Posts Tagged "pakistan"

Roundup: Gains and Losses in Glacial Economies

Posted by on Jul 4, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: Gains and Losses in Glacial Economies

Spread the News:ShareEach week, we highlight three stories from the forefront of glacier news. Why Are People Stealing and Selling Glaciers? From CARE2: A recent report describes a region in Asia in which people travel up to a glacier and remove ice blocks from it. The report states “Along the Chitral River in Pakistan, some locals are stealing and selling the glaciers that are melting in their backyard. Residents of the small town Chitral are not necessarily taking the glaciers because they want to — but rather as a matter of surviving dire energy and water shortages.” To learn more about the region’s energy and water crisis, click here.   Glaciers’ monitoring: Germany approves €6 million grant From The Express Tribune: “Germany has approved a grant of six million euros to monitor over 5,000 melting glaciers in Pakistan. The German government through its KfW Development Bank will provide the amount to the Water and Power Development Authority (Wapda) for a project ‘Glacial monitoring for energy and water security in Pakistan’ for telemetric equipment in lower stretches of glaciated areas.” Learn more about the grant and proposed project here.   Greenland’s wooden Icefjord Center will offer sweeping views of the glacial landscape From INHABITAT: “The Icefjord Center is an undulating wooden structure designed to offer spectacular views of a famous glacier in Greenland’s Sermermiut Valley. Conceived by Danish studio Dorte Mandrup Arkitekter, the building bridges the landscape while replicating the feeling of hiking across a fjord. When it opens, the center will provide space for residents, researchers and tourists to learn about climate change.” See more breathtaking photos of the Center and learn about its construction here. Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Studying Microbes on Glacier

Posted by on Jun 3, 2016 in Featured Posts, Images, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Studying Microbes on Glacier

Spread the News:ShareAny avid hiker or mountaineer would agree life as a scientist studying microbes on glaciers is not too bad. Just look the business trips they get to make. Italian scientists Dr. Andrea Franzetti, environmental microbiologist, and his colleague Dr. Roberto Ambrosini, ecologist, took a trip to Baltoro Glacier in Pakistan to collect data and bacteria samples for their latest work on supraglacial microbes. Temporary office (base camp) on Baltoro Glacier, Pakistan with Gasherbrum I in the background. K2, second highest mountain in the world, shot from Baltoro Glacier. Dr. Roberto Ambrosini taking measurements in cryoconite hole on Baltoro Glacier with Mitre Peak in the background. Checking instrumentation on Baltoro Glacier Spread the...

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Roundup: Modeling Floods, Water Security, and Farmland

Posted by on Feb 8, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, News, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: Modeling Floods, Water Security, and Farmland

Spread the News:ShareEach week, we highlight three stories from the forefront of glacier news.  Modeling glacial lake outburst flood process chain: the case of Lake Palcacocha and Huaraz, Peru From Hydrology and Earth System Sciences: “One of the consequences of recent glacier recession in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, is the risk of Glacial Lake Outburst Floods (GLOFs) from lakes that have formed at the base of retreating glaciers. GLOFs are often triggered by avalanches falling into 5 glacial lakes, initiating a chain of processes that may culminate in significant inundation and destruction downstream. This paper presents simulations of all of the processes involved in a potential GLOF originating from Lake Palcacocha, the source of a previously catastrophic GLOF on 13 December 1941, killing 1800 people in the city of Huaraz, Peru.” To learn more about the research, click here. Forum reveals new possibilities for water-induced disaster management in the Koshi basin From ICIMOD: “Top officials and experts from the Koshi region gathered in Patna, Bihar on Thursday for a two-day forum to discuss solutions around water security and water-induced disasters in the Koshi basin. Coming after years of devastating floods in southern Nepal and Bihar, the forum emphasised regional cooperation and collecting evidence-based data that can be translated into policy.” To learn more about the research, click here. The Changes in Regional Structure and Land Use Related to External Factors in Hussaini Village, Northern Pakistan From Mapping Transition in the Pamirs: “This study describes changes to regional structure and the use of farmlands in Hussaini village, Pakistan, caused by two events. The first event was the opening of the Karakoram Highway in 1978 that introduced commodities and a money market economy. The enhanced transportation increased access to markets, which spurred a transition from subsistence wheat cultivation and vegetable crops to potato cash crops. The second event was the catastrophic landslide in Atabad which occurred on 4 January 2010 that submerged part of the Karakoram Highway and created a dammed lake. The loss of the highway halted the village’s engagement in the wider agricultural market, and farmlands in the village reverted to traditional agriculture. The changes caused by these outside factors created confusion and disturbance and challenged the villagers to quickly adapt for survival.” To learn more about the research, click here. Spread the...

