Posts Tagged "tourism"

Roundup: Studying and Dancing to Melting Glaciers

Posted by on Aug 1, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: Studying and Dancing to Melting Glaciers

Spread the News:ShareDancing to the tune of a melting glacier: CoMotion tackles climate change From Missoulian:    “If someone suggested you watch artists perform an hour-long dance about climate change, you might shoot them your best ‘have-you-lost-your-mind’ look. But your curiosity level might be raised, too. When Karen Kaufmann’s phone rang in February 2015 and the caller asked her about putting together just such a production, her reaction, although certainly not the same, at least followed a similar arc. ‘I grappled with it,’ says Kaufmann, artistic director at the University of Montana’s CoMotion Dance Project. ‘The topic overwhelmed me. It was not immediately intuitive how one would go about choreographing climate change.'” Read more about CoMotion’s production of “Changing Balance/Balancing Change” here. Visitors To A Shrinking Alaskan Glacier Get A Lesson On Climate Change From NPR:  “John Neary, director of the visitor center for [Mendenhall Glacier in Juneau, Alaska], wants the more than 500,000 people who visit the Mendenhall Glacier each year to know that it’s rapidly retreating due to climate change. ‘It became our central topic really just in the last few years,’ Neary says.” Read about Neary’s programming efforts to teach visitors about the effects of climate change here.   The Tiny World of Glacier Microbes Has an Outsized Impact on Global Climate From Smithsonian:  “The ability to tinker with our planet’s climate isn’t isolated to Arctic puddles. Microbes within these small pools, and nestled in lakebed sediments buried miles beneath the Antarctic ice sheet, could harbor the ability to seriously alter the global carbon cycle, as well as the climate. And researchers have only recently begun to navigate these minuscule worlds[….] Scientists once thought these holes were devoid of life. But researchers are now finding that they actually contain complex ecosystems of microbes like bacteria, algae and viruses.” Read more about a researcher’s three-week efforts to monitor the ability of puddles and the life contained in them to manipulate Earth’s climate here. Spread the...

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Roundup: Teaching Tourists, Landing Safely, Watching Cracks

Posted by on Jun 13, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, News | 0 comments

Roundup: Teaching Tourists, Landing Safely, Watching Cracks

Spread the News:ShareEach week, we highlight three stories from the forefront of glacier news. Climate Change Education for Mendenhall Glacier Tourists From KTOO: “On a busy summer day, thousands of people — mostly cruise ship passengers — visit Juneau’s Mendenhall Glacier. The U.S. Forest Service wants those tourists to take in the dramatic views, but also consider why the glacier is shrinking. Visitor center director John Neary is making it his personal mission. That means trying to make the message stick — long after the tourists are gone…“It became our central topic really just in the last few years,” said Neary. He’s not afraid to admit he’s on a mission. He wants the more than 500,000 people who visit the glacier each year to know that it’s rapidly retreating due to climate change, and the 18 interpreters who work for him are prepared to talk about it.” More on Mendenhall here. Pemberton Icefield Glacier Breaks the Fall of a Crash-Landing in Canada From Weather.com: “‘We tried to accelerate — that was the end of the valley, like cul de sac.’ Jedynakiewicz. told the CBC . ‘I say, ‘Full power! Full power!’ But the plane doesn’t respond. I checked in the last second, the speed it was 40 miles [per hour] when [we made] impact with the ice. It was a soft landing, soft like on a pillow. Believe me.’ The impact knocked out the plane’s radio, Toronto Metro reports, but left the plane almost undamaged and the three men unhurt. ‘I think the wing tips only missed the rock pile by about a foot,’ Hannah told the Metro. There was rocks on one side and a waterfall right in front of us and we jumped over the waterfall (to reach the glacier). So it was touch and go all right. It was a miracle. First thing was say, ‘Oh, God thank you we are alive,’” Jedynakiewicz told the CBC. ‘Not even scratch can you imagine? Three of us.’” Learn more about the emergency landing here. Greenland Glacier Becoming Increasingly Unstable From Albany Daily Star: “A glacier in northeast Greenland that holds enough water to raise global sea levels by more than 18 inches has come unmoored from a stabilizing sill and is crumbling into the North Atlantic Ocean. Losing mass at a rate of 5 billion tons per year, glacier Zachariae Isstrom entered a phase of accelerated retreat in 2012, according to findings published in the current issue of Science. “North Greenland glaciers are changing rapidly,” said lead author Jeremie Mouginot, an associate project scientist in the Department of Earth System Science at the University of California, Irvine. “The shape and dynamics of Zachariae Isstrom have changed dramatically over the last few years. The glacier is now breaking up and calving high volumes of icebergs into the ocean, which will result in rising sea levels for decades to come.” The research team – including scientists from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the University of Kansas – used data from aerial surveys conducted by NASA’s Operation IceBridge and satellite-based observations acquired by multiple international space agencies (NASA, ESA, CSA, DLR, JAXA and ASI) coordinated by the Polar Space Task Group.” For more, visit the Albany Daily Star’s Report. Spread the...

