Roundup: Climate justice, Impacts of Glacial Retreat, and Sediments

German Court to Hear Peruvian Farmer’s Climate Case Against RWE

From The Guardian: “A German court has ruled that it will hear a Peruvian farmer’s case against energy giant RWE over climate change damage in the Andes, a decision labeled by campaigners as a ‘historic breakthrough.’ Farmer Saul Luciano Lliuya’s case against RWE was ‘well-founded,’ the court in the north-western city of Hamm said on Thursday. Lliuya argues that RWE, as one of the world’s top emitters of climate-altering carbon dioxide, must share in the cost of protecting his hometown Huaraz from a swollen glacier lake at risk of overflowing from melting snow and ice.”

Read the full report here.

Saul Luciano Lliuya, a farmer from Peru, at the UN climate talks in Bonn earlier this month. (Source: The Guardian/Twitter).

 

Impacts of Rapidly Declining Snow and Ice in the Tropical Andes

From ScienceDirect: “The reduction in water supply for export-oriented agriculture, mining, hydropower production and human consumption are the most commonly discussed concerns associated with glacier retreat, but many other aspects including glacial hazards, tourism and recreation, and ecosystem integrity are also affected by glacier retreat. Social and political problems surrounding water allocation for subsistence farming have led to conflicts due to lack of adequate water governance. This review elaborates on the need for adaptation as well as the challenges and constraints many adaptation projects are faced with, and lays out future directions where opportunities exist to develop successful, culturally acceptable and sustainable adaptation strategies.

Read the research paper here.

Declining glacier on Mt. Ausangate in the Peruvian Andes (Source: Wikimedia Commons).

 

Greenland’s Meltwaters

From Nature Geoscience: “Limited measurements along Greenland’s remote coastline hamper quantification of the sediment and associated nutrients draining the Greenland ice sheet, despite the potential influence of river-transported suspended sediment on phytoplankton blooms and carbon sequestration. We find that, although runoff from Greenland represents only 1.1 percent of the Earth’s freshwater flux, the Greenland ice sheet produces approximately 8 percent of the modern fluvial export of suspended sediment to the global ocean. We conclude that future acceleration of melt and ice sheet flow may increase sediment delivery from Greenland to its fjords and the nearby ocean. ”

Read more here.

Researchers collecting samples of subglacial discharge from a land-terminating glacier of the Greenland ice sheet (Source: I. Overeem et al/Nature.com).

 

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