Posts by Souvik Chatterjee

Sting’s New Music Video Highlights Climate Change

Posted by on Mar 1, 2017 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Featured Posts, News | 0 comments

Sting’s New Music Video Highlights Climate Change

Spread the News:ShareSting released a new music video in January for his song “One Fine Day,” which highlights challenges caused by climate change. The song warns humans of the dangers we pose to the planet, including melting polar ice caps, animals losing their ecosystems and changes in weather cycles. Sting is currently on tour to promote his new album “57th & 9th,” named for the intersection where his studio is located in New York City. As he travels, he is spreading awareness about climate change through his lyrics and has featured the song at recent concerts in Denver, New Orleans, Kansas City and Oklahoma City. Great: the legendary Sting dedicates a 🎶 song on his new album to climate change 🌎 https://t.co/ZM5fpeZCu5 called "One Fine Day" thank you! pic.twitter.com/4Q2qJ02QIR — Paulette van Ommen (@PaulettevOmmen) February 11, 2017 In “One Fine Day,” Sting outlines problems due to climate change and implores world leaders to take action. “Dear leaders, please do something quick,” sings Sting, while cartoon leaders in the music video play a game tug-of-war with Earth in the middle. The music video was made through rotoscoping, a process in which animated pictures are overlaid on live action pictures. The colorful video shows a half-animated Sting performing while depictions of nature surround him like bodies of water, trees and birds. Snippets of the lyrics are also shown and are represented by stunning animation.   The video also shows some of the effects of climate change on glaciers, including a depiction of penguins and a polar bear on a floating iceberg. The song references the Northwest Passage which includes Devon Island, the largest uninhabited island in the world. It is home to the Devon Ice Cap, a feature with an area of 15,000 km² and a volume of 3,980 km3. From 1960 to 2000, the ice cap has decreased by 600 km² or 4 percent with the Belcher glacier calving up to 40 percent of the total volume in the icecap. “Today the North West Passage just got found, Three penguins and a bear got drowned, The ice they lived on disappeared, Seems things are worse than some had feared,” sings Sting. Sting performed the song on his “57th & 9th” tour which kicked off in Canada last month. Here's a glimpse into our live version of "One Fine Day" on the #57thAnd9thTour. Login as a member to https://t.co/lIZBY9M9oX to watch. pic.twitter.com/dErPWGblfN — Sting (@OfficialSting) March 3, 2017 Sting’s fan club page on Facebook provides additional details. It reports that the video was directed by James Larese and “pays homage to Sting’s 1985 single and video for ‘Love Is the Seventh Wave,’ featured on his debut solo album ‘The Dream of the Blue Turtles.’” “It’s about searching and traveling, the road, that pull of the unknown,” Sting said about the new songs. “On this album, we ended up with something that’s energetic and noisy, but also thoughtful.” In “One Fine Day,” Sting grows ideological over whether climate change exists, “Apologists say, The weather’s just a cycle we can’t change. Scientists say, We’ve pushed those cycles way beyond.” Just like the balcony on which I wrote most of my album "57th & 9th" only much warmer! #Oscars https://t.co/s7utqnSVad pic.twitter.com/IhOXIkvqeA — Sting (@OfficialSting) February 27, 2017 “‘One Fine Day’ is my satire about climate skeptics,” Sting told ABC. “I sincerely and passionately hope that they are right and that the majority of scientists in the related fields of research are all full of baloney, and for that…perhaps we’ll all be grateful…one fine day!”  Sting, who is 65 years old, won the international Polar Music Prize in January for his work during his...