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Glacier Stars in New Bollywood Film

Posted by on Oct 27, 2015 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Featured Posts | 0 comments

Glacier Stars in New Bollywood Film

Spread the News:ShareIt is not unusual for the viewer of a Bollywood movie to be transported to the pyramids of Egypt, the Swiss Alps, or even the metropolis of midtown Manhattan, as the backdrop for actors’ most intense emotion–whether that is romantic love or a sense of being lost in the world. Recently, the Thajiwas glacier, in disputed territory between India and Pakistan, became the set for Bajrangi Bhaijan, a Bollywood movie that explores relations between the two countries through the story of a young girl and a good Samaritan. The movie, released this summer, stars Salman Khan and is directed by Kabir Khan. It tells of the heroic quest of Pawan (played by Salman Khan) to return a lost young girl to her parents. But Shahida, the young girl, (played by Harshaali Malhotra), cannot speak—she is mute. As Pawan and Shahida journey, Pawan must try to communicate with her and find out where she is from. He eventually learns that he must go to Pakistan to return Shahida to her family. Shahida’s home is in the Pakistani Himalayas, but to get there, she and Pawan must cross through the varied geography of India, from the Thar Desert in the north of the country, to the mountainous region near the Thajiwas. The greenery of mountain grasses combined with the snow-covered Himalayas has been referred to as “Asia’s Switzerland”—Shahida actually tries to communicate where she is from with a photo of what turns out to be Switzerland during the movie. Once he gets close to Shahida’s home, Pawan is captured by the Pakistani authorities, whom he defied by illegally crossing the border. A Pakistani security agent is forced to confront a conflict between the justice of Pawan’s mission and his duty to his higher ups–corrupt government bureaucrats who want to portray Pawan as an Indian black agent. He decides to let Pawan go. Pawan is escorted by thousands of supporters who force the border agents, at a made-up border crossing at the Thajiwas, to let Pawan return. In reality, the Thajiwas glacier, and the locations where the scenery were filmed, are located in India, not Pakistan. The region is in the state of Jammu and Kashmir, which is a disputed area between India and Pakistan (GlacierHub in 2014 covered the conflict between India and Pakistan in glacier-covered territory here and here). The relationship between the two countries and the competing religious identities is a major theme of the movie. The beautiful scenery is depicted as belonging to both countries and being part of a shared cultural heritage, challenging the political status quo. The Himalayas are shared between India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Nepal, China, and Bhutan, so this region is vulnerable to the political instability between these countries. However, tension between these countries does not deter tourists, who flocked to the Kashmir Valley at a rate of 1.4 million in 2011/2012. The Thajiwas glacier and its nearby town of Sonamarg are major tourist attractions, with sledding and pony rides that enable tourists to explore the region, which is inaccessible to cars after a certain point. The movie shows the beauty of this area as well as the surrounding landscape, including the alpine forests, which draw tourists every year. The local economy depends on these tourist dollars, which generally come in during the summer. Filming in this location presented logistical challenges due to the elevation and accessibility. The scene shot at the glacier involved 7,000 extras, who needed to be transported to the area. Though the movie depicts the area as a border crossing, there is no actual crossing there, and a combination of...

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India PM Modi Visits World’s Highest Battleground

Posted by on Oct 26, 2014 in All Posts, Featured Posts, News, Policy and Economics | 0 comments

India PM Modi Visits World’s Highest Battleground

Spread the News:ShareOn October 23, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi visited the Siachen Glacier lauding the Indian soldiers based there. Modi tweeted “From the icy heights of the Siachen Glacier and with the brave jawans and officers of the armed forces, I wish all of you a happy Diwali.” Sharing sweets with our Jawans at Siachen. pic.twitter.com/ebHWkRwe3e — Narendra Modi (@narendramodi) October 23, 2014 The Indian soldiers are based in heights of 22,000 ft above sea level on the Siachen Glacier. Both sides have lost thousands of personnel, not in combat, but primarily due to frostbite, avalanche and other hazards in this harsh region. Read more on the India Pakistan dispute of Siachen Glacier here. Modi’s visit to Siachen Glacier was right after the two sides exchanged gunfire and the 2003 ceasefire was violated. Just this past month, intense gunfire exchange in Kashmir cost 20 civilian lives and wounded dozens. Media interpreted Modi’s Siachen Glacier visit as a message for Pakistan that the status of the disputed border areas is “non-negotiable”. Diwali is, the “festival of lights”, the largest South Asian holiday of Hindu origins, celebrating the victory of light over darkness. Happy Diwali! Addressing our brave Jawans at Siachen Base Camp. pic.twitter.com/a8an1UvPPT — Narendra Modi (@narendramodi) October 23, 2014 Spread the...

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