Roundup

Roundup: A Shrinking Lake, a Deepening Lake, and Ice below Sea Level

Posted by on Jun 19, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, News, Roundup, Science | 0 comments

Roundup: A Shrinking Lake, a Deepening Lake, and Ice below Sea Level

Spread the News:ShareGlacial Retreat Shrinks Yukon’s Largest Lake From CBC News: “Kluane MLA Wade Istchenko says receding water levels on Kluane Lake are posing a problem for his constituents — and he wants the government to respond. The lake level first dropped last year, after the Kaskawulsh Glacier retreated so much that its meltwater abruptly switched direction, away from Kluane Lake. Researchers have blamed climate change for the geologic phenomenon referred to as ‘river piracy’.” You can read more about how Istchenko proposes the legislature respond here.   Spillway Lake in Nepal Deepens From Water: “Since the 1950s, many debris-covered glaciers in the Nepalese Himalaya have developed large terminal moraine-dammed supraglacial lakes, which grow through expansion and deepening on the surface of a glacier. As temperatures continue to rise and lakes continue to grow in area and volume, they pose a flooding risk to the Sherpa villages down-valley.” Learn more about how the Ngozumpa Glacier’s terminal lake is growing here.   Melting an Ice Sheet from Below From Nature: “Because the East Antarctic Ice Sheet seems so cold and isolated, researchers thought that it had been stable in the past and was unlikely to change in the future — a stark contrast to the much smaller West Antarctic Ice Sheet, which has raised alarms because many of its glaciers are rapidly retreating. In the past few years, however, “almost everything we thought we knew about East Antarctica has turned out to be wrong”, says Tas van Ommen, a glaciologist at the Australian Antarctic Division in Kingston, near Hobart. By flying across the continent on planes with instruments that probe beneath the ice, his team found that a large fraction of East Antarctica is well below sea level, which makes it more vulnerable to the warming ocean than previously thought. The researchers also uncovered clues that the massive Totten glacier, which holds about as much ice as West Antarctica, has repeatedly shrunk and grown in the past — another sign that it could retreat in the future.” Read more about uncertainty in the East Antarctic here.     Spread the...

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Roundup: Avalanches, Droughts, and a Sherpa protest

Posted by on Jun 5, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, News, Roundup, Science | 0 comments

Roundup: Avalanches, Droughts, and a Sherpa protest

Spread the News:ShareRoundup: Avalanches, Droughts, and Sherpas   Calving Event in Peruvian Lake Damages Infrastructure Designed to Reduce Flood Risk From El Comercio: “Small ice avalanches have damaged the system of syphons in Lake Palcacocha, Ancash, Peru. Marco Zapata, the head of the Glacier Research Unit at INAIGEM, stated that on May 31, around 8 p.m., a calving event occurred at the glacier front on Mount Pucaranra, releasing ice into the lake. This event generated waves 3 meters in height, which caused 10 of the syphons to shift and which destroyed three gauges and a water level sensor.” Find out more about Lake Palcacocha and ice avalanches here.   Asian Glaciers Fight Against Drought From Nature: “The high mountains of Asia… have the highest concentration of glaciers globally, and 800 million people depend in part on meltwater from them. Water stress makes this region vulnerable economically and socially to drought, but glaciers are a uniquely drought-resilient source of water. Glaciers provide summer meltwater to rivers and aquifers that is sufficient for the basic needs of 136 million people… Predicted glacier loss would add considerably to drought-related water stress. Such additional water stress increases the risk of social instability, conflict and sudden, uncontrolled population migrations triggered by water scarcity, which is already associated with the large and rapidly growing populations and hydro-economies of these basins.” Find out more about Asia’s drought-resilient glaciers here.   Sherpas Demand Summit Certificates at Protest From The Himalayan Times: “Hundreds of sherpa climbers who met at Mt Everest base camp [in May] asked the government to immediately issue their summit certificates… Sherpa climbers who made it to the top of several peaks, including Mt Everest, have not been getting their summit certificates since last year after the government refused to approve their ascents citing a clause of the Mountaineering Expedition Regulation that bars them from obtaining such certificates… For most of the foreign climbers, summiting a mountain without sherpas’ help is almost impossible in Nepal… The new amendment to the regulation will recognize high-altitude workers as a part of the expedition to get certificates.” Find out more about the Sherpa protest and resolution here.     Spread the...

