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  • Photo Friday: NASA IceBridge launches 2017 Antarctica campaigns

    This Friday, enjoy some images of glaciers from a recent NASA IceBridge flight. The IceBridge project began its 9th year by launching two flights from two continents (South America and Antarctica).

  • Photo Friday: Island Glaciers of the Canadian Arctic

    Outside of Greenland, a quarter of the Arctic’s ice lies in Canada, much of it covering the Queen Elizabeth Islands. A recent paper in Environmental Research Letters found that, during the decade between 2005 and 2015, surface melt from the ice caps and glaciers of the Queen Elizabeth Islands increased by a staggering 900 percent,…

  • Photo Friday: The Shrinking Patagonian Icefield

    Typically obscured by cloud cover and mist, it is difficult to study the glaciers of the Southern Patagonian Icefield from space. However, on April 29, May 1, and May 24, 2016, NASA satellites captured clear images of the glaciers. Compiled into striking mosaics, this data reveals a great deal about the shrinking icefield. For example,…

  • Photo Friday: The Melting Glaciers of Patagonia

    The Patagonia region receives up to four meters (160 inches) of rain and snow per year, making it one of the wettest and windiest regions on Earth. Unfortunately, the Patagonian glaciers have been shrinking at an accelerated rate over the last century, leaving scientists to battle intense weather conditions to understand why. Studies show, for…

  • OMG: An Artist Flew over the Greenland Icesheet

    In a recent article in Nature Climate Change, Sonja van Renssen describes various mediums through which visual artists and musicians represent climate change. She argues that illustrating climate change through art can ground it in our culture and open up new dialogues. She offers several examples, including Justin Brice Guariglia, who recently became the first artist in history to…

  • Photo Friday: Antarctic Glaciers Monitored by NASA

    As the world’s fifth largest continent, Antarctica provides a unique record of the Earth’s past climate through its geomorphological record of glacier moraines. Antarctic glaciers terminate on land or in the sea as either floating ice shelves or grounded or floating outlet glaciers. As such, numerous climate scientists are conducting research about the ice shelf and glacier landforms in the…

  • NASA’s IceBridge Project- More Than Just a Pretty Image

    NASA’s IceBridge project looks at Earth’s polar regions in the largest ever collection of images taken from air. As NASA states, “These flights will provide a yearly, multi-instrument look at the behavior of the rapidly changing features of the Greenland and Antarctic ice.” The speed of ice and glacial melt continues to surprise scientists. This…

  • Photo Friday: Tibetan Plateau From Space

    55 million years ago, a major collision took place between two of the large blocks that form the Earth’s crust. The Indian Plate pushed into the Eurasian Plate, creating what is known as the Tibetan Plateau. The region, also known as the “Third Pole,” spans a million square miles and contains the largest amount of glacier ice…

  • Photo Friday: Volcanoes of the Kamchatka Peninsula

    The Kamchatka Peninsula, located in remote Far East Russia, is part of the “Ring of Fire” and is known for its volcanic activity. The 102,400 square mile region has the highest concentration of active volcanoes in the world. The Klyuchevskoy volcano is one of the seven active glacier-capped volcanoes in the remote region. At a towering…

  • Roundup: Glacial Melt, Photos, and Disasters

    Each week, we highlight three stories from the forefront of glacier news. The Climate Post: Melting of Totten Glacier Could Trigger 6 Foot Sea-Level Rise From Huffpost Green: “A new study published in the journal Nature is drawing attention to the effect of warming water on the world’s largest ice mass, Totten Glacier in East Antarctica. Melting of…