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Photo Friday: Air Bubbles in Glacial Ice

Posted by on Aug 18, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images, Science | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Air Bubbles in Glacial Ice

Spread the News:ShareGlacial ice can range in age from several hundred to several thousands of years old. In order to study long-term climate records, scientists drill and extract ice cores from glaciers and ice sheets. The ice cores contain information about past climate, giving scientists the ability to learn about the evolution of ice and past climates. Trapped air bubbles contain past atmospheric composition, information on temperature variations, and types of vegetation from earlier times. Studying ice bubbles is one way for scientists to know that there have been several Ice Ages, for example. Unfortunately, glaciers have been retreating at unprecedented rates since the early twentieth century, destroying ice bubbles. This Photo Friday, view images of these information-packed glacier ice bubbles. Spread the...

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Photo Friday: The Shrinking Patagonian Icefield

Posted by on Aug 11, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images, Science | 0 comments

Photo Friday: The Shrinking Patagonian Icefield

Spread the News:ShareTypically obscured by cloud cover and mist, it is difficult to study the glaciers of the Southern Patagonian Icefield from space. However, on April 29, May 1, and May 24, 2016, NASA satellites captured clear images of the glaciers. Compiled into striking mosaics, this data reveals a great deal about the shrinking icefield. For example, the mosaics obviate the differences between the eastern and western parts of the icefield. Heavy precipitation on the landscape west of the icefield keeps the terrain green and lush, while the eastern regions of retreat are characterized by bare, brown rock. Glacial flour, a fine sediment produced when ice grinds over of bedrock, colors the proglacial lakes a distinct turquoise. Enjoy observing the Patagonian Icefield through the images below.             Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Equatorial Glaciers of Puncak Jaya

Posted by on Aug 4, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Equatorial Glaciers of Puncak Jaya

Spread the News:ShareIn 1989, Indonesia’s highest peak, Puncak Jaya (16,564 ft), within the Sudirman Range of Papua New Guinea, boasted five glaciers along its slopes. Today, these rare equatorial glaciers of Asia are nearly gone. By 2009, both Meren and Southwall, two of Puncak Jaya’s glaciers, had disappeared completely, and the remaining three glaciers, Carstenz, East Northwall Firn, and West North Wall Firn glaciers, were well on their way to doing the same, according to NASA Earth Observatory. A group of scientists collecting cores on Puncak Jaya reported to NPR in 2010 that they had watched the glacier “drop 12 inches in just two weeks.” Tropical glaciers— 99 percent of which are found in the Andes of Bolivia, Columbia, Ecuador, and Peru— have retreated rapidly in the last century, many losing more than half of their ice mass. Puncak Jaya’s glaciers experience only slight equatorial mean temperature variation during the year (around 0.5°C), according to NASA. “Experts think rising air temperatures are the primary reason that the glaciers have lost so much ice so quickly,” the Earth Observatory reports, but it also notes that “changes in humidity levels, precipitation patterns, and cloudiness can also have an impact.” View images of the massive retreat of Puncak Jaya’s glaciers.                 Spread the...

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Mount Kilimanjaro: Photographs by Christian Pfeil

Posted by on Jul 28, 2017 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Featured Posts, Images | 0 comments

Mount Kilimanjaro: Photographs by Christian Pfeil

Spread the News:ShareChristian Pfeil is an independent film producer and director who works mainly in Berlin, Germany. After finishing his studies in photography, his passion for film grew. His background in digital filmmaking allows him to transport his viewers and share stories through captive images. When asked why he chose this specific region in Africa for his photographs, Pfeil told GlacierHub that he was shooting a spot for IFAW in Kenya, and since he “loves nature and the animals, especially in that particular area,” he went for some more safari trips, taking a couple of thousand shots with his still camera. Pfeil’s work has received awards from the New York Film Festival, the United Nations, Cannes Lions, and other venues. In 2012, Pfeil founded EPICMAN Production, a Berlin based film production company. During his trip, Pfeil also took stunning photographs of Mount Kilimanjaro, the highest mountain in Africa known for its breathtaking glaciers and ice fields. Pfeil’s favorite part of his travels was Ngorongoro Crater and the Serengeti, he told GlacierHub. “Seeing and experiencing these breathtaking animals in action” and “being part of this stunning landscape” impressed him like no other place he has been. Click here to see more photos from Christian Pfeil’s trip to Africa.               Spread the...

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Ice without Scale: Photographs by Angeles Peña

Posted by on Jul 21, 2017 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Featured Posts, Images | 0 comments

Ice without Scale: Photographs by Angeles Peña

Spread the News:ShareAngeles Peña grew up in the mountains of Argentine Patagonia, immersed in a landscape that she considers wild, hostile, and infinite– and changing. “The winters flee with speed and are gradually disappearing. The glaciers recede. Summers are hotter. The seasons seem to be less and less defined,” she reflected. Peña has spent the last three years traveling through what she calls the “beautiful, stunning, and wildly desolate territory” of Andean Patagonia, photographing glaciers. In her pictures, she seeks to present her subjects without a sense of scale, and capture the essential qualities of ice, cold, and water. Browse through the below slideshow of work from her series, “Aguas de montaña.” Angeles2 Aguas de montaña1 Angeles3 Aguas de montaña Angeles5 Angeles1 Angeles9 Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Yak Rugby

Posted by on Jul 14, 2017 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Communities, Featured Posts, Images | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Yak Rugby

Spread the News:ShareKnown to many as the “roof of the world,” the Pamir Mountains are home to quite a few superlatives. But nothing in the Pamirs elicits quite as deep a gasp as the pastime of a group of ethnic Tajiks living in China’s Taxkorgan Autonomous County, near China’s borders with Pakistan, Afghanistan and Tajikistan. Buzkashi, a popular game among many Central Asian communities, is a sport in which riders grapple on horseback over an inflated goat carcass. In attempting to wrest the goat away from other competitors, riders often fall into large scrums, contorting their bodies while trying to keep their horses upright. Many fall off their horses, and deaths are not uncommon. Buzkashi may in fact be the most dangerous game in the world. In Taxkorgan, a region dominated by curtains of clouds, rocks, glacier ice, and snow, it is played atop yaks one day each year.           Spread the...

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