Roundup: Project Trumpmore, Yak Herders, & the 2018 St Andrews Prize

Glacier Art: “Project Trumpmore” to Carve President’s Face on Melting Iceberg

From the official website of Project Trumpmore: “Global warming is a huge, abstract concept… We think that in its intangibility, global warming lacks a concrete symbol. One that would prove it exists, or not. That’s what we are setting out to do: a scientific art project… We hope that the more conversation takes place around our monument and global warming, the better possibilities politicians have to make concrete fact-based decisions.”

Read more about the project and ways to contribute here.

Finnish climate activists and artists plan to carve President Trump’s face into Arctic ice (Source: RT/Twitter).

Bhutanese Yak Herders’ Perceptions of Glacier Retreat

From BioOne: “A questionnaire survey was conducted to understand how a mountain ecosystem in northern Bhutan is perceived by local yak herders to be changing under climate warming… The questionnaire sought information on herders’ awareness and perceptions of weather patterns, climate changes, and their impact on vegetation, herding practices, and livelihoods… The study concluded that yak herders’ perceptions provide critical signs of warming and their vulnerability to changing climatic conditions in the alpine environment.”

Find out more about their perspectives on how a warming climate would impact their lives here.

A new study shows how Yak herders from Bhutan perceive climate change (Source: Deanne June Scanlan/Twitter).

The Mountain Institute, Peru, Wins Major Environmental Award

From the 2018 St Andrews Prize formal announcement: The Mountain Institute, Peru, “which integrates 2,000 years of indigenous knowledge of water management in the Andes with contemporary science and technology to create hybrid solutions that improve water security, support livelihoods, strengthen communities and increase ecosystem-wide resilience in mountain communities has won the St Andrews Prize for the Environment 2018.”

Check out more about this prestigious environmental award and the Mountain Institute, Peru, here.

The Mountain Institute, Peru, collaborates with indigenous highland communities in Peru to restore traditional water management techniques (Source: Univ of St Andrews/Twitter).

Leave a Reply