Russian Navy Confirms Emergence of Five New Islands in the Arctic Ocean

21 November 2019, by

The physical geography of the Arctic Ocean is evolving as climate change causes ice melt to reveal new islands and waterways in remote areas near the North Pole. The exposure of this new frontier will alter the behavior of Russia’s strategic militaristic forces as well as shift the geopolitical environment of the region in terms of shipping and resource extraction.

Tlingit Song Recalls Glacier Bay and Time Gone By

19 November 2019, by

A recent paper describes a song from 120 years ago that a Huna Tlingit woman named Mary Sheakley first sang after an encounter with wolves in Glacier Bay Alaska. Just as remarkable is the spontaneous recollection of it decades later by her younger clan sister after being nearly lost to time.

Photo of the Ngozumpa Glacier in Nepal.

Mountain Summit Issues Call for Action on Climate Change

14 November 2019, by

The World Meteorological Organization convened a three-day summit to identify priority actions to support more sustainable development, disaster risk reduction, and climate change adaptation in high-mountain areas and downstream.

Video of the Week: Hellish Bike Race Down French Alpine Glacier

13 November 2019, by

British online publication SPORTbible posted a video on their twitter handle this week profiling the mad “Mountain of Hell” bike race—a yearly competition where hundreds of mountain bikers careen 8200 feet down a glacier at Les Deux Alpes ski resort in France.

Snow and Glacier Themed Animated Film ‘Abominable’ Fuels Geopolitical Controversy

7 November 2019, by

A half second blip in the newly released animated kids film “Abominable,” was all it took to aggravate a decades-old geopolitical controversy in Southeast Asia in October. The film—about a lovable yeti and his child companions’ journey to the Himalayas—has been banned in Vietnam and Malaysia, and boycotted in the Philippines.

New Studies Trace Glacier Dynamics in the Grand Tetons

5 November 2019, by

In Grand Teton National Park, two groups of researchers are investigating glaciers from different, but complimentary perspectives. National Park Service scientists are tracking glacial melt on five of the park’s eleven glaciers while Washington State University biologist, Scott Hotaling, examines the effects of glacial meltwater on the microbiota downstream.

Roundup: Glacier Melt Reveals New Islands, ICIMOD Job Search, and New Monuments

4 November 2019, by

In this week’s Roundup, read about the discovery of five new islands in the Arctic, ICIMOD’s search for a director general, and the World Monuments Fund’s 2020 Watch List.

Huge Cracks in Antarctic Glacier Foreshadow Epic Calving Event

30 October 2019, by

The European Space Agency (ESA) released a video this past week showing the evolution of two very large and disconcerting cracks in Antarctica’s Pine Island Glacier. They have each grown to 20km in length and could shear off a hunk of ice the size of Paris and Manhattan combined.

Roundup: Greta’s Glacier Visit, the World’s Highest Battlefield, and Glacier Fashion

28 October 2019, by

In this week’s GlacierHub Roundup, read about Greta Thunberg’s visit to Canada’s Athabasca Glacier, India’s tourism push on the Siachen Glacier, and Canada Goose’s new line of glacier-themed coats and parkas.

Photo Friday: Nevados de Chillán at Risk of Volcanic Eruption

25 October 2019, by

Chile’s geology and mining agency has issued a level-orange alert for the complex of snow-capped stratovolcanoes, indicating a significant uptick in volcanic activity.

The Enduring Allure of Glaciers Among Popular Beverage Companies

24 October 2019, by

Companies from Sierra Mist and Evian to Iceland Glacier and Gatorade seek to tie their brands to the sublime experience of visiting a glacier landscape or being subsumed by the environment of the high mountains and polar regions.

Glacial Ice Core Samples Reveal Sustainable Land-Use Practices in the Ancient Incan Empire

22 October 2019, by

Pollen trapped within Bolivia’s Illimani Glacier reveals that large scale ecological change did not occur until around 1740, long after the fall of the ancient Incan Empire, suggesting that the Inca practiced sustainable land management techniques unlike their European successors.