Roundup: Citizens Tracking Glaciers, Seismic Noise, and Holocene Glaciers

Park Enlists Citizens to Track Changes in Teton Glaciers

From U.S. News: “The project aligns with one of Grand Teton’s fundamental duties, keeping tabs on its natural resources. Estimates vary, but with global temperatures increasing some studies suggest many glaciers could disappear within the next few decades.”

Read more about Citizens Tracking Glaciers here.

Grand Tetons (Source: Brian Perkes/Flickr).

 

Fracturing Glacier Revealed by Ambient Seismic Noise

From AGU 100: “Here we installed a seismic network at a series of challenging high‐altitude sites on a glacier in Nepal. Our results show that the diurnal air temperature modulates the glacial seismic noise. The exposed surface of the glacier experiences thermal contraction when the glacier cools, whereas the areas that are insulated with thick debris do not suffer such thermal stress.”

Read more about glaciers and seismic noise here.

Annapurna, Nepal (Source: David Min/Flickr).

 

Holocene Mountain Glacier History in Greenland

From Science Direct: “Here, we use a multi-proxy approach that combines proglacial lake sediment analysis, cosmogenic nuclide surface-exposure dating (in situ10Be and 14C), and radiocarbon dating of recently ice-entombed moss to generate a centennial-scale record of Holocene GIC fluctuations in southwestern Greenland.”

Read more about holocene mountain glacier history here.

Qoroq Ice Fjord, Narsarsuaq (Source: Alison/Flickr).

 

 

Leave a Reply