Posts Tagged "himalaya"

Roundup: Glacier Retreat, Mountain Advocacy, and Precipitation

Posted by on Dec 26, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: Glacier Retreat, Mountain Advocacy, and Precipitation

Spread the News:ShareRoundup:  Glacier Retreat, César Portocarrero and Precipitation   Centennial-Scale Glacier Retreat From Nature Geoscience: “The near-global retreat of glaciers over the last century provides some of the most iconic imagery for communicating the reality of anthropogenic climate change to the public. Surprisingly, however, there has not been a quantitative foundation for attributing the retreats to climate change, except in the global aggregate. This gap, between public perception and scientific basis, is due to uncertainties in numerical modelling and the short length of glacier mass-balance records… We demonstrate that observed retreats of individual glaciers represent some of the highest signal-to-noise ratios of climate change yet documented. Therefore, in many places, the centennial-scale retreat of the local glaciers does indeed constitute categorical evidence of climate change.” Learn more about new climate discoveries here:   2016 Sir Edmund Hillary Mountain Legacy Medal From hillarymedal.com: On December 11, 2016, César Portocarrero of Cusco, Peru, received the 2017 Sir Edmund Hillary Mountain Legacy Medal, the world’s most prestigious award for mountain advocacy. The theme of the presentation event, which took place in Kathmandu, was Science and Survival: Mountain Livelihoods, Recreation and Environments. According to the award announcement, “César Portocarrero has directed projects to mitigate the danger of outburst floods from numerous glacial lakes in the Andes, saving thousands of lives and many millions of dollars, and he is now sharing his expertise with members of the High Mountain Adaptation Partnership (HiMAP), including Nepal, Bhutan, and several Central Asian nations.” Read more about the 2016 award winner here:   Precipitation Over the Himalaya From Climate Dynamics: The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to simulate the spatiotemporal distribution of precipitation over central Asia over the year April 2005 through March 2006. Experiments are performed at 6.7 km horizontal grid spacing, with an emphasis on winter and summer precipitation over the Himalaya. The model and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission show a similar inter-seasonal cycle of precipitation, from extratropical cyclones to monsoon precipitation, with agreement also in the diurnal cycle of monsoon precipitation… These results indicate that WRF provides skillful simulations of precipitation relevant for studies of water resources over the complex terrain in the Himalaya.” Read more about the WRF model here: Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Thanksgiving Dinner and High Altitude Meals

Posted by on Nov 25, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Thanksgiving Dinner and High Altitude Meals

Spread the News:ShareIn the United States, the Thanksgiving holiday represents a day to give thanks for all of our blessings and signals the beginning of the winter holiday season. The day is often celebrated with a traditional turkey dinner in the company of family and friends. In the spirit of Thanksgiving’s gastronomical tradition, GlacierHub took a look at the types of food consumed by climbers on expeditions in high-altitude glacial environments. Eating properly on and before a strenuous climb is an essential part of any successful ascent. After finishing your pumpkin pie this holiday season, take a look at some of the meals consumed at high elevations from some amazing glacial regions:                                   Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Tibetan Plateau From Space

Posted by on Jul 15, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Tibetan Plateau From Space

Spread the News:Share55 million years ago, a major collision took place between two of the large blocks that form the Earth’s crust. The Indian Plate pushed into the Eurasian Plate, creating what is known as the Tibetan Plateau. The region, also known as the “Third Pole,” spans a million square miles and contains the largest amount of glacier ice outside of the poles. A photograph of the southern Tibetan Plateau taken from space was released June 17th, showing the dramatic topography in false color. The photograph, taken by the Sentinel-2A, was captured near Nepal and Sikkim, a northern state of India, on February 1st. According to the European Space Agency (ESA), “From their vantage point 800 km high, satellites can monitor changes in glacier mass, melting and other effects that climate change has on our planet.” This week, enjoy stunning satellite pictures of the Tibetan Plateau over time. NASA also has taken photographs of the same plate collision from space, showing the snow-capped Himalayas, which are still rising. A true-color image of the Tibetan Plateau, taken in 2003 by NASA’S MODIS Rapid Response Team, shows the region’s lakes as dark patches against the sand-colored mountains. Prior to the true-color photograph, a spaceborne radar image of the Himalayan Mountains was taken in 1994 in southeast Tibet. Each color is assigned to a different radar frequency that depends of the direction that the radar was transmitted. Spread the...

