Roundup: Plant Life in Extreme Conditions, Freshwater in Tibet, and Alaskan Salmon

The Growth of Simple Plant Life in Extreme Conditions

From Polar Biology: “Aerial dispersal in the colonization of bare ground by lichens in the polar regions remains poorly understood. Potential colonists may arrive continually, although extreme abiotic conditions limit their viability. [The authors] investigated the vegetative dispersal of Antarctic macrolichens along a successional gradient (from 8.6–7.0 ka BP up to present) after glacial retreat on James Ross Island, in the Antarctic Peninsula region.“

Read more about the research here.

Olga Bohuslavová, one of the lead researchers on this project, speaking with Prince Charles (Source: Masaryk University).

 

Future Warming and Water Resource Availability in the Tibetan Plateau

From Earth Science Reviews: “Future climate warming is expected to have a significant effect on the operation of Earth and Ecological systems. A key concern in the future is water resource availability. In regions such as the Tibet Plateau (TP) lakes and glaciers appear to be highly sensitive to climate forcing and variations in the size and extent of these systems will have profound socio-economic and environmental consequences in South and Central Asia.”

Learn more about how these water sources will be affected here.

Qinghai Lake, China’s largest lake in China, located about 100 kilometers west of Xining (Source: Iwtt93/Flickr).

 

What Does Glacial Retreat in Alaska Mean for the Salmon Population?

From BioScience: “Glaciers cover 10 percent of our planet’s land surface, but as our climate warms, many glaciers are shrinking. As glacial retreat proceeds northward along the Pacific coast of the continental United States, through Canada, to Alaska, it is creating new stream habitat for salmon that has not existed in millennia. When and how will this new stream rollout happen? Where will salmon be distributed in the future?”

Find out what they discovered about the future of the salmon population here.

Alaskan salmon attempt to swim upstream (Source: Andrew E. Russell/Flickr).

 

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