Roundup: Thwaites Earthquakes, Peru Glacier Collapse Claims Lives, and an Alaskan Streamflow Study

Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica is Now Causing Earthquakes

Thwaites Glacier is one of Antarctica’s largest contributors to sea level rise from Antarctica.  Its rate of loss has doubled in the past three decades, earning it the moniker “doomsday glacier.” Understanding why it’s retreating so quickly has been a challenge, but glaciologists have recently discovered that the glacier is now generating its own seismic activity when it calves (breaks off icebergs into the ocean), which could help in unlocking the physical keys to this process. The findings were published early this year in Geophysical Research Letters. 

Read the full story on Thwaites earthquakes by Grennan Milliken on GlacierHub here.

Icebergs near the terminus of Thwaites Glacier. If it were to collapse it could raise global sea levels by ten feet. (Source: NASA)

A Catastrophic Glacier Collapse and Mudflow in Salkantay, Peru

On 23 February 2020 an enormous, catastrophic debris flow tore down the Salkantay River in Santa Teresa, Peru. This event has killed at least four people, with a further 13 reported to be missing. Given the magnitude of the flow, this number is probably uncertain. The mudflow was captured in an extraordinary video posted to YouTube.

Read the full post on the Salkantay ice/rock avalanche by Dave Petley on GlacierHub here.

A Classification of Streamflow Patterns Across the Coastal Gulf of Alaska

From the plain language abstract: “Streams provide society with many benefits, but they are being dramatically altered by climate change and human development. The volume of flowing water and the timing of high and low flows are important to monitor because we depend on reliable streamflow for drinking water, hydroelectric power, and healthy fish populations. Organizations that manage water supplies need extensive information on streamflow to make decisions. Yet directly measuring flow is cost‐prohibitive in remote regions like the Gulf of Alaska, which drains freshwater from an area greater than 400,000 km2, roughly the size of California. To overcome these challenges, a series of previous studies developed a tool to predict historical river flows across the entire region. In this study, we used 33 years of those predictions to categorize different types of streams based on the amount, variability, and timing of streamflow throughout the year. We identified 13 unique streamflow patterns among 4,140 coastal streams, reflecting different contributions of rain, snow, and glacial ice. This new catalog of streamflow patterns will allow scientists to assess changes in streamflow over time and their impact to humans and other organisms that depend on freshwater.”

Read the full study published by the American Geophysical Union here.

Source: AGU/Sergeant et al

Read More on GlacierHub:

Photo Friday: Norwegian Glacial Ice Preserves Ancient Viking Artifacts

Video of the Week: Animation Shows Frequency of Antarctic Calving Events

Black History Month: Honoring an Arctic Explorer

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