Roundup: Iceberg-Tsunami Dynamics, Backcountry Avalanche Risk Rises, and Cruikshank Receives Prestigious Award

Study Aims to Better Understand Iceberg-Tsunami Dynamics

Iceberg calving can create powerful waves when large chunks of ice fall from glaciers into the ocean. A recent study conducted 66 experiments to better understand the features of iceberg calving to determine iceberg-tsunami strength and parameters.

Read the story by Elza Bouhassira on GlacierHub here.

The pool used by the researchers during the experiments. In the image, a gravity-dominated experiment is being conducted (Source: Figure 2/Heller et al).

Crowded Backcountry Ski Slopes Increase Risk of Skiers Endangering Each Other

Avalanche risk is on the rise as more people enter backcountry alpine terrain. A new study seeking to quantify the risk to multi-party avalanches hopes to raise awareness and provoke discussion.

Read the story by Grennan Milliken on GlacierHub here.

A skier during a run down Hurricane Ridge in Olympic National Park, Washington State. (Credit: National Park Service)

Cruikshank Awarded Polar Knowledge Canada’s 2019 Northern Science Award

From the Polar Knowledge Canada press release: “Polar Knowledge Canada is pleased to announce that the recipient of the 2019 Northern Science Award is Dr. Julie Cruikshank. The award was presented at the ArcticNet Annual Scientific Meeting on December 5, 2019, in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

“Dr. Cruikshank, Professor Emerita of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia, has a long and distinguished record of documenting the oral histories and life stories of Athapaskan and Tlingit elders, and exploring Yukon First Nations’ systems of narrative and knowledge. Her work, built on a foundation of respectful relationships, has helped Yukon First Nations recognize and honour the strengths of their cultural traditions, and has brought new insight into the nature of history and the interplay of different knowledge systems. Yukon Indigenous governments regularly draw on Dr. Cruikshank’s work and her knowledge.”

Read the story published by Polar Knowledge Canada here.

Dr. Julie Cruikshank (Source: University of British Columbia).

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