Category / All Posts / Featured Posts / Images / Science

    Loading posts...
  • Photo Friday: Island Glaciers of the Canadian Arctic

    Outside of Greenland, a quarter of the Arctic’s ice lies in Canada, much of it covering the Queen Elizabeth Islands. A recent paper in Environmental Research Letters found that, during the decade between 2005 and 2015, surface melt from the ice caps and glaciers of the Queen Elizabeth Islands increased by a staggering 900 percent,…

  • Glacier Peaks as Symbols of Peace

    Glacier peaks stand high and visible above areas of dense human population. To many people, they appear calm and serene, and in this way offer a vision of peace. Today, on International Day of Peace, celebrate the glaciers with us, recognizing the place the environment holds in our shared humanity.              …

  • Lessons in Collaboration from the Tanana Watershed

    This story is Part I of a two-part series on the Tanana River Watershed. See Part II here. What do a St. Patty’s Day party and a sub-Arctic river have in common? An abundance of green dye, which acts as a festive element for the first and a scientific tool for the second. A group…

  • Town Evacuates After Part of Swiss Glacier Collapses

    On Saturday, September 9, part of the Trift glacier in the Swiss Alps broke off and crashed into a glacier below it. About 220 people of Saas-Grund, a small nearby ski town, evacuated the area as a precaution, said local police spokesman Simon Bumann. The collapsed piece measured approximately 500,000 cubic meters. Local authorities who had been…

  • Roundup: Bowdoin Glacier, Floods, and Bacterial Populations

    Speeding-up of the Bowdoin Glacier From People Publications: “Glaciers are subject to sudden ice flow speed-up events in response to rapid increase of meltwater in the subglacial hydrological network after a prolonged warm period or the drainage of a supraglacial lake…. lasting a few hours, a period too short to be captured by satellite remote…

  • Photo Friday: Along the Karakoram

    Known to many as the “roof of the world,” the Pamir Mountains are spread over one of the world’s most glaciated regions, cutting across parts of Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Afghanistan and China. It is a region dominated by curtains of clouds, rocks, glacier ice, and snow, as well as pastoralists and their sheep. Muztagh Ata, which translates directly…

  • Narwhals in Scoresby Sound

    A version of this post originally appeared on narwhals2017.com. It has been lightly edited and republished with permission by the researchers of the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources (Pinngortitaleriffik). In 2010, Mads Peter Heide-Jørgensen and his colleague Hans Christian Schmidt discovered that Hjørnedal in Scoresby Sound in the Greenland Sea was an ideal place for the live capturing of…

  • Life, Death and Predation on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Mention the Greenland Ice Sheet, and chances are that you conjure up the image of a barren, white wilderness, dominated by ice and devoid of life. In fact, the ice sheet and its coastal outlet glaciers support thousands of small pools that teem with bacteria and animals. “A world of microbes exists in these tiny,…

  • Climate Change Through a Camera Lens

    The impacts of climate change on glaciers and other landscapes are often hard to conceptualize, making it difficult for scientists to convey the urgency of these changes to the general public. This difficulty is being addressed by photographers like Danish artist Carston Egevang and American Diane Tuft, who are taking action through visual image to…

  • Roundup: Dust, Collapse, and Fire

    Dust Distribution in East Asia From Journal of Meteorological Research: “East Asian dust (EAD) exerts considerable impacts on the energy balance and climate/climate change of the earth system through its influence on solar and terrestrial radiation, cloud properties, and precipitation efficiency. Providing an accurate description of the life cycle and climate effects of EAD is…