Roundup: Contaminated Arctic Spiders, Sand Abundance in Greenland, and Cryoconite on the Tibetan Plateau

Wolf spiders in West Greenland are indicators of metal pollution in mine sites

From Ecological Indicators: “In the Arctic, spiders are the most abundant group of terrestrial predators, with documented abilities to accumulate metals. In Greenland however, most contamination studies in relation to mining have targeted the marine environment, with less attention given to the terrestrial.”

“The contamination status of a terrestrial area can be estimated based on soil sampling and measurements. However, such measurements may be biased due to difficulties in collecting representative soil samples (i.e. caused by high within-site variation of soil contaminants or a lack of information on potential bioavailability of the contaminants investigated). It has therefore been hypothesized that ground dwelling wolf spiders, based on their frequent hunting activities and their active movement over their hunting habitat, would display contamination levels more representative of that area than a specific soil sample.”

Read more about the study here.

Wolf spider in the tundra (Source: Fiona Paton/Flickr)

Greenland’s melting ice sheet releases vast quantities of sand

From Henry Fountain and Ben C. Solomon of the New York Times: “The world makes a lot of concrete, more than 10 billion tons a year, and is poised to make much more for a population that is forecast to grow by more than 25 percent by 2050. That makes sand, which is about 40 percent of concrete by weight, one of the most-used commodities in the world, and one that is becoming harder to come by in some regions.”

“But because of the erosive power of ice, there is a lot of sand in Greenland. And with climate change accelerating the melting of Greenland’s mile-thick ice sheet — a recent study found that melting has increased sixfold since the 1980s — there is going to be a lot more.”

Read the full story here.

Cryoconite on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau enhances melting

From Journal of Glaciology: “Cryoconite is a dark-coloured granular sediment found in supraglacial environments, and it represents an aggregate of mineral particles, black carbon (BC) and organic matter (OM) formed by microbial communities.”

“Compared with snow and ice surfaces, cryoconite typically exhibits stronger light absorption, and its broadband albedo is <0.1 due to its effective absorption of visible and near-IR wavelengths. Thus, cryoconite can effectively influence the mass balance of glacier surfaces.”

Read more about the research here.

Debris and cryoconite at A8 glacier study site (Source: Li et al. 2019)
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