Posts Tagged "glaciers"

Round Up: Sounds of Glacier Bay, A New Book, and a Caving Video

Posted by on Feb 2, 2015 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Roundup | 0 comments

Round Up: Sounds of Glacier Bay, A New Book, and a Caving Video

Spread the News:Share“Voices of Glacier Bay” Soundscape Project The National Park Service has a new project recording various sounds of nature in Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska. The recordings include sounds of: calving glaciers, humpback whales, singing birds, raindrop polyrhythms, and more! http://glacierhub.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Calving-Glacier.wma Check out their website, with tons more sounds and videos.   Over 150 scientists collaborated on a new comprehensive book on glaciers The GLIMS (Global Land Ice Measurements from Space)  project started over 20 years ago to record glacier movement using satellites. The largely never before seen data has been put together in a new comprehensive book by the same name which unquestionably confirms the shrinking of earth’s glaciers. Read about the project, and the book, here Extreme ice caving video filmed at Buer Glacier, Norway Extreme sports buff and outdoor guide Sander Cruiming took his crew and cameras ice caving through Norway’s Buer Glacier. Read more, here. Spread the...

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Roundup: New Stories on Black Carbon

Posted by on Jan 26, 2015 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images, News, Science | 0 comments

Roundup: New Stories on Black Carbon

Spread the News:ShareWe feature three stories, all of which focus on black carbon. This atmospheric pollutant plays an important role in accelerating glacier retreat. Moreover, policies can be designed to reduce it, by supporting alternative fuels and improved technologies. Reductions in black carbon also bring health benefits, since this substance leads to pulmonary diseases. Story 1: Ice Core Data from Svalbard “The inner part of a 125 m deep ice core from Holtedahlfonna glacier (79◦8 N, 13◦2 E, 1150 m a.s.l.) was melted, filtered through a quartz fibre filter and analysed for EC using a thermal–optical method. The EC values started to increase after 1850 and peaked around 1910, similar to ice core records from Greenland. Strikingly, the EC values again increase rapidly between 1970 and 2004 after a temporary low point around 1970, reaching unprecedented values in the 1990s. This rise is not seen in Greenland ice cores, and it seems to contradict atmospheric BC measurements indicating generally decreasing atmospheric BC concentrations since 1989 in the Arctic.” Read more about this research here.   Story 2: Black Carbon over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau “Black carbon (BC) particles over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau (HTP), both airborne and those deposited on snow, have been shown to affect snowmelt and glacier retreat. Since BC over the HTP may originate from a variety of geographical regions 5 and emission sectors, it is essential to quantify the source–receptor relationships of BC in order to understand the contributions of natural and anthropogenic emissions and provide guidance for potential mitigation actions. ” Read more about this research here.   Story 3: Modeling of Climatic and Hydrological Impacts “Light absorbing particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, brown carbon, and dust) influence water and energy budgets of the atmosphere and snowpack in multiple ways. In addition to their effects associated with atmospheric heating by absorption of solar radiation and interactions with clouds, LAP in snow on land and ice can reduce the surface reflectance (a.k.a., surface darkening), which is likely to accelerate the snow aging process and further reduces snow albedo and increases the speed of snowpack melt. LAP in snow and ice (LAPSI) has been identified as one of major forcings affecting climate change, e.g. in the fourth and fifth assessment reports of IPCC. However, the uncertainty level in quantifying this effect remains very high.” Read more about this research here.   Spread the...

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Photo Friday: The Frozen Diamonds in Patagonia

Posted by on Oct 10, 2014 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Featured Posts, Images, News | 1 comment

