James Balog: Breathing Life Into Ice

21 January 2015, by

For more than 30 years, James Balog, an American photographer, has devoted himself to merging insights from art and science to create innovative and vivid interpretations of our changing world. His photographic interests are diverse, including endangered animals, North America’s old-growth forests, and polar ice. In 2007, Balog initiated a long-term photography project, called the […]

How Invertebrates Colonize Deglaciated Sites

20 January 2015, by

Scientists have long wondered how species colonize sites after deglaciation. A recent study by Amber Vater and John Matthews in the journal The Holocene of invertebrates–animals without backbones—on a number of sites in Norway advances the understanding of this colonization. It pays particular attention to succession, the processes of change in the species composition of […]

Roundup: A New Documentary, Ice Worms, Timelapse Videos

19 January 2015, by

  “Glacial Balance,” A New Documentary by Ethan Steinman on Climate Change “Water and its sources have historically been the key factor in the establishment of cities, of civilizations. But we are at a critical point in the environment and mankind’s existence. . . GLACIAL BALANCE takes us to Colombia, Argentina, Chile, Bolivia and Ecuador, getting […]

Photo Friday: Seals taking it easy on icebergs

16 January 2015, by

Seals are some of the cutest animals found in the Arctic and the Antarctic. This week’s photo friday features seals carrying out their daily activities on icebergs, which are important environmental features in their chilly habitats. The photos include leopard seals and crabeater seals among other species. Photo Friday highlights photo essays and collections from areas […]

Indigenous Livelihoods at Bolivia’s Highest Mountain

15 January 2015, by

A new study conducted at Sajama, the highest mountain in Bolivia, shows that local indigenous populations have been able to adapt to the changes in water resources that result from glacier retreat. Other environmental changes, as well as shifting economic and political circumstances, have also shaped their responses. Villarroel and her coauthors describe the area […]

On Tibetan Plateau, Permafrost Melt Worse Than Glacial Melt

14 January 2015, by

According to a recent study published in the journal Public Library of Science, glacial melt is taking a backseat in the Himalayas to permafrost melt as a central driver of alpine lake expansion and related environmental hazards. This finding is of great importance to policy-makers and communities, who must prepare for flooding and other hazards […]

John Muir: America’s Ice-Chief

13 January 2015, by

A rhapsodic wanderer trained in geology and botany, John Muir had a big hand in launching the American environmental movement and is considered by many to be the godfather of America’s national parks. The Scottish-born naturalist wrote numerous screeds in defense of wild places for national magazines around the turn of the 20th century that […]

Roundup: Thawing Glaciers, Iceberg Calving, “Dead” Glaciers

12 January 2015, by

Thawing Glaciers Release Pollutants  “As glaciers increasingly melt in the wake of climate change, it is not only the landscape that is affected. Thawing glaciers also release many industrial pollutants stored in the ice into the environment. Now, within the scope of a Swiss National Science Foundation project, researchers from the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Empa, […]

Photo Friday: Nunataks in Antarctica

9 January 2015, by

Nunataks are small volumes of rock that emerge above ice sheets and glaciers. They are isolated from mountain ranges and are often easier to access. This makes them particularly useful to geologists as a source of data about bedrock. The photos here shows the view of nunataks in Antarctica taken by Euphro and Chantal, who are both nunatak scientists […]

Two GlacierHub Writers Win Prizes in 2014

8 January 2015, by

Tsechu Dolma received a Brower Youth Award on 21 October 2014. These awards have been given since 2010 to young environmental leaders from Across North America in recognition of “sustainable projects, innovative ideas, and informed analyses” that benefit the environment. Dolma was born in Nepal to Tibetan refugee parents, and moved to the US when […]

An Icy Art Installation Clear As Crystal

7 January 2015, by

“Thinning Ice”, an installation commissioned by Swarovski for its ninth year at Design Miami (December 3 – 7, 2014), links melting glaciers and climate change through a three-dimensional experience. Architect Jeanne Gang collaborated with James Balog, a National Geographic filmmaker/photographer, to create the installation, which includes a kind of glacier sculpture and a series of […]

Ice Cavers Travel Into the Heart of Glaciers

6 January 2015, by

As their name suggests, ice caves are tunnel-like features that occur within ice bodies, usually glaciers. They have been known to science at least since 1900, when the American explorer and scientist Edwin Balch described them in his book Glacières or Freezing Caverns. In recent decades, some ice caves have become major tourist attractions. Ice […]