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Do Village Traditions Trump Adaptation?

Posted by on Dec 22, 2015 in Adaptation, All Posts, Communities, Featured Posts, Policy and Economics, Tourism | 0 comments

Do Village Traditions Trump Adaptation?

Spread the News:ShareThe village of Manang, high in the Himalayas in Nepal, is using economic diversification to stave off the effects of climate change, but will soon reach a point where more adaptation is needed, Katie Konchar and her coauthors warned in a new study in the Journal of Ethnobiology. The team used semi-structured interviews and innovative photography techniques to gain insight on current village perceptions and adaptations. Nearly three-quarters of respondents perceived increased temperatures especially during the winter months – consistent with the regional instrumental observations. The uniquely structured interview style allowed for more detailed responses. For example, one villager stated “[b]efore in winter water was ice; now we can easily wash our face in winter.” The authors argue that the unique ecological knowledge of locals is vital to the development of placed based adaptation plans. Villagers offered a variety of explanations for climate change: CO2 concentrations, pollution, or development, while others, usually the elders, believed it was due to actions of gods. One of the participants who mentioned CO2 was part of an outreach program by the Annapurna Conservation Area to educate the villagers on the effects of climate change. The village relies heavily on glacier meltwater for its traditional agriculture economy, since it is in the rain shadow of one of the tallest mountains in the world, Annapurna, so that seasonal rainfall is insufficient for raising crops. This region has seen a change in the predictability of rain, leading to an abnormally varied growing season. Though the increased temperatures and varied rain make it difficult to maintain their traditional agriculture, the participants pointed to an increase in cash crop such as vegetables as one of the most important changes in their livelihoods. The authors state that the transition from traditional crops–chiefly grains and potatoes, adapted to cold climates–to milder climate cash crops is an important step to adapting to climate change. Tourism has also increased ,due to improved transportation in the area which allows foreigners to trek into the area, helping to diversify the economy even further. The authors point to the diversification as an important adaptation, but they also warn of future dangers in an even warmer climate. Glacier retreat could lead to decreased water availability, less attractive scenery to attract tourists, increased glacial lake flooding and an unreliable traditional agricultural calendar. The authors argue that the traditional practices, reinforced by spiritual lamas, need to adapt alongside the economic changes already being seen. The interviews in this study were validated in part by a unique technique of repeat photography-pictures taken during the week of interviews were compared to historical pictures to see climatic changes. These “… photographs illustrate the changes in woody vegetation coverage surrounding the village, the increase in the size of Gangapurna Lake [due to increased glacial melt], and the rapid retreat of the Gangapurna Glacier highlighted during interviews.” Though the authors applaud the villager’s added economic resilience of planting more cash crops and increased focus on tourism, they say there will come a point when the agricultural society will not be able to live off of the glacier meltwater or rain seasons that they traditionally depend on, and need to start adapting at an even quicker pace. “Continued development of relevant, place-based adaptations to rapid Himalayan climate change depends on local peoples’ ability to understand the potential impacts of climate change and to adjust within complex, traditional socio-ecological systems.” Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Exploring Imja Tsho in Nepal

Posted by on Oct 16, 2015 in All Posts, Experiences, Featured Posts, Images | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Exploring Imja Tsho in Nepal

Spread the News:ShareCheck out photos of Imja Tsho (or Imja Lake), a glacial lake created by the accumulation of meltwater at the foot of the Imja Glacier in the Himalayas in Nepal. The meltwater, located at the toe of both the Imja and Lhotse Shar glaciers, is held in place by a terminal moraine. Enjoy the landscape and aerial views below of this Himalayan glacier lake. Imja Lake Imja Lake surrounded by a lake outlet channel, ponds, an ablation valley. Courtesy of Wikipedia. Imja Lake and Glacier Where Imja Lake meets Imja Glacier. Courtesy of Wikipedia. Lhotse The South Face of Lhotse from Imja lake. Inja Lake An overhead view of Inja Lake     Spread the...

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