Posts Tagged "patagonia"

Photo Friday: Upsala Glacier

Posted by on Feb 12, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Upsala Glacier

Spread the News:ShareUpsala Glacier, a stunning glacier within Parque Nacional Los Glaciares in Argentina, has been retreating rapidly due to climate change. NASA has found, through satellite imaging, that Upsala’s ice front has moved back approximately 2 miles since 2001, following a similar trend seen in the rest of Patagonia (the vast area at the southern extent of Chile and Argentina). Also featured in the photos below is the Estancia Cristina–a popular ranch that many visitors use as an outpost on their journey through the glacial park, especially to see Upsala. The ranch offers unique views of the glaciers and its own beautiful scenery. Upsala gets its namesake from the Swedish University (Uppsala University) that first sponsored glacier research in this area. The area has been extensively studied since, and Upsala is often used as an example of glacial retreat in Argentina. Upsala’s retreat is significant because of the size of the glacier; once the largest glacier in South America, it is now the third largest. Argentinian glaciers, and Upsala in general, will aid in our further understanding of glacier dynamics. Cristina Estancia Ranch Cristina Estancia Ranch (Photo:<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/8632855@N05/3132389522/in/photolist-5LNjgU-mWNrP2-AovBjN-5ULuBg-BeyDho-BUkdW5-DBwf7r-DzcUYf-kPy5sx-DzcVh1-Dr7Emo-mWQjRb-5LNiNy-5ULx6p-5UL9dX-5ULkN6-baXWPx-baXWYX-5UQtgj-aBAbqT-aBJ85t-aBLGyq-aBLE29-aBJ4nZ-aBHX58-aBHVzg-aBLd5A-aBLCAs-aBHUF8-aBLDnN-aBLFPJ-aBHvbD-aBLJMq-aBJ3Ev-aBLL8L-aBJ7jn-aBJ5Ng-aBHWjr-aBHTSg-aBLcqN-aBLETQ-aBHTfv-dbHFM7-baXYbD-baXXNP-baXXDP-baXXZF-5LivTv-dbHAar-55GC6d"> Shane R/Flikr</a>) Upsala Glacier Upsala Glacier (Photo:<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mederic/2201782237/"> Médéric/Flikr</a>) Near Estancia Cristina Near Estancia Cristina (Photo:<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/benobryan/3223386378/in/photolist-5UQGtd-79DsEh-5LNjgU-mWNrP2-AovBjN-5ULuBg-BeyDho-kPy5sx-BUkdW5-DBwf7r-DzcUYf-DzcVh1-Dr7Emo-mWQjRb-5LNiNy-5ULx6p-5UL9dX-5ULkN6-baXWPx-baXWYX-5UQtgj-aBAbqT-aBJ85t-aBLGyq-aBLE29-aBJ4nZ-aBHX58-aBHVzg-aBLd5A-aBLCAs-aBHUF8-aBLDnN-aBLFPJ-aBHvbD-aBLJMq-aBJ3Ev-aBLL8L-aBJ7jn-aBJ5Ng-aBHWjr-aBHTSg-aBLcqN-aBLETQ-aBHTfv-dbHFM7-9Yt9Up-baXYbD-baXXNP-baXXDP-baXXZF">Ben O'Bryan/Flikr</a>) Upsala Glacier Retreat Upsala Glacier Retreat (Photo:<a href="https://www.nasa.gov/content/upsala-glacier-retreat">NASA/</a>) Mountain near Estancia Cristina Mountain near Estancia Cristina (Photo:<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/benobryan/3222497455/"> Ben O'Bryan/Flikr</a>) Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Perito Moreno Glacier

Posted by on Dec 4, 2015 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images, Tourism | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Perito Moreno Glacier

Spread the News:ShareThe Perito Moreno Glacier is a glacier located in the Los Glaciares National Park in southwest Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. It is one of the most important tourist attractions in the Argentinian Patagonia. The tourists can view the glacier from a small boat. Lucky visitors also could witness huge chunks of ice breaking from the glacier, falling into Lake Argentino. The Perito Moreno Glacier is one of only three Patagonian glaciers that is growing while most of the glaciers around the world are retreating, but the mysterious reason still puzzles climatologists. 8652199816_35e0325bbe_m Los Glaciares National Park 4934089627_ed81bc16ec_m Los Glaciares National Park 14307843312_f4a39d6a73_m Los Glaciares National Park Perito Moreno Glacier Los Glaciares National Park, Argentina Los Glaciares National Park, Argentina Spread the...

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What Do Black Southern Cod Like to Eat?

Posted by on Aug 4, 2015 in Featured Posts, Science | 0 comments

What Do Black Southern Cod Like to Eat?

