Posts Tagged "glacier national park"

Roundup: Glacier Park, Lahars, and Glacial Ecosystems

Posted by on Mar 6, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, News, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: Glacier Park, Lahars, and Glacial Ecosystems

Spread the News:ShareRoundup: Glacier Park, Lahars and Ecosystems Glacier National Park Embraces Sustainability From Xanterra: “Just 150 years ago, 150 glaciers graced these spectacular alpine summits. Only 25 remain large enough today to be considered ‘functional,’ say scientists who expect the park’s glaciers to vanish by 2030, with many disappearing before that. People heeding the advice to visit soon will find a variety of national park lodging and dining spots that are making environmental stewardship part of the park experience.” Read more about it here.     Washington State’s Lahar Preparedness From Journal of Applied Volcanology: “As populations around the world encroach upon the flanks of nearby volcanoes, an increasing number of people find themselves living at risk from volcanic hazards. How these individuals respond to the threats posed by volcanic hazards influences the effectiveness of official hazard mitigation, response, and recovery efforts. Ideally, those who are aware of the hazards and concerned should feel motivated to become better prepared; however, research repeatedly shows that an accurate risk perception often fails to generate adequate preparedness… This study explores the barriers that people in the Skagit Valley of Washington face when deciding whether or not to prepare for lahars as well as the impact of participation in hazard management on household preparedness behaviors.” Read more about Washington’s lahar preparedness here.   How Changing Climate Affects Ecosystems From Environmental Research Letters: “Climate change is undeniably occurring across the globe, with warmer temperatures and climate and weather disruptions in diverse ecosystems (IPCC 2013, 2014). In the Arctic and Subarctic, climate change has proceeded at a particularly breakneck pace (ACIA 2005)… However, climate warming is forecast to be even more extreme in the future. In order to predict the impacts of further global change, experiments have simulated these future conditions by warming the air and/or soil, increasing CO2 levels, altering nutrient fertilization, modifying precipitation, or manipulating snow cover and snowmelt timing (Elmendorf et al 2015, Wu et al 2011, Bobbink et al 2010, Cooper 2014). Changes in biodiversity at high latitudes are expected to have profound impacts on ecosystem functioning, processes, and services (Post et al 2009).” Read more about how changing climate affects ecosystems here. Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Sperry Glacier

Posted by on Feb 24, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Sperry Glacier

Spread the News:ShareSperry Glacier is located 25 miles south of the border between the United States and Canada, in Montana’s Glacier National Park. It is a winter-accumulation glacier, as more snow falls during the winter than is lost during the summer. The moderate-sized glacier can be reached by foot or on horseback, rising to an elevation of around 7,800 feet. The glacier was named for doctor Lyman Beecher Sperry, who in 1894 reasoned that the glacier was the cause of the cloudiness of the water in Avalanche Lake. When Sperry and his party first reached the glacier in 1897, his nephew Albert Sperry had this reaction after viewing the glacier: While standing upon that peak overlooking the terrain above the rim wall, we got the thrill of thrills, for there lay the glacier, shriveled and shrunken from its former size, almost senile, with its back against the mountain walls to the east of it, putting up its last fight for life. It was still what seemed to be a lusty giant, but it was dying, dying, dying, every score of years and as it receded, it was spewing at its mouth the accumulations buried within its bosom for centuries. Today, you can visit Sperry Glacier and walk along the same route that Sperry and his party traveled 120 years ago, although the glacier looks very different today. Join us on this visual tour of the glacier’s past and present. We hope that concerted action on greenhouse gas emissions will assure that this beautiful glacier has a future.                       Spread the...

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Glacier Loss Threatens Stoneflies in Glacier National Park

Posted by on Dec 13, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, News, Science | 0 comments

Glacier Loss Threatens Stoneflies in Glacier National Park

Spread the News:ShareGlaciers in the Rocky Mountains are undergoing rapid retreat, threatening two remarkable insect species that live in streams fed by glacial meltwater. Lednia tumana (meltwater stonefly) and Zapada glacier (Western glacier stonefly) have recently been proposed for listing under the Endangered Species Act due to the threat that climate change poses to their habitats. A recent study by J. Joseph Giersch et al. published in Global Change Biology offers insight into the factors that influence the distribution of these species, providing valuable information for conservation efforts. In an interview with GlacierHub, Giersch, a scientist at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), said, “Findings from our research were used by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to inform the listing decision for the two species.” The study took place in Glacier National Park, Montana, where regional warming has had serious effects. Surveys of glacial extent revealed that 80% of glacial mass within the park has been lost since the 19th century, with full recession predicted over the next two decades, according to Paul Carrara in the Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences. This creates the need for a better understanding of glacier-dependent species such as the stoneflies and ecological implications of species loss. The team of researchers led by Giersch sampled the alpine stream network within Glacier National Park between 1996 and 2015, tracking the abundance of nymph (the immature form and second stage of the life cycle) and adult Lednia tumana and Zapada glacier. Samples of Lednia tumana were found in a total of 113 streams within the park, while Zapada glacier was only detected in 10 streams, six within the park and four within other parts of the Rocky Mountains in Montana and Wyoming. Both species of stonefly are endemic to the region around Glacier National Park and are range-restricted. Their distributions were found to be related to cold stream temperatures and proximity to glaciers or permanent snowfields, with survival “dependent on the unique thermal and hydrologic conditions found only in glacier-fed and snowmelt-driven alpine streams,” according to the study. An interesting feature of both Lednia tumana and Zapada glacier is that they are aquatic in the egg and nymph stages of their life cycles, before becoming terrestrial adults. The adult females lay eggs in short sections of cold alpine streams found directly below glaciers and permanent snowfields within the park. The whole life cycle can last from one to two years. When the stonefly’s eggs hatch, the nymphs swim or drift along the alpine streams, feeding and growing until they emerge as fully grown adults in July or August. The short-lived adults are weak fliers, so they tend to be found on streamside vegetation. Male and female adult Zapada glacier communicate and find each other by drumming (tapping specialized structures in their abdominal segments on the material at the bottom of the stream). After finding each other, they mate and the females lay eggs in the streams, re-starting the life cycle process. Mature Lednia tumana nymphs tend to be about a quarter of an inch-long, while adults are slightly smaller, according to the USFWS. As alpine glaciers in Glacier National Park disappear as a result of climate change, meltwater contributions to alpine streams will decrease, changing the temperature and hydrological regimes that both stonefly species, particularly in the egg and nymph stages, depend on. “The loss of permanent cold water to their native habitat may eventually result in the extinction of these species. Additionally, a shorter-term effect could be a decrease in population connectivity due to cold water dependent species migrating upstream in response to warming temperatures,”...