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When Lava Hits Ice in Russia’s Far East

Posted by on Feb 15, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, News, Science | 0 comments

When Lava Hits Ice in Russia’s Far East

Spread the News:ShareThe Kamchatka Peninsula in Far East Russia is an isolated region known for its glacier-volcano interactions that can lead to powerful natural disasters— and also, visually stunning images when lava impacts ice. One of these volcanoes, Sheveluch, has been erupting in recent weeks, creating local hazards. The volcano’s ash cloud, for one, threatens to disrupt air traffic in the region. In total, Kamchatka is home to 160 volcanoes, 29 of which are currently active. These volcanoes— six of which are designated UNESCO World Heritage sites— are tall and far enough north to harbor glaciers. As such, they are associated with lahars, devastating mudslides down the slopes of a volcano triggered by an eruption and melting glaciers. These mudslides move quickly, destroying most of the structures in their path. Explosive-effusive #eruption of 2016 (April to October)#volcano #Klyuchevskoy 08/21/2016Photo: Vladimir Voychuk pic.twitter.com/5wOhpyVg1s — Войчук Владимир (@voy4uk) January 26, 2017 Avachinsky is one active volcano in the region that is covered in glaciers, placing the surrounding region at a greater risk for lahars. Avachinsky is classified as a stratovolcano, which is a volcano that has been built up by alternate layers of lava and ash. It is the volcano closest to the state capital Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky.  “The Avachinsky volcano is glacierized, and the melting of ice poses a serious lahar threat the next time the volcano is active,” Ben Edwards, a volcanologist and professor at Dickinson College, warns. Edwards explained to GlacierHub that there are many deposits mapped out that are indicative of past lahars. Previous lahars in the Kamchatka Peninsula have been devastating with high human death tolls. The Nevado del Ruiz volcano in Colombia, for example, erupted in 1985, producing a lahar that killed 23,000 people. “They are incredible forces of nature and also brutally destructive and deadly,” said Janine Krippner, a PhD candidate in volcanology and remote sensing at the University of Pittsburgh, in an interview with GlacierHub. The Klyuchevskaya Sopka stratovolcano is the highest mountain on the peninsula and the highest active volcano in Eurasia. In November 2016 and more recently in January, the volcano spewed ash six kilometers above sea level. Such an ash cloud can disrupt international travel. Klyuchevskaya has produced notable lahars in the past including one particularly damaging one in 1993, according to Edwards. The position of a glacier on a volcano can influence the risk of a lahar.  However, there is still much research needed on past lahars at Klyuchevskaya to better understand risk, notes Edwards. “Many volcanoes have glaciers up high, but those close to Klyuchevskaya are on the western lower flank,” explained Edwards. “There have probably been some interactions and definitely lahars generated from historic flows. But these eruptions have not been well documented.” Higher regions, which tend to be cooler and moister, are more likely to form glaciers. Sheveluch Peak is a very active volcano, and the largest on the peninsula at 1,300 cubic kilometers in volume. Many glacier-volcano interactions have occurred at the location, releasing great quantities of steam and creating fantastic imagery for photographers. Similar volcano-snow interactions also take place elsewhere on the peninsula, especially during the winter, according to Edwards. “We saw spectacular examples during the 2012-13 Tolbachik eruption,” he said. The World Heritage website, which features several of the Kamchatka Peninsula volcanoes, makes special note of the “dynamic landscape of great beauty” created by the interplay of active volcanoes and glacier forms. In addition, the peninsula has a wide diversity of species including brown bears, sea otters and the world’s largest variety of salmon fish. It is also known for a wide variety of birds from falcons to eagles that are attracted to the...

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Photo Friday: Forest Fires Rage on Glacier-Covered Peaks in Chile

Posted by on Feb 10, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images, News | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Forest Fires Rage on Glacier-Covered Peaks in Chile

