Photo Friday: Capturing Climate Change Through Art

“It is my life’s mission to convey the urgency of climate change through art,” states Zaria Forman. And she does this through painstakingly drawn, detailed pastel drawings that look so real they can often be mistaken for photographs.

She captures the beauty of places like Hawaii, the Maldives, Greenland, and Antarctica.

Her series of pastel drawings, Antarctica, in particular, captures landscapes in flux. “As temperatures rise, glaciers melt more rapidly than they grow. Many of us are intellectually aware that climate change is our greatest global challenge, and yet the problem may feel abstract, the imperiled landscapes remote. The scale and detail of my drawings are meant to make Antarctica’s magnificence and ephemerality visceral to the viewer, emulating the overpowering experience of being beside a glacier,” says Zaria.

A reproduction of her work Whale Bay, Antarctica, No.4, 84×144, 2016, and a time-lapse video depicting the process of making the work, is currently being featured as part of the first exhibition, In Human Time, for the Climate Museum in New York. It is presented in partnership with the Parsons School of Design’s Sheila Johnson Design Center at The Arnold and Sheila Aronson Galleries on Fifth Avenue and will be exhibited till January 15.

For more information on Zaria Forman, visit zariaforman.com.

For more information on the exhibition and the Climate Museum, visit climatemuseum.org.

 

Whale Bay, Antarctica no.4, 84×144, 2016 (Source: Zaria Forman).

Whale Bay is a place on the western side of the Antarctic peninsula where icebergs calved from a nearby glacier are carried by wind and water to their final resting place. The icebergs scrape against the shallow bay becoming “grounded” (they remain there until they have completely melted). As the bay encloses grounded icebergs, it is also called an “iceberg graveyard.”

Whale Bay, Antarctica no.1, 60×90, 2016 (Source: Zaria Forman).

 

Whale Bay, Antarctica no.2, 50×75, 2016 (Source: Zaria Forman).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roundup: Climate justice, Impacts of Glacial Retreat, and Sediments

German Court to Hear Peruvian Farmer’s Climate Case Against RWE

From The Guardian: “A German court has ruled that it will hear a Peruvian farmer’s case against energy giant RWE over climate change damage in the Andes, a decision labeled by campaigners as a ‘historic breakthrough.’ Farmer Saul Luciano Lliuya’s case against RWE was ‘well-founded,’ the court in the north-western city of Hamm said on Thursday. Lliuya argues that RWE, as one of the world’s top emitters of climate-altering carbon dioxide, must share in the cost of protecting his hometown Huaraz from a swollen glacier lake at risk of overflowing from melting snow and ice.”

Read the full report here.

Saul Luciano Lliuya, a farmer from Peru, at the UN climate talks in Bonn earlier this month. (Source: The Guardian/Twitter).

 

Impacts of Rapidly Declining Snow and Ice in the Tropical Andes

From ScienceDirect: “The reduction in water supply for export-oriented agriculture, mining, hydropower production and human consumption are the most commonly discussed concerns associated with glacier retreat, but many other aspects including glacial hazards, tourism and recreation, and ecosystem integrity are also affected by glacier retreat. Social and political problems surrounding water allocation for subsistence farming have led to conflicts due to lack of adequate water governance. This review elaborates on the need for adaptation as well as the challenges and constraints many adaptation projects are faced with, and lays out future directions where opportunities exist to develop successful, culturally acceptable and sustainable adaptation strategies.

Read the research paper here.

Declining glacier on Mt. Ausangate in the Peruvian Andes (Source: Wikimedia Commons).

 

Greenland’s Meltwaters

From Nature Geoscience: “Limited measurements along Greenland’s remote coastline hamper quantification of the sediment and associated nutrients draining the Greenland ice sheet, despite the potential influence of river-transported suspended sediment on phytoplankton blooms and carbon sequestration. We find that, although runoff from Greenland represents only 1.1 percent of the Earth’s freshwater flux, the Greenland ice sheet produces approximately 8 percent of the modern fluvial export of suspended sediment to the global ocean. We conclude that future acceleration of melt and ice sheet flow may increase sediment delivery from Greenland to its fjords and the nearby ocean. ”

Read more here.

Researchers collecting samples of subglacial discharge from a land-terminating glacier of the Greenland ice sheet (Source: I. Overeem et al/Nature.com).

 

Photo Friday: The Alpine Photographer

Fiona Bunn, a British and Swiss Alpine landscape photographer, is committed to creating awareness of human impacts on glacier landscapes.

“My alpine photography highlights both the ageless grandeur of the Alps, yet also its innate vulnerability to humankind’s impact,” says Fiona on her work.

Her photographs are inspired by her childhood visits and explorations of Swiss mountains and interest in arts and graphic design.

The glaciers I visited as a child are now rapidly shrinking. I actually remember the physical shock of seeing the degradation in the size of the Grenz Glacier when I returned to the Valais region of Switzerland some years after my visits as a child. There is an active debate surrounding this; my main hope is that featuring the beautiful Alps and glaciers through my photography will also draw our attention to those who live there. These alpine communities livelihoods depends upon the glaciers which created these beautiful landscapes. Such extreme melt is an indicator of something drastically changing in our climate. It has gone beyond reversal in my opinion, but we can at least seek to preserve what remains as much as possible,” says Fiona Bunn.

Fiona’s photographs have been exhibited at the Menier Gallery and the Brick Lane Gallery, in London, as part of the Milan Expo, and also in the Alpine Museum in Zermatt.

For more of her work, visit her website www.fiphotos.org, and follow her on Facebook, Twitter [@alpineclick]
and Instagram [@fi_bee24].  

Fiona has also recently released her 2018 calendar, which is available to GlacierHub readers at a 20 percent discount using the code GlacierHub18

30 x 20 cms ~ £12.79 ~ A saving of £3.20 (usual price £15.99) 

http://www.fiphotos.org/product/glacier-hub-alpine-calendar-2018/

20 x 20 cms ~ £10.41 ~ A saving of £2.58 (usual price £12.99) 

http://www.fiphotos.org/product/glacier-hub-calendar-2018-compact/

Prices include postage and packing for the UK and worldwide.

View of the Grenz Glacier from Breithorn Summit (4164 m) (Source: Fiona Bunn).

 

View of Breithorn summit (4164 m) of the Pennine Alps (Source: Fiona Bunn)

 

Pollux mountain (4092 m) on the Pennine Alps (Source: Fiona Bunn)

 

Dawn on the 4000 m Alpine peaks (Source: Fiona Bunn).