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  • Photo Friday: Lake Issyk Kul

    Located high in Central Asia’s Tian Shan Mountains, Issyk Kul is one of the world’s largest alpine lakes. Though Issyk Kul literally means “warm lake” in the Kyrgyz language, the crystalline waters vary in surface temperature from as high as 73 degrees Fahrenheit in July to as low as 36 degrees Fahrenheit in January. Still, warmth is relative, and…

  • Arctic Field Science: An Unruly Harmony

    It’s 9 p.m. on my 26th birthday, and I’m standing outside a trailer in the middle of the Alaskan tundra. The trailer is my workplace for the summer, and my labmates and I are waving signs— mine reads “You are Alaska”— and cheering for the runners sprinting past us, in the final meters of an…

  • IPCC Announces Details of a Report Chapter on High Mountains

    On 17 August, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) announced the list of experts it has invited to work on a major document, the Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (SROCC). Hans Poertner, the co-chair of IPCC Working Group II, underscored the importance of this report. In a statement issued…

  • National Climate Assessment Report Under Review by Trump Administration

    The Trump administration reviews a 545-page draft report about the causes and impacts of global warming including the imminent threat of glacial retreat, which is part of the National Climate Assessment.

  • Roundup: Climate Change and Poetic Geology

    Trump Administration Disbands Climate Advisory Committee From Nature: “The advisory group’s charter expired on 20 August, and Trump administration officials informed members late last week that it would not be renewed. ‘It really makes me worried and deeply sad,’ says Richard Moss, a climate scientist at the University of Maryland in College Park and co-chair…

  • Photo Friday: Air Bubbles in Glacial Ice

    Glacial ice can range in age from several hundred to several thousands of years old. In order to study long-term climate records, scientists drill and extract ice cores from glaciers and ice sheets. The ice cores contain information about past climate, giving scientists the ability to learn about the evolution of ice and past climates. Trapped air bubbles contain…

  • The Restlessness of Cotopaxi: A “Benevolent” Eruption

    On August 14, 2015, Ecuador’s glacier-capped Cotopaxi erupted for the first time since the 1940s. A billowing plume of ash rose early in the morning and grew through the day, reaching heights of over three miles. Two small eruptions rained ash on the southern outskirts of Quito, Ecuador’s capital 45 kilometers from the volcano. These…

  • Glacial Change in China’s Central Asia

    Though I lived in China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region for almost two years, it was only when I was in the heart of the Tian Shan mountains, my motorcycle meandering its way around fallen rock, sheep herds and horses, that I felt truly at home. Just a few hours outside of the city of Shihezi,…

  • The Pascua-Lama Mining Project Threatens Glaciers

    Fabiana Li, an associate professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Manitoba, brings new insight to a long-standing conflict over a South American mining project in her recently published article “Moving Glaciers: Remaking Nature and Mineral Extraction” on Sage Journals. Li’s article investigates the controversial Pascua-Lama mining project, located on the border…

  • Roundup: Ultra Denials, Temperatures, and Marathons

    Trump on Climate: Deny, Deny, Deny From HuffPost: “Perry went on to defend his and others’ denial of near-universally accepted climate science, suggesting that those who question the scientific community’s findings are more intelligent. Also in June, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said glaciers in Montana’s Glacier National Park started melting ‘right after the end of…