Roundup: New Purple Bacteria, Chilean GLOFs, and Glacier Flow Rates

Emerging from Glacier Permafrost: New Purple Bacteria found in Tianshan

From International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology: “A Gram-stain-negative, motile and rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain B2T, which can synthesize purple pigments of violacein and dexyoviolacein, was isolated from Tianshan glacier in Xinjiang, China…. Based on genomic relatedness, physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic data, strain B2T […] is considered to represent a novel species.”

Find out more about the discovery here.

New bacteria discovered in melted glacier permafrost in the Tianshan Mountains in western China (Source: Wang et al.).

 

Understanding GLOF Dynamics in Arid Andes of Chile

From Natural Hazards: “We study a remarkable GLOF triggered by the failure of a subglacial lake in the Manflas Valley, Arid Andes of Chile, in 1985 providing insights into the lake’s origin, clarifying the failure mechanism and modeling the GLOF event-related dynamics… We show that the failed lake (4 × 106 m3) formed in a low-slope (≤ 10°) area and that extreme (≥ 90th percentile) annual precipitation before the GLOF contributed to the lake filling and probably to the dam collapse.”

Check out more about what scientists have learned from the 1985 GLOF event here.

Manflas Valley, where a 1985 outburst flood devastated the region and the setting of a recent study about understanding the event (Source: Ricardo Guler/Flickr).

 

Exploring the Factors Behind Flow Rates in Greenland’s Exit Glaciers

From Science: “The largest uncertainty in ice sheet models used to predict future sea-level rise originates from our limited understanding of processes at the ice-bed interface… We find that this sliding relation does not apply to the 140 Greenland glaciers that we analyzed.”

Read more about this groundbreaking study here.

An exit glacier in Greenland (Source: mharoldsewell/Flickr).

Leave a Reply