Native Americans Call to Change Names of Yellowstone Sites

An organization of tribal leaders representing Indian Nations in the Dakotas and Nebraska has called for a name change of Yellowstone National Park’s Mt. Doane and Hayden Valley.

Mt. Doane, a 10,500-foot peak located in the Absaroka Range along the eastern boundary of the park, was named after Gustavus Doane, an American lieutenant who played a major role in a large massacre of Native peoples in 1870. Tribes across the United States and Canada have joined a petition to change the name of Mt. Doane to “First Peoples Mountain.”

In addition, a number of groups have called to change the name of Hayden Valley, a major attraction located in the center of Yellowstone National Park. The valley was created by glacial retreat about 13,000 years ago. However, like Mt. Doane, the name of the valley is contentious. It was named after Ferdinand V. Hayden, a geologist and surveyor who advocated for removal of Native Americans.

Hayden Valley, Yellowstone National Park (Source: Freddie Tanedo/Flickr).
The name change petitions in Yellowstone mirror a national movement to remove monuments and landmarks tied to racism.  
 In an interview with NPR’s “All Things Considered,” Chief Stanley Charles Grier of the Piikani Nation said Hayden “incited this hatred towards indigenous peoples at the time in his policies and his written statements.”

In August, the Great Plains Tribal Chairman’s Association, along with individual tribes, submitted a proposition to change the name of the iconic valley to
 “Buffalo Nations Valley.”

 

However, controversy surrounds these petitions. In early 2018, elected county park commissioners in Wyoming voted against the Native Americans’ proposal for these landmarks to be renamed. Some commissioners expressed that changing these two names would open the door to a long series of controversies and debates over the naming of other landmarks. Moreover, they have advocated that people like the current names and are comfortable with them.
Although the committee voted against the name change, the U.S. Geological Survey’s Board on Geographic Names has the final authority on the decision.Regardless of what the board determines, many Native communities remain committed to calling the landmarks by their Indigenous names. Len Necefer, a member of Navajo Nation who received a doctorate from Carnegie Mellon University’s Department of Engineering and Public Policy is a leader in this effort. Necefer stimulates and encourages people to place geotags using the location’s Indigenous name. Necefer created social media pages on Facebook and Instagram to check in to places using geotags that show Native place names and indicate their locations around Colorado. @NativeOutdoors has over 20 thousand followers on Instagram and encourages the dialogue and acknowledgement of Native communities in public wild spaces.
@NativesOutdoors(Source: NativesOutdoors/Instagram)

The push to rename Hayden Valley and Mount Doane is part of a movement that is likely to continue.

Please follow, share and like us:
error

One Response to “Native Americans Call to Change Names of Yellowstone Sites”

Leave a Reply