Roundup: Tropical Glaciers, Experimental Cryoconite, and Grand Teton National Park

Changes in tropical glaciers in Peru between 2000 and 2016

From The Cryosphere:

“Glaciers in tropical regions are very sensitive to climatic variations and thus strongly affected by climate change. The majority of the tropical glaciers worldwide are located in the Peruvian Andes, which have shown significant ice loss in the last century. Here, we present the first multi-temporal, region-wide survey of geodetic mass balances and glacier area fluctuations throughout Peru covering the period 2000–2016.”

Read the article here.

Llaca Glacier, located in Peru’s Cordillera Blanca (Source: Wikimedia Commons/Edubucher)

Studying cryoconite

From Polar Biology:

“Cryoconite holes are surface melt-holes in ice containing sediments and typically organisms. In Antarctica, they form an attractive system of isolated mesocosms in which to study microbial community dynamics in aquatic ecosystems. Although microbial assemblages within the cryoconite holes most closely resemble those from local streams, they develop their own distinctive composition.”

Read the article here.

Measuring cryoconites on Longyearbreen Glacier during field work of Arctic microbiology, Svalbard (Source: Wikimedia Commons/Kertu Liis Krigul)

Mass loss in Grand Teton National Park

From The Seattle Times:

“Officials are studying the glaciers in Grand Teton National Park in northwestern Wyoming to see how climate change is affecting their movement and melting.

Scientists are using GPS readings from the surface of the glaciers, time-lapse photos and stakes to examine some of the park’s 11 glaciers, the Post Register reported Saturday.

They are trying to see whether the glaciers are still moving slowly or have stopped completely.”

Read the article here.

A view of the Grand Teton Range (Source: Wikimedia Commons/Daniel Mayer)

Read more on GlacierHub:

Making Connections at the 2019 International Mountain Conference

Video of the Week: Melania Trump Pays a Visit to Wyoming’s Grand Teton National Park

‘From Thinking to Doing’: Olafur Eliasson on Art and Action

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