Roundup: Changing Waterways, Hotter Parks, Glacier Music

As a Glacier Retreats a Major Water Source Dries Up

From CBC News:

Looking up the Slims River Valley, from the south end of Kluane Lake. The river used to flow down the valley from the Kaskawulsh glacier (Source: Sue Thomas/CBCNews)

“It’s [the Kaskawulsh glacier] been the main source of water into Yukon’s Kluane Lake for centuries, but now the Slims River has suddenly slimmed down — to nothing.

‘What folks have noticed this spring is that it’s essentially dried up,’ said Jeff Bond of the Yukon Geological Survey.

‘That’s the first time that’s happened, as far as we know, in the last 350 years.’

What’s happened is some basic glacier hydrology, Bond says — essentially, the Kaskawulsh Glacier has retreated to the point where its melt water is now going in a completely different direction, away from the Slims Valley.”

Check out he full story here.

 

Rising Temperatures in National Parks Like Glacier Bay

From Climate Central:

Temperature change in Glacier Bay National Preserve (Source: Climate Central)

“With such a wide variety of climates across the park system, the country’s 59 National Parks all have different challenges to manage in the changing climate. Some parks have experienced dramatic temperature changes, and these shifts can lead to water shortages (or too much water), ocean acidification, and species migration…. Glacier National Park — The number of glaciers has been cut in half since 1968, and the largest glaciers are expected to be gone within the next 15 years.”

Look at temperature trends in national parks here.

 

Hosted by Greenpeace: Professional Pianist Plays on Glacier

From Greenpeacespain on YouTube:

“Through his music, acclaimed Italian composer and pianist Ludovico Einaudi has added his voice to those of eight million people from across the world demanding protection for the Arctic. Einaudi performed one of his own compositions on a floating platform in the middle of the Ocean, against the backdrop of the Wahlenbergbreen glacier (in Svalbard, Norway).”

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