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Roundup: More Cars, Skiers but Fewer Helicopters This Summer

Posted by on May 9, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Roundup, Tourism | 0 comments

Roundup: More Cars, Skiers but Fewer Helicopters This Summer

Spread the News:ShareEach week, we highlight three stories from the forefront of glacier news.  100 YEARS OF PARKS From MONTANA STANDARD: “After Yellowstone National Park welcomed a record 4 million visitors in 2015, what will America’s first national park do for an encore in 2016?Probably more of the same. Tourism experts are predicting that 2016 should be another banner year for Montana’s tourism industry. Montana hosted 11.7 million nonresident travelers in 2015, an 8 percent increase from 2014. However, the $3.6 billion, in spending represented a decrease of 8 percent from the previous year. UM’s research shows that Yellowstone and Glacier National Park represent the biggest draw to out-of-state travelers. A number of events that will coincide with the centennial of the National Park Service could also boost visitation this year.” Read more here.   Group wants Glacier Park helicopter tours permanently grounded From Missoulian: “Click on a website Mary T. McClelland created a few days ago, and you’ll see waves lapping at the shore of Lake McDonald in Glacier National Park. McClelland this week released an open letter to Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell on behalf of Friends for a Quiet! Glacier Coalition, which calls for an end to scenic helicopter tours over the park by 2017. Glacier’s solitude has been shattered by hundreds of helicopter overflights,” McClelland’s letter says, “and the incessant noise pollution endured by wildlife and visitors is destroying what Glacier stands for – the pinnacle of natural beauty and tranquility.”  Read more here. Top 5 Glaciers to Ski This Summer From OnTheSnow: “If hiking for your turns during the spring means you’re committed, what does hiking for you turns during the peak of summer make you? Aside from chemically unbalanced, it makes you lucky. A number of glaciers still exist in North America (believe it or not), from the Sierras to the Tetons, offering skiers and riders not only an endless winter, but endless views as well. Here are our top-five spots to scratch (or should we say shred) that summer itch. 1. Grand Teton National Park: Glacier Route, Middle Teton 2. Glacier National Park: Salamander Glacier 3. Mount Shasta: Hotlum-Wintun Glacier 4. Sierra Nevada: Palisade Glacier 5. Mount Rainier: Paradise Glacier” Read more here. Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Sichuan–Tibet Highway

Posted by on Apr 8, 2016 in Featured Posts, Images, Tourism, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Sichuan–Tibet Highway

Spread the News:ShareThe Sichuan–Tibet Highway is known as China’s most dangerous highway. The highway begins in Chengdu, the capital of southwestern China’s Sichuan province, and ends in Lhasa, the capital of the Tibet Autonomous Region. The highway spans 2,142 km, or 1331 miles, over 14 mountains (some with glaciers), runs through ancient forests, and crosses many rivers.  Because of the steep inclines of the landscape, the road was constructed with many curves and zigzags. Running through valleys, up and down mountains, and across or alongside rapid rivers, the route is made even more perilous by the fact that it is not fully paved with proper roads in some places. Originally called the Kangding-Tibet Highway, this lengthy road will take the most dedicated traveler 44 hours to drive, but can take up to 15 days for someone who wants to stop and see all the sights (like a glacier or two) along the way. Yulong Xueshan - Jade Dragon Snow Mountain near Lijiang in Yunnan Source: Brücke-Osteuropa/ WikimediaCommons Map of route Source: google maps aerial view Source: dangerousroads Friendship Highway (G318) after Lhakpa La Pass Source: Royonx/Wikimedia Commons Hairpin turns Source: 张骐/Wikimedia Commons A group of adventurous drivers took 11 sports cars on a journey along the famously perilous Sichuan–Tibet Highway, six of which didn’t even make it halfway. The disastrous results from the ill-advised adventure include a Ferrari and a Maserati with damages like broken axles and sheared tires. See the video below for highlights from their trip. Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Jade Dragon Snow Mountain

Posted by on Mar 25, 2016 in Featured Posts, Images, Tourism, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Jade Dragon Snow Mountain

Spread the News:ShareJade Dragon Snow Mountain, in southern China’s Yunnan province, is known for its beauty and for the many tourists that flock there yearly. But the glaciers that top this mountain range may not be around for much longer. A Chinese info site stated in 2010 that four of the 19 glaciers on Jade Dragon have already disappeared. The mountain’s location at the edge of the Tibetan plateau may be contributing to the accelerated melting since the plateau’s glaciers are generally melting faster than other low-lying ones. This decline is of utmost importance since much of China depends on glacial run off for their water supply. Experience the beauty of the Jade Dragon Snow Mountain and its dwindling glaciers in the slideshow below.   chensiyuan, GFDL, /Wikimedia Commons © CEphoto, Uwe Aranas / CC-BY-SA-3.0/Wikimedia Commons Andrew Brown/Flickr 2936767971_c44774aa61_o Laurence & Annie/Flickr Laurence and Annie/Flickr Spread the...

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