Tag / Peru

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  • Roundup: Climate justice, Impacts of Glacial Retreat, and Sediments

    In this week’s roundup, we look at an indigenous Peruvian farmer’s fight for climate justice, impacts of glacial retreat in the tropical Andes, and increasing sediment delivery to global oceans from Greenland’s ice sheets.

  • Wildfires in Peru Could Increase Glacial Melt

    A recent study by John All et al., “Fire Response to Local Climate Variability,” investigates whether or not human interference in the fire regime of Huascarán National Park in Peru was the primary cause of an increase in fire activity in the park. The fire activity, whether caused by humans or climate variability, was poorly…

  • Roundup: Seals, Flood Mitigation, and Freezing Levels

    Seal Whiskers Detect Ecosystem Change From Polar Biology: “Warm Atlantic water in west Spitsbergen have led to an influx of more fish species. The most abundant marine mammal species in these fjords is the ringed seal. In this study, we used isotopic data from whiskers of two cohorts of adult ringed seals to determine whether…

  • Roundup: Avalanches, Droughts, and a Sherpa protest

    Roundup: Avalanches, Droughts, and Sherpas   Calving Event in Peruvian Lake Damages Infrastructure Designed to Reduce Flood Risk From El Comercio: “Small ice avalanches have damaged the system of syphons in Lake Palcacocha, Ancash, Peru. Marco Zapata, the head of the Glacier Research Unit at INAIGEM, stated that on May 31, around 8 p.m., a…

  • Using Drones to Study Glaciers

    A new study shows how Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) can be used to track high-altitude glacier change in a relatively cheap, safe and accurate way.

  • Local Communities Support Mountain Sustainability

    International capacity-building collaborations have been initiated to observe glaciers and develop action plans in the tropical Andes and Central Asia. A recent study titled “Glacier Monitoring and Capacity Building,” by Nussbaumer et al., highlights the importance of glaciers in the Andes and Central Asia for water management, hydropower planning and natural hazards.  The Andes and Central…

  • Ice-core Evidence of Copper Smelting 2700 Years Ago

    The mysterious Moche civilization originated on the northern coast of Peru in 200-800 AD. It was known for its metal work, considered by some to be the most accomplished of any Andean civilization. But were the Moche the first Andean culture to originate copper smelting in South America? While the Moche left comprehensive archaeological evidence of an early…

  • Photo Friday: The Melting Andean Glaciers

    In South America, the tropical glaciers of the Andes have been shrinking at an alarming rate, leaving the local communities at risk of losing an important water source. In Bolivia, for example, an Andean glacier known as the Chacaltaya Glacier disappeared completely in 2009, cutting off a valuable water resource to the nearby city of…

  • Climate Change Increases Flood Risk in Peru

    The rising danger of glacial lake flooding in a warmer climate has important implications for humans and animal populations in Peru’s Cordillera Blanca. A recent study in CATENA by Adam Emmer et al. examined a large swath of nearly 900 high altitude Peruvian lakes in the mountainous Cordillera Blanca region, studying their susceptibility to outburst floods…

  • Roundup: Tragedy in Antarctica, Antimony and Glacier Risks

    Roundup: Tragedy, Antimony and Risk   Prominent Climate Scientist Dies in Antarctica New York Times: “Gordon Hamilton, a prominent climate scientist who studied glaciers and their impact on sea levels in a warming climate, died in Antarctica when the snowmobile he was riding plunged into a 100-foot-deep crevasse. He was an associate research professor in the…