Posts by Greg Dietz

Polar Ecology in Flux Due to Climate Change

Posted by on Jul 20, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Science | 0 comments

Polar Ecology in Flux Due to Climate Change

Spread the News:ShareGlacial melting and rising ocean temperatures are affecting the feeding, breeding and dispersion patterns of species, such as krill, cod, seals and  polar bears, in the polar regions, according to two recently published research articles. This climatic shift could create an imbalance in the regional ecology and negatively impact numerous species as the effects of climate change worsen. The first article reflects on how a threat to a key species in Antarctica may shake up the food chain, while the other considers how a changing habitat in the Arctic could skew the population trends of several interconnected species and create a systemic imbalance in the ecosystem. After a nine-year study of krill in Potters Cove, a small section of King George Island off the coast of Antarctica, a team of South American and European marine biologists published their research this past June in the scientific journal Nature. Krill are shrimp-like sea creatures that feed mostly on plankton.  Since they extract their food from the water by filtering it through fine combs, they are known as filter feeders.  Krill are found in all oceans and are an abundant food source for many marine organisms.  In the polar regions, predators such as whales often rely on krill as their only consistent food source. The authors of this first piece found that a destruction of the krill population could extend undermine the Antarctic food web that relies on the presence of the small creatures.  The study launched after stacks of dead krill washed ashore at Potters Cove in 2002, lining the coast. The article’s nine authors, Verónica Fuentes, Gastón Alurralde, Bettina Meyer, Gastón E. Aguirre, Antonio Canepa, Anne-Cathrin Wölfl, H. Christian Hass, Gabriela N. Williams and Irene R. Schloss, suggest the first observed  and subsequent stranding incidents are connected to large volumes of particulate matter dumped into the ocean by melting glaciers. The high level of tiny rock particles carried by the glacial melt water may have clogged the digestive system of filter feeders like krill. The researchers conducted a series of experiments in which they exposed captive krill to water with varying amounts of particulates. The krill’s feeding, nutrient absorption and general performance were all significantly inhibited after 24 hours of exposure to concentrations of particles similar to those found in the plums of glacial runoff. Although krill are mobile creatures and can usually avoid harmful environments, exposure to the highly concentrated particles interfered with their ability to absorb nutrients from their food.  The krill became weak, which resulted in their inability to fight local ocean currents and their subsequent demise. About 90 percent of King George Island is covered in glaciers that are melting and discharging particles into the surrounding marine ecosystem, according to the article.  Similarly, an overwhelming majority of the 244 glacier fronts, a location where a glacier meets the sea, studied on the West Antarctic Peninsula have retreated over the last several decades, which suggests that high particulate count from glacial meltwater may be occurring in other parts of Antarctica. Since much of the Antarctic coast is not monitored and most dead krill sink to the bottom of the ocean, the authors caution that these stranding events likely represent a small fraction of the episodes.   In another recent study on climate change’s impacts on wildlife, scientific researchers with the Norwegian Polar Institute focus their attention on the high Arctic archipelago of Svalbard, Norway.  They found that glacial melting and changes in sea ice have impacted numerous land and sea animals in the Arctic. These shifts have the potential to influence more creatures. The study, by Sebastien Descamps and his coauthors, was published this May in...

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Roundup: Changing Waterways, Hotter Parks, Glacier Music

Posted by on Jul 18, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Roundup | 0 comments

Roundup: Changing Waterways, Hotter Parks, Glacier Music

Spread the News:ShareAs a Glacier Retreats a Major Water Source Dries Up From CBC News: “It’s [the Kaskawulsh glacier] been the main source of water into Yukon’s Kluane Lake for centuries, but now the Slims River has suddenly slimmed down — to nothing. ‘What folks have noticed this spring is that it’s essentially dried up,’ said Jeff Bond of the Yukon Geological Survey. ‘That’s the first time that’s happened, as far as we know, in the last 350 years.’ What’s happened is some basic glacier hydrology, Bond says — essentially, the Kaskawulsh Glacier has retreated to the point where its melt water is now going in a completely different direction, away from the Slims Valley.” Check out he full story here.   Rising Temperatures in National Parks Like Glacier Bay From Climate Central: “With such a wide variety of climates across the park system, the country’s 59 National Parks all have different challenges to manage in the changing climate. Some parks have experienced dramatic temperature changes, and these shifts can lead to water shortages (or too much water), ocean acidification, and species migration…. Glacier National Park — The number of glaciers has been cut in half since 1968, and the largest glaciers are expected to be gone within the next 15 years.” Look at temperature trends in national parks here.   Hosted by Greenpeace: Professional Pianist Plays on Glacier From Greenpeacespain on YouTube: “Through his music, acclaimed Italian composer and pianist Ludovico Einaudi has added his voice to those of eight million people from across the world demanding protection for the Arctic. Einaudi performed one of his own compositions on a floating platform in the middle of the Ocean, against the backdrop of the Wahlenbergbreen glacier (in Svalbard, Norway).” Spread the...

