Request for Submissions to the Global Report of Indigenous Knowledge and Local Knowledge on Climate Change 2020

Indigenous issues in high mountain areas is a primary raison d’etre for GlabierHub and has been since the site began in 2015. GlacierHub strives to communicate the essentiality of indigenous knowledge to climate crisis solutions and sustainable practices related to glacier communities. With that goal in mind, we invite our readers to submit materials and to pass this invitation to submit papers to the Indigenous Knowledge and Local Knowledge on Climate Change 2020 on to others as well. The deadline to submit is May 31, email to ilk2020ipcc@gmail.com

The importance and relevance of Indigenous Knowledge and Local Knowledge in responding to the challenge of anthropogenic climate change is recognized by policymakers and academics. The Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) in its recent Global Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystems Services underscores the key contributions of Indigenous peoples and local communities to conservation and fostering of biodiversity. Although the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) acknowledges the importance of Indigenous Knowledge and Local Knowledge (IKLK), the inclusion of non-published IKLK remains beyond the scope of the Sixth Assessment Report.

This request for submissions seeks contributions from Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities to the Global Report of Indigenous Knowledge and Local Knowledge on Climate Change 2020. We expect that this report will document, among other things, how holders of IKLK observe, forecast and respond to anthropogenic climate change. In doing so, the report will constitute an invaluable input to be considered in the Working Group II contribution to the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report.

Evenki woman on the move, Eastern Siberia, Russia, Snowchange. Used with permission.

Working Group II of the IPCC assesses the impacts, adaptation and vulnerabilities of socio-economic and natural systems to climate change, negative and positive consequences of climate change and options for adapting to it. The assessment is undertaken from a global to a regional view of ecosystems and biodiversity, and of humans and their diverse societies, cultures and settlements. It considers the vulnerabilities, capacities and limits of these natural and human systems to adapt to climate change, and thereby reduce climate-associated risks together with options for creating a sustainable future for all through equitable and integrated approaches to mitigation and adaptation efforts.

The Global Report Indigenous and Local Knowledge on Climate Change 2020 is not an official IPCC product. It is, however, a stand-alone yearbook report documenting Indigenous Knowledge and Local knowledge contributions about climate change that will inform the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report.

Photo: Fisherman on lake Phayao, Northern Thailand, Snowchange. Used with permission.

We envision that the core of the report will be the contributions of holders of IKLK, which will be preceded by an introductory chapter framing the report. Finally, there will be a concluding chapter highlighting the main findings and key messages to policymakers and academics.

A group of eight academics involved in the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report have been chosen to facilitate, edit and produce the Indigenous and Local Knowledge Report 2020 on Climate Change. They receive no benefits from the process and in order to maintain global equity and remain unbiased, no organisation will be affiliated with the Indigenous Knowledge and Local Knowledge Report 2020 on Climate Change. It will be released online as an open-access PDF in December 2020 to global and local audiences.

We invite all relevant stakeholders to contribute to the Indigenous and Local Knowledge Report 2020. Submissions are especially welcomed from Indigenous and local knowledge holders, organisations and communities. All submissions are following free, prior and informed consent (FPIC). Submissions will remain the intellectual property of the authors, but by submitting to this initiative, author(s) agree to share their contributions universally for the Indigenous Knowledge and Local Knowledge Report 2020.

Lilac-breasted roller (Coracias caudatus) in NE South Africa, a symbol of peace in many cultures. Antoine Scherer, used with permission.

We welcome 2-3 page submissions (max. 2000 words) on all aspects of Indigenous Knowledge and Local Knowledge related to climate change. Submissions may include, but are not limited to, oral history, worldviews, observed changes, forecasts, impacts, responses, human and Indigenous rights, ecological restoration, conflict, equity issues, and so on. Submissions should include the location, community, and name(s) as well as communications details of the submitting entities and/or individuals.

Submissions can be made in the official UN languages in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish. However, the report language will be in English. Primary submissions will be translated. The submissions, after editing, are planned to be published in the Indigenous Knowledge and Local Knowledge Report 2020 in December 2020.

The deadline for submissions to the Indigenous Knowledge and Local Knowledge on Climate Change 2020 is 31st May, 2020. All submissions should be sent via email to ilk2020ipcc@gmail.com (an email repository accessed only by the report editors).

Information can be received from editors at tero.mustonen@snowchange.org

Read More on GlacierHub:

Indigenous Activist Among Those Killed In Iran’s Takedown of Civilian Airliner

What the Yak Herders of Northern Bhutan Are Saying About Global Warming

These Indigenous Communities are Models for How to Adapt to Climate Change

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