Roundup

Roundup: Seals, Flood Mitigation, and Freezing Levels

Posted by on Jul 17, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Roundup, Science | 0 comments

Roundup: Seals, Flood Mitigation, and Freezing Levels

Spread the News:ShareSeal Whiskers Detect Ecosystem Change From Polar Biology: “Warm Atlantic water in west Spitsbergen have led to an influx of more fish species. The most abundant marine mammal species in these fjords is the ringed seal. In this study, we used isotopic data from whiskers of two cohorts of adult ringed seals to determine whether signals of ecosystem changes were detectable in this top marine predator.” Find out more about ringed seals here.   Flood Mitigation Strategies in Pakistan From Natural Hazards: “The frequency and severity of flood events have been increased and have affected the livelihood and well-being of millions of people in Pakistan. Effective mitigation policies require an understanding of the impacts and local responses to extreme events, which is limited in Pakistan. This study revealed the adaptation measures adopted in Pakistan, and that the local policies on disaster management need to be improved to address the barriers to the adoption of advanced level adaptation measures.” Find out more about flood risk mitigation in Pakistan here.   Rising Freezing Levels in Tropical Andes From AGU Publications: “The mass balance of tropical glaciers in Peru is highly sensitive to a rise in the freezing level height (FLH). Knowledge of future changes in the FLH is crucial to estimating changes in glacier extents. Glaciers may continue shrinking considerably, and the consequences of vanishing glaciers are especially severe where people have only limited capacity to adapt to changes in the water availability due to, for instance, lack of financial resources.” Find out more about freezing levels in Peru here.   Spread the...

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Roundup: A Mountainous Geopolitical Stage 

Posted by on Jul 10, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, News, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: A Mountainous Geopolitical Stage 

Spread the News:ShareControversial World Heritage Site Proclaimed From the Japan Times: “A handful of pro-Tibet activists protested earlier this week while the International Campaign for Tibet (ICT) advocacy group warned that giving Hoh Xil heritage status could have consequences for Tibet.” Read more about the controversy around one of the newest UNESCO World Heritage Sites here.   Indian Pilgrims Stalled in the Mountains From The Economic Times: “China accused Indian troops of ‘crossing the boundary’ in the Sikkim sector and put their immediate withdrawal as condition to reopen the Nathu La Pass for Indian pilgrims traveling to Kailash Mansarovar.” Read more about the impasse here.   Himalayan Border Dispute From the Hindustan Times: “China on Friday accused India of ‘ulterior motives’ in claiming the entire Doklam or Donglang region as part of the tri-junction with Bhutan, saying New Delhi’s stance went against its acceptance of a British-era convention on national boundaries in the area.” Read more about the Sikkim standoff here.   Spread the...

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Roundup: Greenland Earthquake, Mural Restoration, and Phytoplankton

Posted by on Jun 26, 2017 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Featured Posts, Roundup, Science | 0 comments

Roundup: Greenland Earthquake, Mural Restoration, and Phytoplankton

Spread the News:ShareGreenland Earthquake Triggers Landslide-Induced Tsunami From Temblor: “Over the weekend, a M=4.1 earthquake on Greenland’s western coast caused a massive landslide, triggering a tsunami that inundated small settlements on the coast. At this stage, four people are feared to have died, nine others were injured, and 11 buildings were destroyed. Glacial earthquakes are a relatively new class of seismic event, and are often linked to the calving of large outlet glaciers.” You can read more about the glacial earthquake in Greenland here. Mural Restoration at Glacier National Park From Hockaday Museum of Art: “Early visitors to Glacier Park Lodge were treated to architectural and visual grandeur inside the building that was almost as expansive as the surrounding landscape. The scenic panels covered hundreds of square feet and appeared in a 1939 Glacier Park Lodge inventory as ’51 watercolor panels.’ In September of 2012, Leanne Brown donated the murals to the Hockaday in memory of her grandparents, Leona and Robert Brown, who had saved and restored 15 of the murals.” Learn more about the restored murals here. Phytoplankton Growth in Alaska From AGU Publications: “Primary productivity in the Gulf of Alaska is limited by availability of the micronutrient iron (Fe). Identifying and quantifying the Fe sources to this region are therefore of fundamental ecological importance. Understanding the fundamental processes driving nutrient fluxes to surface waters in this region is made even more important by the fact that climate and global change are impacting many key processes, which could perturb the marine ecosystem in ways we do not understand.” Read more about phytoplankton growth in the Gulf of Alaska here.   Spread the...

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Roundup: A Shrinking Lake, a Deepening Lake, and Ice below Sea Level

Posted by on Jun 19, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, News, Roundup, Science | 0 comments

