Posts Tagged "greenland"

Roundup: Peruvian Climate, Tibetan Lakes, and Greenland’s Glaciers

Posted by on Jan 2, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: Peruvian Climate, Tibetan Lakes, and Greenland’s Glaciers

Spread the News:ShareRoundup: Peru, Tibet and Greenland   Project to Improve Climate Services in Peru From Climate Services: “CLIMANDES is a pilot twinning project between the National Weather Services of Peru and Switzerland (SENAMHI and MeteoSwiss), developed within the Global Framework for Climate Services of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Split in two modules, CLIMANDES aims at improving education in meteorology and climatology in support of the WMO Regional Training Center in Peru, and introducing user-tailored climate services in two pilot regions in the Peruvian Andes… The efforts accomplished within CLIMANDES improved the quality of the climate services provided by SENAMHI.” Read more about CLIMANDES here.   Monitoring Lake Levels on the Tibetan Plateau From Journal of Hydrology: “Lakes on the Tibetan Plateau (TP) are of great interest due to their value as water resources but also as an important indicator of climate change. However, in situ data in this region are extremely scarce and only a few lakes have gauge measurements… In this study, Cryosat-2 SARIn mode data over the period 2010–2015 are used to investigate recent lake level variations… Lakes in the northern part of the TP experienced pronounced rising (avg. 0.37 ± 0.10 m/yr), while lakes in southern part were steady or decreasing even in glaciated basins with high precipitation… These results demonstrate that lakes on the TP are still rapidly changing under climate change, especially in northern part of the TP, but the driving factors are variable and more research is needed.” Learn more about climate change on the Tibetan Plateau here.   Data Portal to Study Greenland’s Ice Sheet From Eos: “A new web-based data portal gives scientists access to more than 40 years of satellite imagery, providing seasonal to long-term insights into outflows from Greenland’s ice sheet… This portal harnesses more than 37,000 images from Landsat archives, dating back to the early 1970s, to track changes in outlet glaciers over time… Through analyzing data from this portal, we can see in great detail how several outlet glaciers are speeding up their treks to the sea. What’s more, any user can access the data to conduct their own studies of glacier behavior at Greenland’s coasts through time.” Read more about Greenland’s retreating glaciers here: Spread the...

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NASA’s IceBridge Project- More Than Just a Pretty Image

Posted by on Nov 4, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images | 0 comments

NASA’s IceBridge Project- More Than Just a Pretty Image

Spread the News:ShareNASA’s IceBridge project looks at Earth’s polar regions in the largest ever collection of images taken from air. As NASA states, “These flights will provide a yearly, multi-instrument look at the behavior of the rapidly changing features of the Greenland and Antarctic ice.” The speed of ice and glacial melt continues to surprise scientists. This project will provide a unique and informative three-dimensional view. Currently information is being collected by regional observation and satellite data collected from NASA’s Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat).  Being able to pair this data with the new three-dimensional images could lead to crucial advances in the field.                       Spread the...

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Glimpsing the Arctic: A Conversation with Artist Mariele Neudecker

Posted by on Aug 16, 2016 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Featured Posts, Images, Interviews | 0 comments

Glimpsing the Arctic: A Conversation with Artist Mariele Neudecker

Spread the News:ShareMany people may never see a glacier or an iceberg up close, given issues of cost, inaccessibility and environmental changes. Yet artist Mariele Neudecker is making the experience a bit more accessible, as she transports a vision of the Arctic to galleries and museum floors. Born in Düsseldorf, Germany, the 51-year-old lifelong artist now resides in Bristol, where she creates sculptures, photographs, films and paintings.  Over the past 20 years, Neudecker has produced a wide range of landscape and still life artwork, much of which seeks to capture the essence of glaciers and icebergs. Recently, a selection of Neudecker’s Arctic-focused art was the center of her exhibit, Some Things Happen All At Once, at the Zeppelin Museum in Friedrichshafen, Germany.  Additionally, four copies of her photographs were featured at Project Pressure’s Outdoor Installation, which GlacierHub recently covered in August. In an interview with GlacierHub, Neudecker walks us through the journey behind her glacier artwork.  A condensed and edited version of the conversation follows.   GH:  I understand the Zeppelin Museum installation is not the first project you have done focusing on glaciers. MN: I have done a lot of work with [19th century landscape painter] Caspar David Friedrich paintings and converting them into 3D tank pieces.  The first one I did in 1997 was clearly using ice in a reference to his painting “Sea of Ice.”   GH: What attracted you to ice and glacier themed art back in 1997, when you first incorporated Arctic ice elements into your artwork? MN: It [my work] was more of an exploration of landscapes. I looked at mountains, forests and the ocean.  However, I always thought the remoteness and difficulty to imagine the Arctic created an interesting perception… It is about the subject of glaciers and the Arctic, but fundamentally it’s about perceptions and how we have longings to be somewhere else.  You can transport people to other places through paintings, films and all sorts of artwork. The Arctic has always been a metaphor for climate change and human shortcomings, so there are a lot of cliché images of glaciers representing the environment.  That has provoked me to add other layers to that representation.  The challenge is to avoid the clichés.   GH:  What was the most difficult feeling to capture that you wanted to convey to viewers? MN: I wanted to hint at the unknown and to highlight that all we see are little fragments of something much bigger.  It’s hard to capture the feeling of standing in massive open spaces where you are trapped in your eye sockets and you must turn your head to take it all in. It’s similar to deep sea projects I have done, where the camera is in the black depths of the ocean and only with artificial light can you see a fraction of the spaces. You know how massive the space is, but you only see a tiny piece of it.   GH: What was the most surprising to you when you were out in the field capturing glaciers? MN: The sound! That really threw me. I had no idea how loud they were.  Camping on the side of a glacier the silence and then the sounds that interrupted that silence were so powerful.  I’ve seen a million images of glaciers, but no one told me about the sounds. I tried to record them but I wasn’t able to capture it well.  That would be a future project I would love to do.   GH: Before you went to Greenland, all of your Arctic work was derived from images and paintings....

