Roundup: Investigating the New Interior Secretary, Mercury in Tibet, and the International Yak Conference

Interior Secretary David Bernhardt is being investigated for calendar discrepancies

From Politico: “[A letter from the National Archives and Records Administration to the Interior Department] adds new pressure to a department that is facing investigations by House Democrats who question whether Bernhardt has violated federal record-keeping laws. Bernhardt’s existing daily schedule shows that the former fossil fuel and agriculture lobbyist has met with representatives of former clients who stood to gain from Interior’s decisions, but the department has released few details about his activities during about one-third of his days in office.”

David Bernhardt (right) being sworn in as the Deputy Secretary of the Department of the Interior by former Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke (left) in 2017. (Source: Department of the Interior/Flickr)

Read more about the new Secretary of the Interior and a federal proposal to raise the height of Shasta Dam in California on GlacierHub.

Mercury concentrations at Mt. Yulong on the Tibetan Plateau

From Environmental Science and Pollution Research: “For the first time, Hg was studied over the Mt. Yulong region, in the various matrices of the environment including, surface snow/ice, snowpit, and meltwater… It was evident of the presence of an anthropogenic source of pollutants that have been long-range transported to Yulong Mountain… Suggesting that the concentration of Hg depends [more] on the distance from the anthropogenic sources than the different characteristics of the water bodies.”

Mount Yulong in the Tibetan Plateau, shrouded in mist and clouds. (Source: Sergio Tittarini/Flickr)

Read more about mercury contamination from glacial rivers in High Arctic watersheds on GlacierHub.

Yak herders of the Himalayas voice their concerns

From ICIMOD: “For the first time in the history of the annual International Yak Conference, yak herders from the southern side of the Himalaya were able to join their counterparts from other parts of Asia to raise their concerns… Given the challenges facing yak herding, there is much to be gained from knowledge sharing across borders… Sharing such knowledge and technology from plateaus to other yak-rearing countries will contribute to sustainable yak farming in the region.”

Silhouette of the Great Himalayan wild Yak, with the white peaks of the Himalayas off in the distance (Source: lensnmatter/Flickr).

Read more on GlacierHub about yak herders in Bhutan and what they have to say about global warming.

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