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Roundup: Glacier Lakes, Narwhals, and Water Stress

Posted by on May 29, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: Glacier Lakes, Narwhals, and Water Stress

Spread the News:ShareGlacier Lake Deepening in the Himalayas From Water: “This paper investigates physical processes in the four sub-basins of Ngozumpa glacier’s terminal Spillway Lake for the period 2012–2014 in order to characterize lake deepening and mass transfer processes. Quantifying the growth and deepening of this terminal lake is important given its close vicinity to Sherpa villages down-valley… In areas of rapid deepening, where low mean bottom temperatures prevail, thin debris cover or bare ice is present. This finding is consistent with previously reported localized regions of lake deepening and is useful in predicting future deepening.” You can read more about glacier lake deepening here.   Narwhals To Help Monitor Melting Glaciers From New Scientist: “An iconic whale species will soon be aiding climate change research. Narwhals are spending more time near melting sea ice and researchers hope to exploit this new behavior by tagging the mammals with temperature sensors to help us accurately monitor underwater sea ice melt for the first time.” You can read more about narwhals–marine mammals, once confused with unicorns–and glacier monitoring here.   A Study of Water Stress in Kyrgyzstan From Water: “Water vulnerabilities in Central Asia are affected by a complex combination of climate-sensitive water sources, trans-boundary political tensions, infrastructure deficiencies and a lack of water management organization from community to federal levels. This study aims to clarify the drivers of water stress across the 440 km Naryn River basin, headwater stem to the Syr Darya and the disappearing North Aral Sea… Surveys indicate that current water stress is primarily a function of water management and access issues resulting from the clunky transition from Soviet era large-scale agriculture to post-Soviet small-plot farming. Snow and ice meltwaters play a dominant role in the surface and ground water supplies to downstream communities across the study’s 4220 m elevation gradient, so future increases to water stress due to changes in volume and timing of water supply is likely given frozen waters’ high sensitivities to warming temperatures. The combined influence of social, political and climate-induced pressures on water supplies in the Naryn basin suggest the need for proactive planning and adaptation strategies, and warrant concern for similar melt-sourced Central Asian watersheds.” You can read about this challenging situation here. Spread the...

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Roundup: Hazard Films, Water Scarcity, and Peace Building

Posted by on May 22, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: Hazard Films, Water Scarcity, and Peace Building

Spread the News:Share Roundup: Films, Water and Peace   Films Raise Awareness in Volcanic Regions From Science Direct: “The medium of film is well established for education and communication about hazardous phenomena as it provides engaging ways to directly view hazards and their impacts… Using volcanic eruptions as a focus, an evidence-based methodology was devised to create, use, and track the outcomes of digital film tools designed to raise hazard and risk awareness, and develop preparedness efforts. Experiences from two contrasting eruptions were documented, with the secondary purpose of fostering social and cultural memories of eruptions, developed in response to demand from at-risk communities during field-based research. The films were created as a partnership with local volcano monitoring scientists and at-risk populations who, consequently, became the leading focus of the films, thus offering a substantial contrast to other types of hazard communication.” Read more about it here.   An Overview of Water Issues in Mountain Asia From Cambridge Core: “Asia, a region grappling with the impacts of climate change, increasing natural disasters, and transboundary water issues, faces major challenges to water security. Water resources there are closely tied to the dramatic Hindu-Kush Himalayan (HKH) mountain range, where over 46,000 glaciers hold some of the largest repositories of fresh water on earth. Often described as the water tower of Asia, the HKH harbors the snow and ice that form the headwaters of the continent’s major rivers. Downstream, this network of river systems sustains more than 1.3 billion people who depend on these freshwater sources for their consumption and agricultural production, and increasingly as a source of hydropower.” Learn more about the HKH area here.   The Pathway of Peaceful Living From Te Kaharoa: “This paper traces the peacebuilding efforts of Anne Te Maihāora Dodds (Waitaha) in her North Otago community over the last twenty-five years. The purpose of this paper is to record these unique localized efforts, as a historical record of grass-roots initiatives aimed at creating a greater awareness of indigenous and environmental issues… The paper discussed several rituals and pilgrimages. It describes the retracing of ancestral footsteps of Te Heke Ōmaramataka (2012), the peace walk at Maungatī (2012) and the Ocean to Alps Celebration (1990). This paper also discusses the genesis behind cultural events such.” Explore more about the Maori nation here.   Spread the...

