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  • When Rivers Meet the Sea: Carbon Cycling in the Gulf of Alaska

    When rivers meet the sea, the sediment they carry becomes mixed into the ocean, where it makes quite a splash, biogeochemically speaking. In the subarctic North Pacific Ocean, for example, iron-rich sediment delivered from the continental margin spurs a wintertime phytoplankton bloom over 900 kilometers offshore. The presence of these terrigenous particles is felt up…

  • Roundup: Crack, Flood, Fight

    Petermann Crack Develops From Grist: “Petermann is one of the largest and most important glaciers in the world, with a direct connection to the core of the Greenland ice sheet. That means that even though this week’s new iceberg at Petermann is just 1/500th the size of the massive one that broke off the Larsen C…

  • Hunt for Lost Plots in Glacier Bay Yields Key Data

    20th century ecologist William Skinner Cooper has a long legacy. He spurred the establishment of Glacier Bay National Park and was one of the first American scientists to use the technique of aerial photography. His name lives on through Alaska’s Mt. Cooper and the biggest award offered by the Ecological Society of America. That legacy…

  • Life on the Rocks: Climate Change and Antarctic Biodiversity

    By now, it’s a familiar story: climate change is melting glaciers in Antarctica, revealing an increasing proportion of ice-free terrain. The consequences of this melt are manifold, and one may be surprising: as more ground is bared, Antarctic biodiversity is expected to increase. Currently, most of the terrestrial biodiversity— microbes, invertebrates, and plants like grasses…

  • Roundup: Seals, Flood Mitigation, and Freezing Levels

    Seal Whiskers Detect Ecosystem Change From Polar Biology: “Warm Atlantic water in west Spitsbergen have led to an influx of more fish species. The most abundant marine mammal species in these fjords is the ringed seal. In this study, we used isotopic data from whiskers of two cohorts of adult ringed seals to determine whether…

  • Shining on a Glacier: Girls on Ice

    One day last June, something rare took place on Interior Alaska’s Gulkana Glacier— a dance party. As a treat for the final day of Girls on Ice, a glacier-based science education program for teenage girls, instructors lowered each of the nine girls into a crevasse, two at a time, and they used ice axes and…

  • Call for Papers: Special Journal Issue on Mountain Cryosphere

    CALL FOR PAPERS: SPECIAL ISSUE ON “IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON THE HIGH-MOUNTAIN CRYOSPHERE AND ASSOCIATED RESPONSES” The special issue, with guest co-editors Carolina Adler (MRI), Christian Huggel (University of Zurich), Anne Nolin (Oregon State University) and Ben Orlove (Columbia University), will be published in the journal Regional Environmental Change (REC), focusing on the impacts of climate change…

  • Roundup: Greenland Earthquake, Mural Restoration, and Phytoplankton

    Greenland Earthquake Triggers Landslide-Induced Tsunami From Temblor: “Over the weekend, a M=4.1 earthquake on Greenland’s western coast caused a massive landslide, triggering a tsunami that inundated small settlements on the coast. At this stage, four people are feared to have died, nine others were injured, and 11 buildings were destroyed. Glacial earthquakes are a relatively new…

  • Water Stress in the Naryn River Basin

    Around the world, meltwater from snow and glaciers has provided surrounding communities with water for irrigation and hydropower, but climate change is altering the timing and volume of the annual water flow cycle. This issue is pressing in eastern Kyrgyzstan, where the glaciers and snowpack of the Tien Shan Mountains form the headwaters of the Naryn River, which flows…

  • Putting Your Best Tusk Forward: Narwhals and Climate Research

    In 1576, Queen Elizabeth I paid the equivalent of half a million dollars for a unicorn horn, which she believed could neutralize poison. Of course, it wasn’t a unicorn horn at all, but a narwhal tusk, remarkable in its own right. Today, over 440 years later, narwhals continue to surprise and attract attention. A recent…