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Roundup: GLOFs, Presidential Warnings, and Glacial Lakes

Posted by on Aug 22, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: GLOFs, Presidential Warnings, and Glacial Lakes

Spread the News:ShareObama: Climate Change ‘Could Mean No More Glaciers In Glacier National Park,’ Statue of Liberty From Breitbart:  “During Saturday’s Weekly Address, President Obama stated, “the threat of climate change means that protecting our public lands and waters is more important than ever. Rising temperatures could mean no more glaciers in Glacier National Park. No more Joshua Trees in Joshua Tree National Park. Rising seas could destroy vital ecosystems in the Everglades, even threaten Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty.” To read the full transcript of the President’s Weekly Address, click here.   Melting Glaciers Pose Threat Beyond Water Scarcity: Floods From VOA News:   “The tropical glaciers of South America are dying from soot and rising temperatures, threatening water supplies to communities that have depended on them for centuries. But experts say that the slow process measured in inches of glacial retreat per year also can lead to a sudden, dramatic tragedy. The melting of glaciers like Peru’s Pastoruri has put cities like Huaraz, located downslope from the glacier about 35 miles (55 kilometers) away, at risk from what scientists call a ‘GLOF’ — Glacial Lake Outburst Flood.” Click here to read more about the risk of glacial lake outburst floods from GlacierHub’s founder and editor, Ben Orlove.   Yukon has a new lake, thanks to a retreating glacier From CBC News:  “Yukon has lost a river, and now gained a lake, thanks to the retreating Kaskawulsh glacier. Geologists and hikers first noticed earlier this summer that the Slims River, which for centuries had delivered melt water from the glacier to Kluane Lake, had disappeared — the glacial run-off was now being sent in a different direction. Now, the level of Kluane Lake has dropped enough to turn the remote Cultus Bay, on the east side of the lake, into Cultus Lake. A narrow channel of water that once connected the bay to the larger lake is gone, exposing a wide gravel bar between the two.” To read more, click here. Spread the...

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Roundup: Glaciers are Visited by Tourists, Scientists and Microbes

Posted by on Mar 28, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, News, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: Glaciers are Visited by Tourists, Scientists and Microbes

Spread the News:ShareEach week, we highlight three stories from the forefront of glacier news. Glacier National Park prepares for busier season this year From KPAS: “Glacier National Park continue to celebrate their 100th year anniversary and anticipates a very busy upcoming summer season and even launched a new program. “Last year we saw a 3%-4% increase in visitation. It was our highest visitation on record; 2.3 million people we welcomed here at Glacier National Park. This year we anticipate an even higher visitation,” park spokeswoman Margie Steigerwald said. This marks the first year for Every Kid in a Park, a program launched by the National Park Foundation. Steigerwald says its purpose is to introduce more kids and their families to the national park system.” Read more about this anniversary here. Scientists fly glacial ice to south pole to unlock secrets of global warming From  The Guardian: “In a few weeks, researchers will begin work on a remarkable scientific project. They will drill deep into the Col du Dôme glacier on Mont Blanc and remove a 130 metre core of ice. Then they will fly it, in sections, by helicopter to a laboratory in Grenoble before shipping it to Antarctica. There the ice core will be placed in a specially constructed vault at the French-Italian Concordia research base, 1,000 miles from the South Pole. The Col du Dôme ice will become the first of several dozen other cores, extracted from glaciers around the world, that will be added to the repository over the next few years. The idea of importing ice to the south pole may seem odd – the polar equivalent of taking coals to Newcastle – but the project has a very serious aim, researchers insist.” Read more about this ice core repository here. Microbes and toxins frozen within glaciers could reveal the future of human life on Earth—or threaten it From Phys.org: “Arthur Conan Doyle’s famous literary detective Sherlock Holmes once noted that “the little things are infinitely the most important.” It’s a belief that investigators at the University of Alberta obviously share. Whether they’re seeking to understand the tiniest forms of life, taking small steps toward major breakthroughs or influencing students in subtle but profound ways, U of A researchers and educators are proving that little things can make a big impact. If aliens came to Earth on a fact-finding mission after the extinction of the human species, they could do worse than head straight for what’s left of the planet’s glaciers. Frozen in the ice is a wealth of information not only on our past climate over hundreds of thousands of years, but also on the toxins we spew into the atmosphere, even the diseases and plagues to which we succumb.” Learn more about these organisms and toxins here. Spread the...

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