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Ice Cold Beer: Icebergs Take New Form at Brewery

Posted by on Jul 14, 2016 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Communities, Experiences, Featured Posts | 0 comments

Ice Cold Beer: Icebergs Take New Form at Brewery

Spread the News:ShareThere are four basic ingredients in beer: grain, hops, yeast and water.  Brewers routinely experiment with barley and wheat to distinguish their products in their competitive, creative field.  In Canada, one brewery uses one especially unexpected product to create a natural, pure taste: icebergs. The St. John’s, Newfoundland-based Quidi Vidi Brewing (QV) is capturing media attention for its beer that is brewed with the water from 25,000-year-old icebergs. This past month a reporter from Vice’s Munchies toured the operations and sampled the “clean, crisp refreshing North-American style lager.” The company, the largest craft brewery in Newfoundland, also held brewing tours in July. David Fong and David Rees, both engineers in the offshore oil industry, founded QV in 1996.  The two men converted an old seafood plant into a full-fledged brewery.  Not long after their start, the same year an iceberg drifted up the harbor that sheltered QV, the brewery brought their Iceberg Beer to market.  In March of 2011, QV changed the Iceberg bottle to the dark blue it is today. After 10,000 to 25,000 years of formation on glaciers in Greenland, the calved icebergs drift southwest on ocean currents and then are harvested off the eastern coast of Canada.  The natural preservation and delivery of the pre-industrial water ensures that it is some of the purest in the world, the brewers have said.   As QV brewer Les Perry told Munchies,“This is what water should taste like. This could be anything up to 25,000 years old…. By the time it [the iceberg] gets to Newfoundland, it’s shrunk in size, so we’re getting closer to the core, made thousands of years ago, long before we had any contaminants.” Ed Kean, one of the few men licensed to harvest seaborne glacial ice, supplies QV with icebergs.  Every summer Kean heads up the coast of eastern Canada to an area known as “Iceberg Alley.”  There, according to an interview between Kean and Canadian news talk show Breakfast Television, he harvests approximately 1.5 million liters of iceberg water to satisfy his buyers. They include QV, a winery and the Newfoundlander distillery Iceberg Vodka. In a conversation with GlacierHub, Kean said it takes him and his crew of six roughly four to six weeks to get a full harvest of iceberg water. Kean says demand for iceberg water is growing at roughly 10 percent each year. Obtaining a reliable supply of iceberg water for a commercial product seems no easy task, but Iceberg Vodka’s Brand Marketing Lead, Rachel Starkman, said differently in an email to GlacierHub: “Because there are a limited number of harvesting licenses available and Mother Nature has continued to bless us with fruitful harvests each year, acquiring iceberg water has not posed any difficulties.” Despite legal disputes between the two founders that began in February of 2014, Quidi Vidi continues to produce its flagship Iceberg Beer and maintains a strong local following. QV did not respond to GlacierHub’s request for comment on its Iceberg Beer by time of publication. “QV has been in operation for 20 years and they have fought long and hard to gain their customers…. Right now they are in the middle of some challenges but all of their fans are hoping they clear soon and Quidi Vidi will be free to stretch their legs and start brewing new beers in line with many other craft breweries,” said Newfoundlander and beer critic Mike Buhler. Buhler, aka “Beerthief,” and his wine connoisseur partner, Tom Beckett, founded the NL (Newfoundland) Artisanal and Craft Beer Club in 2012 and then in 2014 began writing a beer blog for the St. John’s daily newspaper, The Telegram....

