Posts Tagged "tibet"

Roundup: Blue Lakes in Antarctica, Yak Dung and River Gauges in Asia

Posted by on Aug 29, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, News, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: Blue Lakes in Antarctica, Yak Dung and River Gauges in Asia

Spread the News:ShareThis Week’s Roundup: Blue lakes on an East Antarctic glacier are a troubling sign, scientists say From Yahoo News: “British researchers have discovered a troubling trend in East Antarctica: As air temperatures become warmer each summer, more and deeper lakes are showing up atop Langhovde Glacier. Their study, published this month in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, is the first to monitor the meltwater pools for an extended period of time in that part of the icy continent.” Click here to learn more about this troubling trend. Yak dung is helping melt Tibetan glaciers From Forbes: “Scientists had long assumed that India and China—two of the world’s leading sources of black carbon pollution—were responsible for what fell on the glaciers in Tibet and the Himalayas[….] Instead, he found that a lot of the black carbon is local. While power plants in China and fires in India do contribute black carbon, in the remote interior of the Tibetan Plateau it appears to come mostly from burning yak dung and other immediate sources.” Click here to read more about the small but mighty power of yak dung.   Pakistan expands glacier monitoring in effort to cut disaster risk From Thomson Reuters Foundation News: “Pakistan will invest $8.5 million to expand a network of glacier monitoring stations tracking the pace of glacial melt in the Hindu Kush, Karakoram and Himalayan mountain ranges, in an effort to strengthen early warning systems and reduce the impact of flooding in the South Asian country.” Click here to learn more about Pakistan’s new glacial monitoring research program. Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Tibetan Plateau From Space

Posted by on Jul 15, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Tibetan Plateau From Space

Spread the News:Share55 million years ago, a major collision took place between two of the large blocks that form the Earth’s crust. The Indian Plate pushed into the Eurasian Plate, creating what is known as the Tibetan Plateau. The region, also known as the “Third Pole,” spans a million square miles and contains the largest amount of glacier ice outside of the poles. A photograph of the southern Tibetan Plateau taken from space was released June 17th, showing the dramatic topography in false color. The photograph, taken by the Sentinel-2A, was captured near Nepal and Sikkim, a northern state of India, on February 1st. According to the European Space Agency (ESA), “From their vantage point 800 km high, satellites can monitor changes in glacier mass, melting and other effects that climate change has on our planet.” This week, enjoy stunning satellite pictures of the Tibetan Plateau over time. NASA also has taken photographs of the same plate collision from space, showing the snow-capped Himalayas, which are still rising. A true-color image of the Tibetan Plateau, taken in 2003 by NASA’S MODIS Rapid Response Team, shows the region’s lakes as dark patches against the sand-colored mountains. Prior to the true-color photograph, a spaceborne radar image of the Himalayan Mountains was taken in 1994 in southeast Tibet. Each color is assigned to a different radar frequency that depends of the direction that the radar was transmitted. Spread the...

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Roundup: How Glaciers Affect and Are Affected By Water

Posted by on May 23, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: How Glaciers Affect and Are Affected By Water

Spread the News:ShareEach week, we highlight three stories from the forefront of glacier news. Totten Glacier Hurtles Towards Retreat and Possible Collapse From Nature: “Satellite-based observations indicate that the margin of Totten Glacier may be experiencing greater ice loss than anywhere else in East Antarctica. This, coupled with the presence of low-lying subglacial basins upstream means the Totten Glacier catchment area could be at risk of substantial ice loss under ocean-warming conditions.” Learn more about the processes causing this retreat and the potential sea level rise associated with it.   Are Dams the Glaciers of Tomorrow? From Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL: “Water management in reservoirs could substantially mitigate future summer water shortages, expected as a consequence of ongoing glacier retreat, researchers report. The team simulated the effect of climatic change on glaciers across the European Alps and estimated that two thirds of the effect on seasonal water availability could be avoided when storing water in areas becoming ice free.” Find out how these researchers suggest dealing with glacier retreat and water supplies. Scientists Present New Research on Tibet’s Climate Risks From The Columbus Dispatch: “A consortium of scientists from around the world have gathered in Columbus at Ohio State University’s Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center for the first U.S. meeting about climate issues facing the Tibetan Plateau, a region that includes about 100,000 square kilometers of glaciers that provide drinking water to nearly a third of the Earth’s people.” Read more about the importance of the Tibetan Plateau and why these scientists feel action is so urgently needed. Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Sichuan–Tibet Highway

Posted by on Apr 8, 2016 in Featured Posts, Images, Tourism, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Sichuan–Tibet Highway

Spread the News:ShareThe Sichuan–Tibet Highway is known as China’s most dangerous highway. The highway begins in Chengdu, the capital of southwestern China’s Sichuan province, and ends in Lhasa, the capital of the Tibet Autonomous Region. The highway spans 2,142 km, or 1331 miles, over 14 mountains (some with glaciers), runs through ancient forests, and crosses many rivers.  Because of the steep inclines of the landscape, the road was constructed with many curves and zigzags. Running through valleys, up and down mountains, and across or alongside rapid rivers, the route is made even more perilous by the fact that it is not fully paved with proper roads in some places. Originally called the Kangding-Tibet Highway, this lengthy road will take the most dedicated traveler 44 hours to drive, but can take up to 15 days for someone who wants to stop and see all the sights (like a glacier or two) along the way. Yulong Xueshan - Jade Dragon Snow Mountain near Lijiang in Yunnan Source: Brücke-Osteuropa/ WikimediaCommons Map of route Source: google maps aerial view Source: dangerousroads Friendship Highway (G318) after Lhakpa La Pass Source: Royonx/Wikimedia Commons Hairpin turns Source: 张骐/Wikimedia Commons A group of adventurous drivers took 11 sports cars on a journey along the famously perilous Sichuan–Tibet Highway, six of which didn’t even make it halfway. The disastrous results from the ill-advised adventure include a Ferrari and a Maserati with damages like broken axles and sheared tires. See the video below for highlights from their trip. Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Jade Dragon Snow Mountain

Posted by on Mar 25, 2016 in Featured Posts, Images, Tourism, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Jade Dragon Snow Mountain

Spread the News:ShareJade Dragon Snow Mountain, in southern China’s Yunnan province, is known for its beauty and for the many tourists that flock there yearly. But the glaciers that top this mountain range may not be around for much longer. A Chinese info site stated in 2010 that four of the 19 glaciers on Jade Dragon have already disappeared. The mountain’s location at the edge of the Tibetan plateau may be contributing to the accelerated melting since the plateau’s glaciers are generally melting faster than other low-lying ones. This decline is of utmost importance since much of China depends on glacial run off for their water supply. Experience the beauty of the Jade Dragon Snow Mountain and its dwindling glaciers in the slideshow below.   chensiyuan, GFDL, /Wikimedia Commons © CEphoto, Uwe Aranas / CC-BY-SA-3.0/Wikimedia Commons Andrew Brown/Flickr 2936767971_c44774aa61_o Laurence & Annie/Flickr Laurence and Annie/Flickr Spread the...

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