portion of glaciers have experienced significant retreat since the 1960s, with obvious regional differences. The retreat is the smallest in the TP interior, and gradually increases towards the edges.”

Check out the full study here.

Tibetan Plateau mountains on GlacierHub
A view of the mountains from a green valley in the Tibetan Plateau (Source: Hans Johnson/Flickr).

 

Methane Release Under Greenland’s Ice Sheet

From Nature: “Here we find that subglacially produced methane is rapidly driven to the ice margin by the efficient drainage system of a subglacial catchment of the Greenland ice sheet…We show that subglacial hydrology is crucial for controlling methane fluxes from the ice sheet…Overall, our results indicate that ice sheets overlie extensive, biologically active methanogenic wetlands and that high rates of methane export to the atmosphere can occur via efficient subglacial drainage pathways. Our findings suggest that such environments have been previously underappreciated and should be considered in Earth’s methane budget.”

Check out the full study here.

Helheim Kangerdlugssuaq Greenland ice sheet on GlacierHub
NASA’s IceBridge flying over the Helheim/Kangerdlugssuaq region of Greenland’s ice sheet, documenting summertime melt (Source: NASA Goddard/Flickr).

 

Rockfall-induced GLOFs in Nepal

From Landslides: “On April 20, 2017, a flood from the Barun River, Makalu-Barun National Park, eastern Nepal formed a 2–3-km-long lake at its confluence with the Arun River as a result of blockage by debris. Although the lake drained spontaneously the next day, it caused nationwide concern and triggered emergency responses…This study highlights the importance of conducting integrated field studies of recent catastrophic events as soon as possible after they occur, in order to best understand the complexity of their triggering mechanisms, resultant impacts, and risk reduction management options.”

Check out the full study here.

Upper Barun Valley on GlacierHub
Upper Barun Valley, Nepal. The aftermath of the Langmale GLOF are shown on the lower left portion of the image (Source: Roger Nix/Flickr).