Roundup: A Shrinking Lake, a Deepening Lake, and Ice below Sea Level

Spread the News:ShareGlacial Retreat Shrinks Yukon’s Largest Lake From CBC News: “Kluane MLA Wade Istchenko says receding water levels on Kluane Lake are posing a problem for his constituents — and he wants the government to respond. The lake level first dropped last year, after the Kaskawulsh Glacier retreated so much that its meltwater abruptly switched direction, away from Kluane Lake. Researchers have blamed climate change for the geologic phenomenon referred to as ‘river piracy’.” You can read more about how Istchenko proposes the legislature respond here.   Spillway Lake in Nepal Deepens From Water: “Since the 1950s, many debris-covered glaciers in the Nepalese Himalaya have developed large terminal moraine-dammed supraglacial lakes, which grow through expansion and deepening on the surface of a glacier. As temperatures continue to rise and lakes continue to grow in area and volume, they pose a flooding risk to the Sherpa villages down-valley.” Learn more about how the Ngozumpa Glacier’s terminal lake is growing here.   Melting an Ice Sheet from Below From Nature: “Because the East Antarctic Ice Sheet seems so cold and isolated, researchers thought that it had been stable in the past and was unlikely to change in the future — a stark contrast to the much smaller West Antarctic Ice Sheet, which has raised alarms because many of its glaciers are rapidly retreating. In the past few years, however, “almost everything we thought we knew about East Antarctica has turned out to be wrong”, says Tas van Ommen, a glaciologist at the Australian Antarctic Division in Kingston, near Hobart. By flying across the continent on planes with instruments that probe beneath the ice, his team found that a large fraction of East Antarctica is well below sea level, which makes it more vulnerable to the warming ocean than previously thought. The researchers also uncovered clues that the massive Totten glacier, which holds about as much ice as West Antarctica, has repeatedly shrunk and grown in the past — another sign that it could retreat in the future.” Read more about uncertainty in the East Antarctic here.     Spread the...

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Roundup: Avalanches, Droughts, and a Sherpa protest

Posted by on Jun 5, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, News, Roundup, Science | 0 comments

Roundup: Avalanches, Droughts, and a Sherpa protest

Spread the News:ShareRoundup: Avalanches, Droughts, and Sherpas   Calving Event in Peruvian Lake Damages Infrastructure Designed to Reduce Flood Risk From El Comercio: “Small ice avalanches have damaged the system of syphons in Lake Palcacocha, Ancash, Peru. Marco Zapata, the head of the Glacier Research Unit at INAIGEM, stated that on May 31, around 8 p.m., a calving event occurred at the glacier front on Mount Pucaranra, releasing ice into the lake. This event generated waves 3 meters in height, which caused 10 of the syphons to shift and which destroyed three gauges and a water level sensor.” Find out more about Lake Palcacocha and ice avalanches here.   Asian Glaciers Fight Against Drought From Nature: “The high mountains of Asia… have the highest concentration of glaciers globally, and 800 million people depend in part on meltwater from them. Water stress makes this region vulnerable economically and socially to drought, but glaciers are a uniquely drought-resilient source of water. Glaciers provide summer meltwater to rivers and aquifers that is sufficient for the basic needs of 136 million people… Predicted glacier loss would add considerably to drought-related water stress. Such additional water stress increases the risk of social instability, conflict and sudden, uncontrolled population migrations triggered by water scarcity, which is already associated with the large and rapidly growing populations and hydro-economies of these basins.” Find out more about Asia’s drought-resilient glaciers here.   Sherpas Demand Summit Certificates at Protest From The Himalayan Times: “Hundreds of sherpa climbers who met at Mt Everest base camp [in May] asked the government to immediately issue their summit certificates… Sherpa climbers who made it to the top of several peaks, including Mt Everest, have not been getting their summit certificates since last year after the government refused to approve their ascents citing a clause of the Mountaineering Expedition Regulation that bars them from obtaining such certificates… For most of the foreign climbers, summiting a mountain without sherpas’ help is almost impossible in Nepal… The new amendment to the regulation will recognize high-altitude workers as a part of the expedition to get certificates.” Find out more about the Sherpa protest and resolution here.     Spread the...

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Roundup: Glacier Lakes, Narwhals, and Water Stress

Posted by on May 29, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: Glacier Lakes, Narwhals, and Water Stress

Spread the News:ShareGlacier Lake Deepening in the Himalayas From Water: “This paper investigates physical processes in the four sub-basins of Ngozumpa glacier’s terminal Spillway Lake for the period 2012–2014 in order to characterize lake deepening and mass transfer processes. Quantifying the growth and deepening of this terminal lake is important given its close vicinity to Sherpa villages down-valley… In areas of rapid deepening, where low mean bottom temperatures prevail, thin debris cover or bare ice is present. This finding is consistent with previously reported localized regions of lake deepening and is useful in predicting future deepening.” You can read more about glacier lake deepening here.   Narwhals To Help Monitor Melting Glaciers From New Scientist: “An iconic whale species will soon be aiding climate change research. Narwhals are spending more time near melting sea ice and researchers hope to exploit this new behavior by tagging the mammals with temperature sensors to help us accurately monitor underwater sea ice melt for the first time.” You can read more about narwhals–marine mammals, once confused with unicorns–and glacier monitoring here.   A Study of Water Stress in Kyrgyzstan From Water: “Water vulnerabilities in Central Asia are affected by a complex combination of climate-sensitive water sources, trans-boundary political tensions, infrastructure deficiencies and a lack of water management organization from community to federal levels. This study aims to clarify the drivers of water stress across the 440 km Naryn River basin, headwater stem to the Syr Darya and the disappearing North Aral Sea… Surveys indicate that current water stress is primarily a function of water management and access issues resulting from the clunky transition from Soviet era large-scale agriculture to post-Soviet small-plot farming. Snow and ice meltwaters play a dominant role in the surface and ground water supplies to downstream communities across the study’s 4220 m elevation gradient, so future increases to water stress due to changes in volume and timing of water supply is likely given frozen waters’ high sensitivities to warming temperatures. The combined influence of social, political and climate-induced pressures on water supplies in the Naryn basin suggest the need for proactive planning and adaptation strategies, and warrant concern for similar melt-sourced Central Asian watersheds.” You can read about this challenging situation here. Spread the...

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