Video of the Week: A Glacier in Greenland Is Growing—But Probably Not for Long

Famous for being the largest and fastest-thinning glacier in Greenland—and creating the iceberg that sunk the Titanic, Greenland’s Jakobshavn Glacier has recently increased in size. For the past 20 years it has been melting, but during 2016-2017 it grew vertically about 100 feet, according to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. 

With so much news about global warming, it’s rare to hear about a glacier that’s expanding. It is crucial to note, though, that the glacier’s growth is not because climate change has suddenly stopped. Rather, it’s expansion can be attributed to cooler temperatures in the Atlantic Ocean. The cooling occurred in 2016 and is likely due to the natural variability of North Atlantic Oscillation.

The waters of the Atlantic will eventually warm again and could bring about renewed melting of the Jakobshavn Glacier—and higher sea levels.

“At first we didn’t believe it,” NASA’s Ala Khazendar said. “We had pretty much assumed that Jakobshavn would just keep going on as it had over the last 20 years.”

NASA’s Oceans Melting Greenland studies the impact of ocean temperatures on Greenland’s ice sheets and glaciers.

Last week we brought you a video of a thinning glacier; this week watch NASA’s video explaining the recent growth of the Jakobshavn Glacier.

Read More on GlacierHub:

Nevado Ausangate Glaciers, Peru Retreat, and Lake Formation

Rising Temperatures Threaten Biodiversity Along the Antarctic Peninsula

Ragnar Axelsson Documents Iceland’s Disappearing Glaciers

Supraglacial Lakes Are Not Destabilizing Greenland’s Ice Sheet, Yet

Please follow, share and like us:
error

Leave a Reply