Photo Friday: The Frozen Diamonds in Patagonia

Spread the News:ShareA Glaciers Photo Contest was held last summer by ViewBug and Resource Magazine. It is difficult to capture galciers due to the size, location, and reflection of light. However, the winner of this contest, Paul Cashman, mastered the task with “The Coldest Shots of Patagonia“. In order to well capture these cold giants, he traveled to Torres Del Paine and Mount Fitzroy in Chile and Argentina where most of the pictures were taken. Check out the wining photo of Paul Cashman and more photos for this project, or visit his website. Photo Friday highlights photo essays and collections from areas with glaciers. If you have photos you’d like to share, let us know in the comments, by Twitter @glacierhub or email us at glacierhub@gmail.com. Perito Moreno Glacier The Coldest Shots of Patagonia (source: © Paul Cashman) Perito Moreno Glacier Glaciers Photo Contest Winning Photo (source: © Paul Cashman) Perito Moreno Glacier The Coldest Shots of Patagonia (source: © Paul Cashman) Perito Moreno Glacier The Coldest Shots of Patagonia (source: © Paul Cashman) Perito Moreno Glacier The Coldest Shots of Patagonia (source: © Paul Cashman) Perito Moreno Glacier The Coldest Shots of Patagonia (source: © Paul Cashman) Perito Moreno Glacier The Coldest Shots of Patagonia (source: © Paul Cashman) Perito Moreno Glacier The Coldest Shots of Patagonia (source: © Paul Cashman) Spread the...

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When glaciers appeared in a galaxy far, far away

Posted by on Sep 4, 2014 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Communities, Featured Posts, Tourism | 0 comments

When glaciers appeared in a galaxy far, far away

Spread the News:ShareRabid Star Wars and glaciologists share at least one thing in common. They both know about the Hardangerjøkulen Glacier in Norway, where scenes set snow planet of Hoth were shot for The Empire Strikes Back. The possibility of returning to Hoth in the new Star Wars movie has been circulating the Internet rumor mill for a few months now, and even in the age of blue screen and CGI effects, there’s something to be said about shooting on location, on a glacier itself, as the first of the series’ sequels did in 1979. Norway’s claim to fame dates to March of that year when crews shooting The Empire Strikes Back were based in the town of Finse during the filming of scenes set on the frozen planet Hoth. The nearby Hardangerjøkulen Glacier was used near the beginning of the film during the battle scene between Luke Skywalker’s Rebel Alliance and Darth Vader’s Imperial forces. Filming during Norwegian wintertime wasn’t the easiest. When the worst winter storm in 50 years hit the area, it trapped the production crew in their hotel in Finse. Not to lose any time, they shot a scene of Luke Skywalker escaping from an ice monster’s cave by sending actor Mark Hamill out the hotel door into the cold, while the cameras and crew remained warmly inside. The village of Finse is so remote that no public roads connect it to the rest of Norway, only a railway. The glacier itself is located in a national park and tourists must travel there not only with special permission, but also a guide that can help them avoid dangerous crevasses. There is a small group of superfans who make the trek out to whatever Earth-related locations stood in for the galaxy far, far away. Brandon Alinger, who has visited several other Star Wars filming sites, recently made the trip up to Finse, but not before stopping in London to chat with Empire Strikes Back location manager Phillip Kohler. “We went up [on these trails] when we were on the recce (film slang for reconnaissance trip), on snow cats,” Brandon recalls Kohler telling him. “We told the driver in front, ‘If you don’t know the way, don’t leave the route, don’t let the guys tell you they want to go to the left’, because it looks safe! So what do they do? We see the snow-cat turn left, turn right, and it suddenly stopped. And the director got out and went straight down on his right leg. We said, ‘told ya, it’s all crevasses.’” The Hardangerjøkulen Glacier isn’t the only Star Wars location difficult for tourists to visit. Production crews have used Tunisa multiple times as the setting for Luke Skywalker’s desert homeworld Tatooine. Recently shifting Saharan sands threaten to cover old filming sets, and the Arab Spring uprisings have scared tourists away. Those looking to travel to Hoth without leaving their front door can find plenty of glacier-inspired Star Wars work. Artist James W. Rook, for example, imagined what it might be like if melting ice revealed a long-missing prop, in this case a crashed rebel snowspeeder. The elements from the Norwegian glacier and surrounding area are even incorporated into Angry Birds Star Wars. As long as Star Wars exists, in some form or another, so will Norway’s glaciers. Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Glaciers from above

Posted by on Jul 18, 2014 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images | 2 comments

Photo Friday: Glaciers from above

Spread the News:Share  Astronauts aboard the International Space Station took this picture of the space shuttle Atlantis’ STS-132 mission as it flew over a glacier in Chile and Argentina. (NASA) The Siachen glacier as seen in 2011. The 76 km long glacier is sometimes called a “white snake”. Spread the...

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