Roundup: Oxygen Isotope, Non-biting Midges and Prokaryotes

Holocene Atmospheric Circulation in the Central North Pacific

From ScienceDirect: “The North Pacific is a zone of cyclogenesis [the development of an area of low pressure in the atmosphere, resulting in the formation of a cyclone] that modulates synoptic-scale atmospheric circulation. We present the first Holocene oxygen isotope record (δ18Odiatom) from the Aleutian Islands supported by diatom assemblage analysis. Our results demonstrate distinct shifts in the prevailing trajectory of storm systems that drove spatially heterogeneous patterns of moisture delivery and climate across the region.”

Read more about the new Holocene oxygen isotope record from the Aleutian Islands here.

A satellite picture of the Aleutian Island Range
Aerial view of the Aleutian Islands amidst the clouds (Source: NASA).

 

The Enigma of Survival Strategies in Glacial Stream Environments

From Freshwater Biology: “Glacier retreat is a key component of environmental change in alpine environments, leading to significant changes in glacier-fed rivers. The species compositions of Diamesinae and Orthocladiinae (of the non-biting midges family) are diverse and strongly affected by the changing habitat conditions upon glacier retreat. Here, we show that Diamesinae have extremely flexible feeding strategies that explain their abundance, high body-mass and predominance in glacier-fed streams.”

Discover more about the insects that live within the glacier-fed streams here.

Midge
A winter-emerging midge (Source: Flickr).

 

Phylogenetic Diversity of Prokaryotes on Lewis Glacier in Mount Kenya

From African Journal of Microbiology Research: “The seasonal snowpack of the temperate glaciers are sources of diverse microbial inoculi. However, the microbial ecology of the tropical glacial surfaces is endangered, hence posing an extinction threat to some populations of some microbes due to rapid loss of the glacier mass. The aim of this study was to isolate and phylogenetically characterise the prokaryotes from the seasonal snow of Lewis glacier in Mt. Kenya. Analyzing snow samples, the results confirm that the seasonal tropical snowpack of Lewis glacier is dominated by the general terrestrial prokaryotes (e.g. Bacillus with 53%) and a few glacier and snow specialist species (e.g. Cryobacterium with 5.9%).”

Find out more about these cellular organisms living on the surface of a Mount Kenya glacier here.

Cryobacterium
Cryobacterium (Source: Reddy et al.).

 

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