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Walk through the Glacial History that Shaped New York City

Posted by on Jul 7, 2016 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Experiences, Featured Posts | 0 comments

Walk through the Glacial History that Shaped New York City

Spread the News:ShareNew York City is often referred to as the concrete jungle.  However, a few hundred years ago this artificial forest was an actual forest, and 20,000 years ago Manhattan was covered in hundreds of feet of glacial ice.  The city’s natural history has shaped our modern landscape. Understanding that urban connection to the natural world was the purpose of CALL WALK, a recently held environmental education walking tour in Manhattan, New York. CALL WALK was created in affiliation with City as Living Laboratory (CALL), a non-profit organization dedicated to spreading environmental awareness through artwork and tours that show how modern life has been defined by the natural world. The organization recently released a new video capturing the walking tour. The tour was presented in conjunction with a two day conference hosted by Columbia University, Ice Cubed: An Inquiry into the Aesthetics, History, and Science of Ice.  The conference explored the use of ice as medium to express concerns over global warming artistically as well as academically. CALL’s artistic director, Mary Miss, founded the the non-profit  in 2009 with a mission stated on CALL’s website to, “Increase awareness and action around environmental challenges through the arts.”  Miss’ work with CALL is a continuation of over four decades of projects that she has completed in cities all across the country.  These include 2007’s Connect the Dots in Boulder, Colorado, where she created a citywide map of the changing waterways. Recently, Miss and her staff of four have designed several art installations and WALKS that call public attention to the link between natural and man-made systems.  CALL WALK was an extension of a current project, BROADWAY: 1000 Steps (B/CALL) Anthropologist Ben Orlove, also founder and editor of GlacierHub, lead the CALL WALK along with and poet and artist  Marshall Reese.  The artist is known for his work with ice sculptures with which he uses melting ice that has been fashioned into keywords as social commentary. He and his collaborator Nora Ligorano will bring large ice sculptures of the words “The American Dream” to the Republican and Democratic conventions in Cleveland and Philadelphia later this month, where they will melt and disappear. Along the way, the two guides and their geology expert, Mike Kaplan of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, commented on remnants of the mighty glacier that covered Manhattan during the last ice age. “He [Kaplan] pointed out some glacier erratics in Riverside Park, pieces of rock from the Palisades, the cliffs on the other side of the Hudson. He showed that they could have been transported by the ice sheets back in the last Ice Age,” Orlove said in an interview following the mid-April CALL WALK. “I was surprised because I have visited the park many times, but I had never stopped to look closely at those boulders and to wonder where they came from.” Connecting the present to the undiscovered past in our backyards is what makes events such as CALL WALK and B/CALL intriguing and important. “Through exploration of the Broadway corridor, viewers will become aware that nature is everywhere and in action at all times, that the city is an urban ecosystem, that innumerable numbers of small decisions over time have shaped the environment we inhabit today and that our decisions today (behavioral choices) will impact the future of all of nature,” said CALL manager Christine Sandoval. Participants followed a bygone creek that now manifests as a puddle that forms in the subway, or as a patch of moss in Riverside Park.  They were also led to touch smoothed bedrock and massive boulders transported by ancient glaciers that melted and produced...

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Photo Friday: Designing an Art Park for a Greenland Fjord

Posted by on Jun 24, 2016 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Featured Posts, Images | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Designing an Art Park for a Greenland Fjord

Spread the News:ShareTalented artists and architects competed for the honor of designing the new Icefjord Centre in Ilulissat, Greenland.   The Danish architectural group Dorte Mandrup Arkitekter  presented an elegantly curving building design which won the competition.  However, another one of the finalists, the entry by Studio Other Spaces, founded by artist Olafur Eliasson and architect Sebastian Behmann, was nothing short of spectacular itself.     Studio Other Spaces says, “The Ilulissat Icefjord Park uses the melting of ice to shape space. Studio Other Spaces has created a unique design strategy where ice is at once the formwork of a concrete structure and the focal point of the resulting space. For the Ilulissat Icefjord Park, Studio Other Spaces uses naturally calved icebergs harvested directly from the nearby ice fjord to create an exhibition building, called the Ice Void, which harbours in its walls the memory of the ice that was used to shape it. Together with the Ice Void, and linked to it outdoors by a 360-degree path, the Sun Cone building defines the Icefjord Park. The light glass structure of the Sun Cone positions the visitor centre directly in the landscape and offers guests a spectacular panoramic view of the surroundings and the Arctic sun. The park helps make the overwhelming experience of visiting the ice fjord comprehensible – providing visitors with a scale for contemplating and relating to the awe-inspiring ice fjord.”       In 2004, 4000 square kilometers of the Ilulissat Icefjord was declared a Word Heritage site because of its unique geology and natural beauty. Spread the...

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