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Photo Friday: Inside Glacier Caves

Posted by on May 26, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images, Tourism | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Inside Glacier Caves

Spread the News:ShareCaves can form within glaciers as a result of water running through or under a glacier. They are often called ice caves, but the term more accurately describes caves in bedrock that contain ice throughout the year. Water usually forms on the glacier’s surface through melting, before flowing down a moulin (vertical to nearly vertical shafts within glaciers or ice sheets) to the base of the glacier. Glacier caves can also form as a result of geothermal heat from hotsprings or volcanic vents beneath glaciers, such as the Kverkfjöll glacier cave in Vatnajökull glacier in Iceland, or where glaciers meet a body of water, with wave action. Glacier caves can collapse or disappear because of glacier retreat. For example, the Paradise Ice Caves on Mount Rainier in Washington had 8.23 miles of passages in 1978. However, it collapsed in the 1990s, and the section of the glacier that contained the caves retreated between 2004 and 2006. Prior to collapse, caves can be used to access the interior of glaciers for research purposes, with the study of glacier caves sometimes known as glaciospeleology. Others also serve as popular tourist attractions due to their beauty.           Sandy Glacier Caves, Mount Hood, Oregon, CA – Photograph via Josh Hydeman pic.twitter.com/hWEPMllbqS — Life on Earth (@planetepics) January 31, 2016 Read about a time when Putin visited a glacier cave here. Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Aleutian Islands from the Sky, Sea and Space

Posted by on May 19, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Aleutian Islands from the Sky, Sea and Space

Spread the News:ShareThis week’s Photo Friday explores the Aleutian Islands in Alaska. The Aleutian Islands, which separate the Bering Sea from the Pacific Ocean, consist of a series of islands and islets that contain 40 active and 17 inactive volcanoes. These volcanic islands formed from the subduction of the Pacific tectonic plate beneath the North American tectonic plate, and some of the volcanoes are glaciated. Scientists have determined that many of the islands had glaciers at one period. The Aleutian Islands are also part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge (AMNWR), which protects various seabird colonies. As the largest wildlife refuge in the United States, more seabirds nest on the islands than anywhere else in North America. Puffins, gulls, cormorants, cackling geese, and terns, among others, call the area home. See pictures of some of these birds and the Aleutian Islands from the air,  land, and sea below.           Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Peder Balke’s Mountain Landscapes

Posted by on May 12, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Peder Balke’s Mountain Landscapes

Spread the News:SharePeder Balke (1804 – 1887) is often known as the “Painter of Northern Light.” A painter firmly rooted in the Romanticism movement, which flourished from 1800 to the 1860s, his landscapes and seascapes portray the power and majesty of nature. His work depicts the wildness of Norwegian seascapes and the potential nature has to destroy. Balke’s talent has recently been rediscovered by collectors and museums alike. A collection of his work is on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City until July 9, some of the paintings featuring depictions of glaciers.         Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Glacier-Themed Parties

Posted by on May 5, 2017 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Featured Posts, Images | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Glacier-Themed Parties

Spread the News:ShareGlacier-themed parties have been around for a long time, but recently got a boost from the hit Disney movie, Frozen. And in Iceland last year, the first-ever party inside a glacier was thrown during the Secret Solstice festival in Rejkavik. The party was held inside Langjökull glacier, the second largest glacier in Europe. In today’s Photo Friday, we’ll show you some ideas for glacier-themed parties.                 Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Bizarre Glacier Sports

Posted by on Apr 28, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images, Sports | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Bizarre Glacier Sports

Spread the News:ShareAs climate change continues to impact world glaciers, adventure athletes are taking sports to an extreme at famous glacial settings. Ever heard of glacier boarding, for example? It’s just one of the bizarre sports now being played at glaciers near you. As GlacierHub reported in 2014, canyon guides Claude-Alain Gailland and Gilles Janin took boogie boards to Altesch glacier in Switzerland, coasting through a freezing channel carved into the ice. If that doesn’t look like fun, in 2007, Kealii Mamala invented another new sport: glacier surfing. He became the first person to surf a wave caused by a calving glacier at Alaska’s Childs Glacier. Even the world’s most prominent athletes are participating in the new sporting trend. In 2013, tennis superstars Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokoviche played an exhibition match at the Perito Moreno Glacier in Argentina. While, in reality, the match took place on a man-made court on a nearby barge, we’re pretty sure it’s the closest a game of tennis has ever been to a glacier. This Photo Friday, enjoy images of some bizarre glacier sports.                 Spread the...

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Photo Friday: Glaciers in Films

Posted by on Apr 21, 2017 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Featured Posts, Images | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Glaciers in Films

Spread the News:ShareMagnificent, beautiful and mysterious, glaciers are a critical part of nature. For thousands years, humans have responded to glaciers through art, incorporating them in paintings, poems, folk songs, and more recently, movies. With the development of modern arts, specifically the film industry, glaciers have popped up in a range of creative endeavors from documentaries to animated pictures. Explore some popular films featuring glaciers with GlacierHub.   Chasing Ice Chasing Ice (2012) is the story of one man’s quest to gather evidence of climate change. A documentary film about environmental photographer James Balog, it tells the story of his trip to the Arctic to capture images to help tell the story of Earth’s changing climate. The film included scenes from a glacier calving event lasting 75 minutes at Jakobshavn Glacier in Greenland, the longest calving event ever captured on film. “Battling untested technology in subzero conditions, he comes face to face with his own mortality,” the film introduction states. “It takes years for Balog to see the fruits of his labor. His hauntingly beautiful videos compress years into seconds and capture ancient mountains of ice in motion as they disappear at a breathtaking rate.”     Ice Age Ice Age (2002) is one of the most popular animations in the world and its sequels have continued to delight thousands of children and adults. First directed by Chris Wedge and produced by Blue Sky Studios, the film is set during the ice age. The characters in the film must migrate due to the coming winters. These animals, including a mammoth family, a sloth Sid, and a saber-tooth tiger Diego, live on glaciers. They find a human baby and set out to return the baby. The animation won positive reviews and awards, making it a successful film about glaciers.       James Bond Jökulsárlón, an unearthly glacial lagoon in Iceland, makes its appearance in several James Bonds films, including A View to Kill (1985) and Die Another Day (2002). A View to Kill, starring Roger Moore, Christopher Walken and Tanya Roberts, was also filmed on location at other glaciers in Iceland, including Vatnajökull Glacier in Vatnajökull, Austurland, Iceland.     China: Between Clouds and Dreams The documentary China: Beyond Clouds and Dreams (2016) is an award-winning new series by Director Phil Agland. The five-part series tells intimate human stories of China’s relationship with nature and the environment as the country grapples with the reality of global warming and ecological collapse. See the trailer here. Commissioned by China Central Television and filmed over three years, the film includes a scene of glaciers on the Tibetan Plateau, where the impacts of climate change are most obvious.         Spread the...

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