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Roundup: Kyrgyz-Style Wakeboarding and Antarctica

Posted by on May 15, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: Kyrgyz-Style Wakeboarding and Antarctica

Spread the News:ShareRoundup: Kyrgyz Wakeboarding and Antarctica Extreme Sports, Kyrgyz-Style From RadioFreeEurope: “Almaz Smailkulov, a Kyrgyz athlete, has taken wakeboarding to a new level, creating his own version of the sport.” You can view the video here.   East Antarctica’s Totten Ice Shelf is Warming From Nature: “On a glorious January morning in 2015, the Australian icebreaker RSV Aurora Australis was losing a battle off the coast of East Antarctica. For days, the ship had been trying to push through heavy sea ice… Then the weather came to the rescue, with a wind change that blew the ice away from the shore, opening a path through the pack… Rintoul and his team were the first scientists to reach the Totten Ice Shelf — a vast floating ice ledge that fronts the largest glacier in East Antarctica… The team had to work fast before the ice closed again and blocked any escape. For more than 12 hours, Rintoul and his colleagues carried on non-stop, probing the temperature and salinity of the water, the speed and direction of ocean currents as well as the shape and depth of the ocean floor… These first direct observations confirmed a fear that researchers had long harboured… East Antarctica is well below sea level, which makes it more vulnerable to the warming ocean than previously thought.” Read more about the findings here.   Benthic Colonization in the Antarctic Peninsula From Ecography: “The Antarctic Peninsula is among the places on Earth that registered major warming in the last 60 years… The loss of sea-bed ice coverage, on the one hand has been affecting benthic assemblages, but on the other it is opening up new areas for benthic colonization. Potter Cove (South Shetland Islands) offered the opportunity of assessing both processes. We recently reported a sudden shift of benthic assemblages related to increased sedimentation rates caused by glacier retreat. This glacier retreat also uncovered a new island that presents a natural experiment to study Antarctic benthic colonization and succession… Under the current scenario of climate change, these results acquire high relevance as they suggest a two-fold effect of the Antarctic Peninsula warming: the environmental shifts that threaten coastal ecosystems, and also the opening up of new areas for colonization that may occur at a previously unimagined speed. Learn more about benthic conolization here. Spread the...

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Roundup: Kayaks, Snow Machines and Drones

Posted by on May 8, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: Kayaks, Snow Machines and Drones

Spread the News:ShareRoundup: Kayaks, Regrowing Glaciers, and the Bowdoin   Research Using Remote-Controlled Kayaks From Alaska Public Media: “LeConte Glacier near Petersburg… [is] the southern-most tide water glacier in the northern hemisphere and scientists have been studying it to give them a better idea of glacial retreat and sea level rise around the world… to get close to the glacier, which is constantly calving, a team of scientists is relying on unmanned, remote controlled kayaks… these kayaks have been completely tweaked by Marion and an ocean robotics team from Oregon State University… The boats are customized with a keel, antennas, lights and boxes of computer chips and wires.” Find out more about the kayaks and research here.   Regrowing Morteratsch Glacier with Artificial Snow From New Scientist: “The idea is to create artificial snow and blow it over the Morteratsch glacier in Switzerland each summer, hoping it will protect the ice and eventually cause the glacier to regrow… The locals had been inspired by stories that white fleece coverings on a smaller glacier called Diavolezzafirn had helped it to grow by up to 8 metres in 10 years… Oerlemans says it would take 4000 snow machines to do the job, producing snow by mixing air blasts with water, which cools down through expansion to create ice crystals. The hope is that the water can be “recycled” from small lakes of meltwater alongside the glacier… But the costs… are immense.” Find out more about how this works here.   Drones Capture a Major Calving Event From The Cryosphere: “A high-resolution displacement field is inferred from UAV orthoimages (geometrically corrected for uniform scale) taken immediately before and after the initiation of a large fracture, which induced a major calving event… Modelling results reveal (i) that the crack was more than half-thickness deep, filled with water and getting irreversibly deeper when it was captured by the UAV and (ii) that the crack initiated in an area of high horizontal shear caused by a local basal bump immediately behind the current calving front… Our study demonstrates that the combination of UAV photogrammetry and ice flow modelling is a promising tool to horizontally and vertically track the propagation of fractures responsible for large calving events.” Find out more about the study here. Spread the...

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