Photo Friday: Environmental Monitoring of Svalbard and Jan Mayen

The Environmental Monitoring of Svalbard and Jan Mayen (MOSJ) is an umbrella program that collects and analyzes environmental data in the arctic regions of Svalbard and Jan Mayen. Some data of interest include the extent and thickness of sea ice around Svalbard, Fram Strait and the Barents Sea; temperature and salinity of the water transported around Svalbard via the West Spitsbergen Current; ocean acidification; and local sea level changes. This Photo Friday, take a glimpse of the MOSJ researchers in action as they collect measurements in the field. Read their full report and findings here.

 

Sea Ice around Svalbard (Source: Angelika H.H. Renner, 2011).
Sea Ice around Svalbard (Source: Angelika H.H. Renner).

 

The West Spitsbergen Current (WSC) represents the northernmost reaches of the North Atlantic Current system. Warm, saline, subtropical waters are carried across the North Atlantic and along the eastern side of the Nordic seas to end up at Fram Strait. The amount of sea ice flowing through the Fram Strait varies annually, which impacts the strength of the thermohaline circulation and thus, global climate.

 

Branches of the West Spitsbergen Current (in red) and the Arctic Ocean Outflow (in blue) in Fram Strait (Source: Renner et al)
Branches of the West Spitsbergen Current (in red) and the Arctic Ocean Outflow (in blue) in Fram Strait (Source: Renner et al).

 

Collecting Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements from the West Spitsbergen Current from a cruise (Source: Paul A. Dodd)
Collecting Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements from the West Spitsbergen Current from a cruise (Source: Paul A. Dodd).

 

A researcher collecting newly-formed sea ice from Tempelfjorden, Svalbard (Source: Jago Wallenschus)
A researcher collect newly-formed sea ice from Tempelfjorden, Svalbard (Source: Jago Wallenschus).

 

Researchers collecting samples from sea ice from Kongsfjorden, Svalbard (Source: S. Gerland)
Researchers collect samples from sea ice from Kongsfjorden, Svalbard (Source: S. Gerland).
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