Photo Friday: Bizarre Glacier Sports

As climate change continues to impact world glaciers, adventure athletes are taking sports to an extreme at famous glacial settings. Ever heard of glacier boarding, for example? It’s just one of the bizarre sports now being played at glaciers near you.

As GlacierHub reported in 2014, canyon guides Claude-Alain Gailland and Gilles Janin took boogie boards to Altesch glacier in Switzerland, coasting through a freezing channel carved into the ice. If that doesn’t look like fun, in 2007, Kealii Mamala invented another new sport: glacier surfing. He became the first person to surf a wave caused by a calving glacier at Alaska’s Childs Glacier.

Even the world’s most prominent athletes are participating in the new sporting trend. In 2013, tennis superstars Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokoviche played an exhibition match at the Perito Moreno Glacier in Argentina. While, in reality, the match took place on a man-made court on a nearby barge, we’re pretty sure it’s the closest a game of tennis has ever been to a glacier. This Photo Friday, enjoy images of some bizarre glacier sports.

 

Glacier boarding is a popular new sport not for the faint of heart (Source: Cotswold Outdoor/Twitter).

 

Kealii Mamala makes glacier surfing look easy (Ryan Casey/YouTube still).

 

Two guys played a game of golf on the Crans-Montana Glacier in 2016 (Source: Mark Crossfield/YouTube).

 

Tennis superstars Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokoviche play an exhibition match at the Perito Moreno Glacier in Argentina (Source: Video still from SNTV).

 

The tennis match between the two superstars took place on a man-made court on a nearby barge (Source: Video still from SNTV).

 

Pakistani cyclist Samar Khan takes on the Biafo Glacier (Source: The Express Tribune).

 

 

For One Time Only, the Perfect Glacier Wave

In 2007 at Alaska's Childs Glacier, Kealii Mamala (on surfboard) and Garrett McNamara (on jetski) became the first, and probably only, people to surf a wave made by calving glacier ice. (Ryan Casey/YouTube still)
In 2007 at Alaska’s Childs Glacier, Kealii Mamala (on surfboard) and Garrett McNamara (on jetski) became the first, and probably only, people to surf a wave made by calving glacier ice. (Ryan Casey/YouTube still)

A wall of ice from Childs Glacier in Alaska crumbles into the Copper River, gradually at first and then all at once. As a massive wave created by the calving glacier builds power, two tiny figures appear against the vast gray expanse of churning water, one on a surfboard and the other on a jet ski. This is glacier surfing and just watching it might give you the chills.

Back in 2007, surfers Kealii Mamala and Garrett McNamara, a professional big wave rider who set a world record for surfing the largest wave ever, wanted to become the first people to surf a glacier. They made a video to show off their attempt.

The video is hard not to watch. As the wave speeds towards the two men, it looks as though the water washes right over them. “Oh, is he in there? Is he going to come out?” says an unidentified videographer as he loses sight of the figure on the surfboard.

The jetski circles back behind the wave. It’s a good 25 seconds before the little figures reappear, and the camera-man and spectators on the shore become the first to witness a human being surfing a wave created by the power of a glacier falling into the sea.

If you were to list the dangers of surfing next to a collapsing sheet of ice, one of the top ones might be getting hit by any of the enormous chunks of jagged ice that are launched into the air when the glacier hits the water.

“It’s like a bomb, and the giant pieces of ice fly like shrapnel,” McNamara said in “The Glacier Project,” a documentary about riding the ice wave.

It turns out that Copper River at Child’s Glacier is an ideal location for surfing. When a piece of ice calves from the glacier, it displaces enough water to make a wave so large that it curls all the way across the width of the river in a single sweep. This means there are no competing “break points.” According to Surfline.com, a website devoted to identifying the best surfing spots using weather reports and scientific measurements, a wave where all the break points line up is a “perfect” wave, because then a surfer can ride the wave all the way from one end to the other.

Ice breaking off into the Copper River from Alaska's Childs Glacier is said to make the ideal surfing wave, if you can get to it. (Rebecca/Flickr)
Ice breaking off into the Copper River from Alaska’s Childs Glacier is said to make the ideal surfing wave, if you can get to it. (Rebecca/Flickr)

The seeds of the Glacier Project were first sown back in 1995, when filmmaker Ryan Casey worked on an IMAX film Alaska: Spirit of the Wild with his father George Casey, near Childs Glacier. During the filming, Casey saw bits of ice break off from the glacier and fall into the water below, creating the kind of giant uniform wave described above. Casey thought it would be perfect for surfing, if only surfers could get out there. The practice of jet ski towing, by which a surfer is towed into a breaking wave, was not common at the time, but it was 12 years later, when Casey, McNamara, and Mamala headed to Alaska to test Casey’s theory that these glacier waves could be surfed.

“After the scout, I guaranteed that we would ride a wave – any wave,” McNamara said in an interview with surfingmagazine.com. But his enthusiasm evaporated pretty quickly. “After the first day, I just wanted to make it home alive. Not knowing where the glacier was going to fall, where the wave would emerge, or how big it would be. It was so different to anything we’ve experienced in our big-wave tow-surfing history. I spent most the time thinking about my family and wondering if I would survive to see them again. It was in a realm all its own.”

McNamara and Mamala each rode glacier waves during the trip. The largest for McNamara was 15 feet, while Mamala managed to snag a 20-25 foot wave, according to a press release about the project.

“I wouldn’t recommend it for any one,” McNamara said after his trip to Childs Glacier. “I won’t be going back. This is not a new sport.” So far, history has proved him right. The 2007 trip may constitute the only attempt at glacier surfing that will ever be made. There is little evidence that anyone has attempted a similar ride in the seven years since.