No Change in Black Carbon Levels on Peruvian Glaciers, Despite Pandemic Quarantine

12 May 2020, by

An interview with Peruvian glaciologist Wilmer Rodriguez, who reports that despite the global coronavirus shutdown, anthropogenic black carbon levels on glaciers in Peru remains steady.

Roundup: Norwegian Glacier Change, Climbing Federation Refocuses Priorities, and Antarctic Meltwater Influence on Phytoplankton

11 May 2020, by

In this week’s Roundup, read about the uniform retreat of recently advancing Norwegian glaciers, the International Climbing and Mountaineering Federation’s restated priorities, and how Antarctic meltwater is influencing phytoplankton, the base of marine food webs.

Photo Friday: The 2020 Greenland Melt Season is Underway

8 May 2020, by

The National Snow and Ice Data Center resumed daily monitoring of the 2020 Greenland melt season. The interactive chart, which is updated daily, provides a contextual look at ongoing melt across the ice sheet and its outlet glaciers.

Fogo Island’s Icebergs

28 April 2020, by

Bonnie McCay was on her brief annual stay at her Newfoundland home in early March when coronavirus shut the world down. After spring arrived in the Northern Hemisphere, the sea ice melted and it wasn’t long before icebergs began showing up off Fogo Island.

Video of the Week: Ice Fall at Chenega Glacier

8 April 2020, by

In this week’s Video of the Week check out a dramatic ice fall at Alaska’s Chenega Glacier captured by Australian Geographic photographer Chris Bray, who was there last autumn to capture the footage.

Celebrating Women in the Cryosphere

26 March 2020, by

To celebrate Women’s History Month, we selected five of our favorite stories about women in the cryosphere: a Japanese woman who was the first woman to summit Mount Everest, a Qashqai activist who lost her life when Iran downed a Ukrainian Airliner earlier this year, an all-female Andean climbing team, a glacier-based educational program for young women, and AGU President and polar scientist Robin Bell.

Photo Friday: The Drygalski Ice Tongue

20 March 2020, by

Ice tongues are oddball characters of the cryosphere. At 43-miles long and up to 15 miles wide, Antarctica’s Drygalski Ice Tongue is the world’s largest. Despite facing the constant threat of licking by belligerent icebergs, it has managed to hang on for some 4,000 years.

Request for Submissions to the Global Report of Indigenous Knowledge and Local Knowledge on Climate Change 2020

17 March 2020, by

The value of indigenous knowledge and local knowledge to addressing anthropogenic climate change is being increasingly recognized and integrated. This call for submissions will help inform contributions to the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report.

Roundup: COVID-19 in Glacier Regions

16 March 2020, by

For this week’s Roundup we compiled the glacier regions affected by the novel coronavirus––including the Alps, Pyrenees, Caucasus, Karakoram, Himalaya, Greenland, and Cascades––where the dislocation of remote glacier communities cuts both ways. Expeditions to Mount Everest have been suspended.

Photo Friday: Piedmont Glacier ‘Like Cold Honey’

13 March 2020, by

Operation IceBridge may have ended, but nostalgia for personal images from the missions, like that of glaciologist Mike MacFerrin, keep it alive. His photo of a piedmont glacier in northeast Greenland reminds us of the fluid nature of ice.

Video of the Week: A Glacial Surge in Pakistan

11 March 2020, by

Less than one percent of glaciers surge. In the Karakoram, however, there is an extraordinarily high concentration of glaciers that do. In this week’s Video of the Week, see how the surging Shishpar Glacier in Pakistani Karakoram threatens human settlements.

Photo Friday: Engabreen Glacier and Subglacial Laboratory

28 February 2020, by

Norway-based glaciologist and IPCC author Miriam Jackson takes us to her office, 200 meters below the ice of Engabreen Glacier, where scientists have been observing the Norway’s fastest retreating glacier since 1992.