Education

A Cryosphere Tour at the American Museum of Natural History

Posted by on Aug 9, 2017 in All Posts, Classroom Hub, Education, Featured Posts | 0 comments

A Cryosphere Tour at the American Museum of Natural History

Spread the News:ShareGlacierHub editor Ben Orlove recently led a cryosphere-centered tour of exhibits at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) for 20 female students from high schools in the New York City area. The tour was part of the Brown Scholars program at the AMNH. This program, called BridgeUp:Science, brings female students with interests in science and computers to the museum, where they take classes in programming, databases and data visualization. It offers sessions during the school year and over the summer. Students who complete BridgeUp can apply for internships at the museum. Orlove has recently begun a position as research associate in the division of anthropology at the AMNH, and will be spending time there during his upcoming sabbatical. As Yvonne de la Peña and Louise Crowley, the director and associate director of BridgeUp, explained to Orlove, the program began in 2014 with a $7.5 million grant from the Helen Gurley Brown Trust to the AMNH. In addition to the Brown Scholars program, the grant supports three or four women each year as Helen Fellows; they are advanced students from university science, computer science and entrepreneurship programs who work closely with BridgeUp. The Brown Scholars and Helen Fellows work with AMNH educators in a middle school after-school program for girls and boys in grades six through eight, drawing students from underserved New York schools and giving them exposure to STEM fields. Louise Crowley explained the Brown Scholars program to GlacierHub. She said, “The Brown Scholars program differs from the multitude of programs that aim to teach computer programming, as our students have the opportunity to engage with museum research scientists, utilize current datasets and work on algorithms to answer some of the scientific questions being studied in this building. Moreover, behind-the-scenes tours of museum collections and scientist-led tours of exhibits engage these students enormously.” This video presents the Brown Scholars program: Orlove’s tour on 17 July was designed to show students the range of research across the divisions of the museum and to present climate to them. It began in the Hall of Planet Earth, where the students examined an ice core from Greenland. Along with Orlove and the students, de la Peña, Crowley, and two Helen Fellows, Lillie Schachter and Abby Mayer, took part in the tour. They broke into four groups, each of which examined a different section of the core. The groups measured the thickest and thinnest annual year in their section and reported back, allowing the students to discuss climate variability and data records. Orlove spoke briefly about melting in the Greenland Ice Sheet, linking it to sea-level rise. The tour continued to the Hall of North American Mammals. At the east end, the students broke into four groups again, each looking at a different diorama— bighorn sheep, dall sheep, mountain goats and musk oxen— in which glaciers are displayed. They noted that the dioramas all depicted summer and fall conditions, when there was still snow to replenish the glaciers. Orlove indicated that in the decades the landscapes were recorded to produce these dioramas, the glaciers have retreated significantly. At the west end of the Hall of North American Mammals, the tour focused on the diorama of the Alaska brown bear, set at Canoe Bay on the Alaska Peninsula. The students noted different components of this diorama: the high glaciated peaks in the background, the river that runs down from the peaks, a salmon caught by one of the two bears, and the bears themselves, one on all fours approaching the salmon, the other, further back, reared up on its hind legs. They put these elements together:...

Read More