Spread the News:ShareChile is experiencing the worst forest fires in the country’s history after years of drought.  The fires are currently spanning roughly 104,800 hectares or 400 square miles, burning mountains that also harbor glaciers. For example, Mount Llaima, located in Conguillio National Park in the Andes, is covered in glaciers and caught up in the fires. Mitigation efforts have been underway with water-bombing aircraft being supplied by the United States. While ash and soot have been deposited on the glaciers, winds have directed debris away from areas where glaciers are predominant. See images from Chile’s catastrophic fires. 4,000+ have lost their homes in #Chile's worst forest fire. #LatAm Ambassadors are raising funds to rebuild them https://t.co/xuOx2bwLDt pic.twitter.com/pDftplHjAc — One Young World (@OneYoungWorld) February 6, 2017                     Chilean forest fire experts show #EUCivPro specialists helicopter response of the #wildfires in Maule region, #Chile https://t.co/8dAz0fFxBd pic.twitter.com/EdLNYOYNpy — EU Humanitarian Aid (@eu_echo) February 3, 2017 Spread the...

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Malia Obama Visits Andean Glaciers

Posted by on Feb 1, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Images, News, Tourism | 0 comments

Malia Obama Visits Andean Glaciers

Spread the News:ShareMalia Obama, the eldest daughter of former President Barack Obama, recently visited the glaciers of Peru and Bolivia during a gap year before entering Harvard as an undergraduate this fall. Her guides were unaware they were traveling with the president’s daughter during the 83-day journey, although they were told that an important American dignitary was accompanying them. Malia traveled with the Colorado-based educational travel company Where There Be Dragons, along with 16 other young people, through the Andes and Amazon program. 🇺🇸🇧🇴#MaliaObama visitó #Bolivia en el marco de“un programa académico previo a la universidad ➡️ https://t.co/g7wCJdtXK3 pic.twitter.com/qaWOthkUht — Conclusión (@ConclusionRos) January 20, 2017 Photos from the trip were later shared across social media. One image shows Malia in Bolivia’s Cordillera Real mountain range, which is part of the Andes. The mountain range, made mostly of granite, lies southeast of Lake Titicaca and east of La Paz, acting as a barrier between the Altiplano Plateau and the Amazon Rain Forest. The region is dense with glaciers because air from the nearby Amazon lowlands is very moist and contributes to glacier formation. The Cordillera Real also includes the iconic mountain Huayna Potosí, which is only fifteen miles north of La Paz and can be seen from the neighboring city, El Alto. It is the most visited mountain in Bolivia and is popular among climbers. Malia promised to return to Bolivia one day to climb Huayna Potosí. The Zongo Glacier located on Huayna Potosí is larger than most glaciers in the Cordillera Real but is rapidly melting. In 2013, it had an area of 1.876 km² with a catchment (where snow and ice are added and removed) of 3.3 km². The glacier has shrunk significantly from 1994 to 2014, losing 7 meters of thickness and retreating by 220 meters from a nearby lake, according to an analysis done through Google Earth images. Glaciers remain an important water resource for people in the region. The people of Bolivia are already feeling the impacts of climate change. Last November, Bolivia declared a state of emergency due to the worst drought in 25 years. Two glaciers on the mountain Tuni Condoriri that provide water for the cities of El Alto and La Paz have receded by about 40% from 1983 to 2006, at a rate of .24 km² a year. They typically provide an estimated 10% to 15% of the water for El Alto and La Paz, according to updated figures provided by Dirk Hoffmann, coordinator of the Bolivian Mountain Institute and an expert on climate change. The water is also necessary for the health of agriculture, ecosystems and hydroelectric plants in the region. “The trip has given Malia a first-hand view of Bolivian glaciers,” Hoffmann reported to GlacierHub. “I just hope someone told her how the glaciers are getting smaller and smaller each year. What has taken thousands of years to grow – the Andean glaciers – is being lost in a lifetime.” As a security measure, satellites tracked the group’s movement and 10 marines stayed within 50 meters. Eduardo Quispe,who works as a mountain guide at the company Bolivian Mountain Guides and described Malia’s trip to GlacierHub, said that the group took a five-day tour of the Eastern Cordillera Oriental, starting from Laguna Kothia, a glacier lake, and ending at the base of Huayna Potosi. The group reached heights between 4,850 meters to 5,100 meters. One Marine fell ill from altitude sickness and had to be carted back by mule. During the tour, Malia fished for trout in a lagoon, ate traditional South American foods like chuño (which consists of freeze dried potatoes) and drank coca tea....