Spread the News:ShareIn the freezing waters of Patagonia, southern Chile, the black southern codfish takes what it can get. With different levels of salinity and nutrients at the mouths of fjords and channels, the black southern codfish maintains regional feeding habits, a new study has found. Researchers Matthias Hüne and Rodrigo Vega, from the Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity (IEB) and Fisheries Development Institute in Chile, collected fish samples in gill nets to observe and evaluate how the feeding pattern variation of black southern cod is influenced by oceanic and continental water in the Staples Strait in Captain Arancena Island and Puerto Bories in the Ultima Esperanza fjord. Since the black southern cod, an ice fish, is extremely abundant in Patagonia, Hüne and Vega wanted to better understand the trophic structure of the species, which will contribute a more complex understanding of the trophic ecology of fish in Chile. In the coming years, glacier melt is likely to reduce the salinity in surrounding oceans in these regions off southern South America. As a result, the diversity of prey species for the black southern cod will most likely be promoted, meaning that the oceanic food webs may become more complex. It is plausible that those fish will not be intensively affected by changing climate because they are highly adaptable to both higher temperature and lower salinity environments. By dissecting fish samples, the authors of the study were able to determine the diet composition of the species in selected regions. The authors investigated the spatial differentiation in diet composition of black southern cod by taking into consideration both environmental factors (salinity, temperature, oxygen concentration) and biological factors (gender, size). Through this study, they were able to develop a series of factors that predicts the spatial variation for the diet of the fish. Ultimately, Hüne and Vega ascertained that in Staples Strait, the black southern codfish primarily preys on polychaetes, multi-segmented worms that have fleshy bristles protruding from each segment and which are present from abyssal depth to rocky shores.In Puerto Bories, however, the black southern codfish preys mainly on algae and on crustaceans, including ostracods (“seed shrimp” with two shells that exist in almost all aquatic environments, including hot springs) and gammarids (shrimplike creatures which can swim upside-down, backwards or on their sides). Even though there is hardly any difference in the diet pattern among different sexes of the fish, small-sized black southern cod were found to have relatively lower proportion of empty stomachs. There is no doubt that environmental variables play a vital role in affecting the feeding variability of the black southern cod. Theoretically, the fish is prone to consume more diverse prey items where there is higher temperature and lower salinity, which accounts for the relatively high prey diversity in Puerto Bories. The adequacy of potential prey species could largely be attributed to suitable environmental conditions. According to Clarke and Johnston, the metabolic rate of fish in warm water is anticipated to be comparably higher, which could be an explanation for the phenomenon. Furthermore, the research found that small-sized black southern cod mainly prey near the surface of the ocean (or in benthic zone), where the majority of their food comes from ostracods and gammarids. Nevertheless, large-sized species spend most of their time in preying on polychaetes in the water column. Hence, there is no surprise that most of the black southern cod from Puerto Bories were smaller than specimens from Staples Strait. In conclusion, the black southern cod from different locations exhibits various feeding patterns, in which temperature and salinity of the ocean, as well as their physical condition, play an important role in shaping diet....

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Roundup: Fish in Patagonia, Film in Kashmir & Glacial Georgia

Posted by on Jun 29, 2015 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Featured Posts, News, Science, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Roundup: Fish in Patagonia, Film in Kashmir & Glacial Georgia

Spread the News:ShareOne Fish, Two Fish: Black Southern Cod maintain a more diverse diet when near glacier meltwater areas “The black southern cod, Patagonotothen tessellata, is the most important notothenioid fish species in terms of abundance in southern Chilean Patagonia. However, studies on its trophic ecology are scarce. [This study assessed] the spatial variation in the diet of P. tessellata between two localities, one with oceanic influence (Staples Strait) and another with continental influence (Puerto Bories)… The black southern cod presents spatial differences in diet composition among contrasting environmental localities… The results provide evidence of two dietary patterns depending on the type of environment in which they are distributed, highlighting the potential role of the environmental variables on the availability and abundance of potential prey and in structuring diet.” More here. Glaciers in the Spotlight: Salman Khan films dramatic scene at Thajwas glacier, Kashmir “No doubt Salman Khan’s films are incredible exciting and dramatic, but his forthcoming release ‘Bajrangi Bhaijaan’ has even gotten better… ‘The Bajrangi Bhaijaan climax was shot at the base of the Thajwas glacier outside Sonamarg. Located at 10,000 feet above sea level… the 300 strong technical crew had to trek for an hour through snow every morning to reach the location. Added to this was were the 7000 extras that we had on set every day. Transporting them in hundreds of buses and then embarking on the hour-long trek was a huge logistical challenge for the production. To add to their woes was the sub zero temperatures and hail storms that would interrupt the shoot,’ said Kabir Khan who has previously worked with Salman in ‘Ek Tha Tiger.’” Read more here.   Glacial Melt in Georgia, Communities Threatened by Avalanche “Considering its size, Georgia has a large number of glaciers. In the mountains of Georgia, there are about 786 registered glaciers, with a total area of about 550 km. About 82.5 % are in the upper courses of the Kodori, Inguri, Rioni, and Tereck rivers. For the past 150 years, significant glacier retreat (0.8–1.7 km) and shrinking of their area by 16 % has been observed. Since the middle of the 1940s, the glaciological situation has been characterized by a sharp reduction in the glacial area, but with the simultaneous increase in their number as glaciers disintegrated into separate smaller ones, although at the same time separate movements have also taken place. Avalanches are common in Georgia. Nearly 340 inhabited places are under the threat of avalanche attacks. About 31 % of the territory of Georgia is subject to avalanches (18 % in eastern and 13 % in western Georgia).” More here. Spread the...

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Roundup: New Museums, Ice Quakes, and Ice Caves

Posted by on Mar 16, 2015 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Featured Posts, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: New Museums, Ice Quakes, and Ice Caves

Spread the News:ShareGlaciarium – A New Museum Dedicated to Patagonian Glaciers Opens in Argentina “Designed as an environment that promotes knowledge and awakens the senses, Glaciarium seeks to emotionally move the visitor through noble visual and narrative resources . . .” Read More, here.   Calving Glaciers causing “Ice Quakes” Analysts at the Alaska Earthquake Center discovered that calving glaciers cam cause seismic readings of earthquakes. Read more, here.   New International Workshop on Ice Caves published by the National Cave and Karst Research Institute “International experts discuss ongoing research efforts and promote global cooperation in ice cave science and management. The 97-page proceedings of the 6th IWIC contain 20 high quality papers and abstracts that cover ice caves and glacier caves eight countries, three continents, and some extraterrestrial bodies. Topics include modeling, measuring, and monitoring of ice and glacier cave processes, microclimates, and cave ice, as well as the effects of climate change.” Read the report here.   Spread the...

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