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  • Photo Friday: Island Glaciers of the Canadian Arctic

    Outside of Greenland, a quarter of the Arctic’s ice lies in Canada, much of it covering the Queen Elizabeth Islands. A recent paper in Environmental Research Letters found that, during the decade between 2005 and 2015, surface melt from the ice caps and glaciers of the Queen Elizabeth Islands increased by a staggering 900 percent,…

  • Glacier Peaks as Symbols of Peace

    Glacier peaks stand high and visible above areas of dense human population. To many people, they appear calm and serene, and in this way offer a vision of peace. Today, on International Day of Peace, celebrate the glaciers with us, recognizing the place the environment holds in our shared humanity.              …

  • Photo Friday: Along the Karakoram

    Known to many as the “roof of the world,” the Pamir Mountains are spread over one of the world’s most glaciated regions, cutting across parts of Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Afghanistan and China. It is a region dominated by curtains of clouds, rocks, glacier ice, and snow, as well as pastoralists and their sheep. Muztagh Ata, which translates directly…

  • Climate Change Through a Camera Lens

    The impacts of climate change on glaciers and other landscapes are often hard to conceptualize, making it difficult for scientists to convey the urgency of these changes to the general public. This difficulty is being addressed by photographers like Danish artist Carston Egevang and American Diane Tuft, who are taking action through visual image to…

  • Photo Friday: A Journey to Lake Issyk-Kul

    Issyk-Kul is the world’s second largest salt lake and one of the world’s largest alpine lakes. The lake is commonly called “hot lake” because it never freezes, even though it is surrounded by mountains. The mountains encompass the lake and protect the Issyk Kul hollow from extreme cold or hot winds. The lake valley is a…

  • Photo Friday: Monitoring Chile’s Volcanoes

    Currently, three volcanoes in Chile are restless, according to the Servicio Nacional de Geología y Minería. A “class yellow” status for these glacier-covered peaks means elevated seismic activity and higher potential for eruption. The ice caps on these giants mean that an eruption could spur Jökulhlaups, glacial outburst floods that can be extremely dangerous, such as in…

  • Meet the Writers of GlacierHub, 2016/2017 Edition

    Here at Glacierhub we have a team of passionate writers and scientific explorers working hard to bring you original reporting on glaciers and the global impacts of climate change. With funding support from Columbia University’s Earth Institute and Center for Research on Environmental Decisions, our writers cover stories about communities living near glaciers and the challenges…

  • Photo Friday: Lake Issyk Kul

    Located high in Central Asia’s Tian Shan Mountains, Issyk Kul is one of the world’s largest alpine lakes. Though Issyk Kul literally means “warm lake” in the Kyrgyz language, the crystalline waters vary in surface temperature from as high as 73 degrees Fahrenheit in July to as low as 36 degrees Fahrenheit in January. Still, warmth is relative, and…

  • Photo Friday: Air Bubbles in Glacial Ice

    Glacial ice can range in age from several hundred to several thousands of years old. In order to study long-term climate records, scientists drill and extract ice cores from glaciers and ice sheets. The ice cores contain information about past climate, giving scientists the ability to learn about the evolution of ice and past climates. Trapped air bubbles contain…

  • Photo Friday: The Shrinking Patagonian Icefield

    Typically obscured by cloud cover and mist, it is difficult to study the glaciers of the Southern Patagonian Icefield from space. However, on April 29, May 1, and May 24, 2016, NASA satellites captured clear images of the glaciers. Compiled into striking mosaics, this data reveals a great deal about the shrinking icefield. For example,…