Photo Friday: US Glaciers Seen from Space

The International Space Station may at first seem unrelated to Earth’s cryosphere—but it’s not. NASA astronauts flying in low-Earth orbit aboard the artificial satellite have captured images of America’s majestic national parks, including those shaped over thousands of years by the imperceptibly slow movements of glaciers.

While experiments on ISS often focus on robotics, the human immune system, and even methods for growing lettuce, the satellite’s cameras capture live video and still images as it orbits Earth at an altitude of 250 miles above the planet’s surface.

Take a look here at majestic views of the US National Park system captured by NASA astronaut Jeff Williams. His images depict glacier-rich landscapes such as Alaska’s Glacier Bay National Park and Denali National Park, Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming, and Washington’s Olympic National Park, among many others.

A composite image of Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska captured from the International Space Station. (Source: NASA)
A composite image of Mt. McKinley, Denali National Park, Alaska captured from the International Space Station. (Source: NASA)
A composite image of Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming captured from the International Space Station. (Source: NASA)
A composite image captured from the International Space Station of Olympic National Park, with Seattle and Tacoma, Washington in the background. (Source: NASA)

Read More on GlacierHub:

Illustrating the Adventures of German Naturalist Alexander von Humboldt

The Dead of Mount Everest Are Seeing the Light of Day

Glaciers Get New Protections with Passage of Natural Resources Act

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