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Toxic Minerals in Tibetan Glacier Meltwater

Posted by on Jan 18, 2017 in All Posts, Featured Posts, News | 1 comment

Toxic Minerals in Tibetan Glacier Meltwater

Spread the News:ShareHigher concentrations of toxic minerals have recently been found in glacial meltwater in the Tibetan Plateau region and are raising health concerns. Meltwater has eroded rock which is newly exposed due to glacier retreat, releasing hazardous amounts of iron, lead and other minerals into streams and rivers. A recent paper in the Journal of Hydrology authored by Xiangying Li et al. presents evidence recorded in 2013 of tainted meltwater from Dongkemadi Glacier in central Tibet. According to Voa News, climate research indicates that the Tibetan Plateau has been warming since the 1980s. The mass of ice in Tibet is the largest anywhere on Earth outside of the polar regions, and the plateau is increasing in temperature four times faster than the rest of the planet. Some of the meltwater, which has increased due to warming temperatures, deposits into the Yangtze, Mekong, Yellow and Indus rivers. Tibetan glaciers are estimated to hold 14.5% of the world’s glacier mass. It’s also estimated that 247 square kilometers of glaciers disappear annually, with a total of 18% of glaciers having disappeared since the 1950s. The Dongkemadi Glacier, which the researchers analyzed, is located in central Tibet and has an area of 15.89 km² and a maximum elevation of 5,275 meters. To reach their findings, researchers took samples from the meltwater of the Dongkemadi Glacier and found bicarbonate and calcium were dominant ions, followed by magnesium, sodium and sulfate. Other minerals also included  iron, strontium, boron, aluminum, barium and lithium. Most of these elements are transported while they are in the dissolved phase, while carbonates may be absorbed by solids and remain highly mobile. Other chemicals were found to be at a level deemed insignificant, below the threshold of 1 μg/l (micrograms per liter).  Katherine Alfredo, a research scientist at Columbia University’s Water Center, who spoke with GlacierHub about the research, said, “The results of the article, that glacial retreat can expose rock and lead to new weathering and contamination, are totally plausible. The methods of sampling and analysis are sound.” Compared to meltwater from the Haut Glacier d’Arolla in Switzerland, which the researchers used as a benchmark for average glacial meltwater hydrochemistry, concentrations of sodium, calcium, magnesium, chlorine, bicarbonate, lithium, strontium and barium were higher in the Tibetan Plateau. This discrepancy may be due to a higher abundance of carbonates like calcite, which more heavily influences the meltwater’s chemistry in the Tibetan Plateau than compared to the Haut Glacier d’Arolla. This suggests that the Tibetan Plateau has higher chemical weathering than other glacial water networks, with a higher amount of chemicals potentially discharged into the water system in Tibet.  The high concentrations of metals such as iron, lead, nickel, chromium, arsenic, copper and aluminum found in the meltwater can have significant negative impacts on human health and the environment. For example, lead exposure is known to cause impaired physical and mental developments, nickel exposure can cause kidney failure or birth defects, and aluminum exposure can increase chances of Alzheimer’s disease. The highest iron concentrations found by the researchers exceeded the Environmental Protection Agency’s guidelines, while concentrations of aluminium, zinc and lead are currently close to the guideline values.  Monitoring of the Tibetan Plateau’s glacier meltwater for hazardous concentrations of minerals is important to public health and the environment. However, data is limited because long-term observance of hydrochemistry can be costly and isn’t typically included in glacial monitoring programs. As climate change continues to melt the glaciers and increase rock exposure, more chemicals will be deposited into the water system in Tibet, posing risks to health. Seeing how significant the effects have already been, it is important to continue monitoring glaciers, even if...

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