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Roundup: Antarctica and Greenland in peril, black carbon

Posted by on Jul 25, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Roundup, Science, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Roundup: Antarctica and Greenland in peril, black carbon

Spread the News:ShareNinety percent of the western Antarctic Peninsula’s glaciers are retreating From Carbon Brief: “These rivers of ice ooze their way down through the Peninsula’s rocky mountain range and into the ocean, powered by gravity and their own weight. But of the 674 glaciers on the Peninsula’s western side, almost 90% are retreating. This happens when their ice melts faster than new snowfall can replenish it. “The Antarctic Peninsula is one of the fastest warming regions on Earth. Temperatures have risen by more than 3C over the past 50 years. The warming atmosphere has caused some remarkable changes to the eastern side of the Peninsula. The Larsen ice shelf, a floating sheet of ice formed from glaciers spilling out onto the cold ocean, has lost two of its four sections in recent decades.” Learn more about the Antarctic Peninsula’s glaciers and effects on the ocean here.   Greenland lost a mind-blowing 1 trillion tons of ice in under four years From Washington Post: “It’s the latest story in a long series of increasingly worrisome studies on ice loss in Greenland. Research already suggests that the ice sheet has lost at least 9 trillion tons of ice in the past century and that the rate of loss has increased over time. Climate scientists are keeping a close eye on the region because of its potentially huge contributions to future sea-level rise (around 20 feet if the whole thing were to melt) — not to mention the damage it’s already done. Ice loss from Greenland may have contributed as much as a full inch of sea-level rise in the last 100 years and up to 10 percent of all the sea-level rise that’s been documented since the 1990s. “Overall, the ice loss was particularly prevalent in the southwest, but the scientists noted that there were also losses observed in the cooler, northern parts of the ice sheet. Notably, the researchers also found that a solid 12 percent of all the ice loss came from just a handful of glaciers composing less than 1 percent of the ice sheet’s total area.” Read more here.   Understanding black carbon impact on glaciers From International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD): “In April 2016 and team of glaciologists and experts from the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development’s (ICIMOD) and partner organisations — Department of Hydrology and Meteorology, Utrecht University, Kathmandu University (KU),Tribhuvan University (TU), Norwegian Water Resources and Energy Directorate (NVI) went to Langtang for a field visit. “‘The elevation of Yala Glacier is higher compared to those in Pakistan. Gulkin Glacier, in Pakistan, starts from 2700 to 4000 m, so there was almost no snow on the glacier in this season. Only towards the top of the glacier at around 4000m AMSL snow was present. The rest of the glacier was mostly debris’, Chaman said. Sachin Glacier, at 3200- 4000m AMSL, is different to Yala and Gulkin, and samples collected from this glacier represent semi-aged or aged-snow. ‘There was fresh snow on the night of collection so the samples were very fresh’  Chaman said of Langtang. He expects to see large variability in black carbon concentrations in the samples, contributing to effect of elevation, geographical location, glacier type, age and fresh samples.” Learn more here.   Spread the...

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Roundup: Gains and Losses in Glacial Economies

Posted by on Jul 4, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: Gains and Losses in Glacial Economies

Spread the News:ShareEach week, we highlight three stories from the forefront of glacier news. Why Are People Stealing and Selling Glaciers? From CARE2: A recent report describes a region in Asia in which people travel up to a glacier and remove ice blocks from it. The report states “Along the Chitral River in Pakistan, some locals are stealing and selling the glaciers that are melting in their backyard. Residents of the small town Chitral are not necessarily taking the glaciers because they want to — but rather as a matter of surviving dire energy and water shortages.” To learn more about the region’s energy and water crisis, click here.   Glaciers’ monitoring: Germany approves €6 million grant From The Express Tribune: “Germany has approved a grant of six million euros to monitor over 5,000 melting glaciers in Pakistan. The German government through its KfW Development Bank will provide the amount to the Water and Power Development Authority (Wapda) for a project ‘Glacial monitoring for energy and water security in Pakistan’ for telemetric equipment in lower stretches of glaciated areas.” Learn more about the grant and proposed project here.   Greenland’s wooden Icefjord Center will offer sweeping views of the glacial landscape From INHABITAT: “The Icefjord Center is an undulating wooden structure designed to offer spectacular views of a famous glacier in Greenland’s Sermermiut Valley. Conceived by Danish studio Dorte Mandrup Arkitekter, the building bridges the landscape while replicating the feeling of hiking across a fjord. When it opens, the center will provide space for residents, researchers and tourists to learn about climate change.” See more breathtaking photos of the Center and learn about its construction here. Spread the...

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