The Dancing Glacier

16 June 2015, by

The recent recession of the Qollqepunku glacier has ended an ancient ceremonial practice. Because of the rapid melting of the Qollqepunku glacier, and other glaciers in the region, the Ukuku have stopped taking glacial ice during the annual Qoyllurit’i festival and no longer light traditional candles on the glacier. Each indigenous community that attends the Qoyllurití festival designates individuals to play the important role of […]

Roundup: the Glacier Run, Models, and Georgia Glaciers

15 June 2015, by

The Glacier Run The 8th Glacier 3000 Run and Gstaad Kids Run will take place on Saturday, August 8, 2015. The racecourse passes through a beautiful alpine landscape offering both runners and spectators many spectacular views. Between the starting point on the Gstaad Promenade at 1’050 meters and the finish line at Glacier 3000 (2’950 […]

PhotoFriday: Kali Moves Into New Home

12 June 2015, by

McDonnell Polar Bear Point of the Saint Louis Zoo welcomed its first occupant – Kali on May 5, 2015. Kali is a two and half year-old, 850-pound orphaned male polar bear. He was turned over to US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) after his mother was killed by an Alaska Native hunter. His new home […]

Photo Friday: Mount Adams

5 June 2015, by

Mount Adams, the second highest mountain in the U.S. state of Washington, is a potentially active volcano in the Cascade Range. Mount Adams was active from about 520,000 to about 1,000 years ago. During the past million years, it has generated considerable eruptive materials. Mount Adams is also home to 12 officially named glaciers. Most […]

New Cyanotoxins Surface in Polar Region

3 June 2015, by

Death by cyanobacteria-made microtoxins is not pleasant. The toxins damage the nervous system, especially anatoxin-a, also known as a Very Fast Death Factor. As the global temperature increases, concerns about the range of these toxins are growing. For the first time, anatoxin-a has been found as far north as the polar regions, according to a […]

Glaciers Shape Lives in Upper Hunza

2 June 2015, by

Glacier and river dynamics shaped irrigation systems and land use practices in Pakistan since the late 1700’s, according to a new paper by Sitara Parveen and his colleagues. These systems and practices can still be observed hundreds of years later, but they face severe challenges from glacier retreat. Upper Hunza is located in the western Karakoram, Pakistan. […]

Photo Friday: Cryoconites and Glacier Tables

29 May 2015, by

Have you ever seen dark cavities on glaciers, which are also referred to as “cryoconites”? These holes, which can be meters deep,are created from debris on top of glaciers. Dark-colored debris, including soot, dust, and pollen, speed up the melting process of glacial ice as a consequence of their low reflectivity to incoming sunlight. In […]

Roundup: Cyanobacteria, Glacier Calving and Glacier Fluctuations

25 May 2015, by

Arctic biocrust cyanobacterial communities “In the polar regions cyanobacteria are an important element of plant communities and represent the dominant group of primary producers. They commonly form thick highly diverse biological soil crusts that provide microhabitats for other organisms. Cyanobacteria are also producers of toxic secondary metabolites. The north-west coast of Spitsbergen, are able to […]

Photo Friday: Glacier Illuminated by Aurora

22 May 2015, by

This week’s photos feature the Athabasca Glacier in Alberta, Canada with Northern Lights in the background. Photographer Paul Zizka captured ice climber Stuart and Takeshi Tani hanging from the glacier when the Northern Light hits the sky. Paul Zizka is a professional mountain landscape and adventure photographer based in Banff, Alberta. He has a passion […]

Artist Emma Stibbon Talks Glaciers and ‘Bearing Witness’

21 May 2015, by

For award winning artist Emma Stibbon, connecting with the landscapes she draws is a crucial part of her artistic process. Her travels have taken her to both poles and in between, where she has witnessed the impacts human activity has in some of the most isolated parts of the world. Stibbon, who is Senior Lecturer […]

Supercool water found near glaciers

20 May 2015, by

Temperatures in Spitbergen, Norway may be below freezing, but the water around the Glacier Front isn’t frozen, researchers Eugene Morozov from Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Aleksey Marchenko from the University Center in Svalbard, and Yu. D. Fomin from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, found, This process of supercooling, also known as undercooling, happens when the temperature of […]

Roundup: Irrigation, Monitoring, and Tidewater

18 May 2015, by

Evolution of Socio-hydrological Interactions in the Karakoram  “Based on three case studies, this paper describes and analyzes the structure and dynamics of irrigation systems in Upper Hunza, located in the western Karakoram, Pakistan. In these deeply incised and arid valleys, glacier and snow melt-water are the primary water sources for agricultural production. The study shows […]