Posts by Christina Langone

Roundup: Bacteria Are Doing Well; Zooplankton, Dams Are Not

Posted by on Apr 11, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, News, Roundup | 2 comments

Roundup: Bacteria Are Doing Well; Zooplankton, Dams Are Not

Spread the News:ShareEach week, we highlight three stories from the forefront of glacier news. Project Forecasts India’s Hydrological Future in a Changing Climate From Earth & Space Science News: “The Indian subcontinent is particularly vulnerable to climate change because of its diversified socioeconomic and climatic conditions. Changes in monsoon variability and glacier melt may lead to droughts over the Indian plains as well as extreme rains and abrupt floods in the neighboring Himalayas…Through our work with the NORINDIA project, we found that there is a risk of 50% glacier melt in the Beas River basin, which covers northwest India and northeast Pakistan, by 2050.” Learn more about NORINDIA and its work in India.   Chilly Conditions No Match for Methane-cycling Microorganisms From FEMS Microbiology Ecology: “Alpine belt soils harbored significantly more methane-cyclers than ––those of the nival belt, indicating some influence of plant cover. Our results show that methanogens are capable of persisting in high-alpine cold soils and might help to understand future changes of these environments caused by climate warming.” What are the implications of this study? Find out here.   Preliminary Study Looks at Relationship Between Glacial Lakes and Zooplankton From Polish Journal of Environmental Studies: “Zooplankton communities can be affected by glacial influence. In marine environments zooplankton mortality, mainly associated with the chemical properties of the ice, has been found in areas close to ice fields.” Find out which characteristic of glacial lakes is affecting zooplankton. Spread the...

Read More

Photo Friday: Jade Dragon Snow Mountain

Posted by on Mar 25, 2016 in Featured Posts, Images, Tourism, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Jade Dragon Snow Mountain

Spread the News:ShareJade Dragon Snow Mountain, in southern China’s Yunnan province, is known for its beauty and for the many tourists that flock there yearly. But the glaciers that top this mountain range may not be around for much longer. A Chinese info site stated in 2010 that four of the 19 glaciers on Jade Dragon have already disappeared. The mountain’s location at the edge of the Tibetan plateau may be contributing to the accelerated melting since the plateau’s glaciers are generally melting faster than other low-lying ones. This decline is of utmost importance since much of China depends on glacial run off for their water supply. Experience the beauty of the Jade Dragon Snow Mountain and its dwindling glaciers in the slideshow below.   chensiyuan, GFDL, /Wikimedia Commons © CEphoto, Uwe Aranas / CC-BY-SA-3.0/Wikimedia Commons Andrew Brown/Flickr 2936767971_c44774aa61_o Laurence & Annie/Flickr Laurence and Annie/Flickr Spread the...

Read More

Could Glaciology Use a Dose of Feminism?

Posted by on Mar 22, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, News, Science | 0 comments

Could Glaciology Use a Dose of Feminism?

Spread the News:ShareA new study in Progress in Human Geography argues that the viewpoints of women and indigenous people are not being represented in glaciology and that a feminist perspective is needed to counterbalance this deficit. The authors—Mark Carey, M Jackson, Alessandro Antonello, and Jaclyn Rushing of the University of Oregon—are calling for a reimagining of what constitutes appropriate and usable knowledge in the natural sciences, especially glaciology. They argue that valuable perspectives are left out of glaciology because its history is steeped in military operations, as well as the fact that there is a current interest in risky fieldwork. The inclusion of marginalized viewpoints will allow for a more complete representation of glaciers, science, and climate change, they assert. The study has garnered a great deal of attention for its provocative premise. Comments, blog posts, and articles have piled up since the study was published in January. Articles have mockingly called glaciers sexist or complained that the federal government wasted taxpayer dollars funding this study. This research was funded by a grant awarded to Mark Carey by the National Science Foundation, who addressed criticism with a response that pointed out that only a small fraction of the grant went to this study. Them’s fightin’ words: ‘Feminist glaciology’ instigates culture war: https://t.co/Pz8YD5HlMd — Soc_Stud_Sci (@Soc_Stud_Sci) March 13, 2016 The researchers found, after a thorough literature review, that the exclusion of women and indigenous people’s knowledge comes, in part, from a tradition of glaciers and the military. For example, during the Cold War, the United States viewed the Arctic as an area of strategic concern and began to prepare for military operations in the region. The importance of learning how to survive and maneuver in those harsh Arctic areas provided “institutional resources, growth, standing, and credibility,” for glaciology, the authors argue. Thus, with the militarized history, the authors say that glaciology was influenced by colonialism, domination, and Western ideals that often ignore women and indigenous peoples. This history may have affected what is currently considered respected forms of glaciology. The authors say that though there are various ways to study glaciers (like modeling, experiments, and satellites), the one that garners the most attention— and therefore funding and validity— is traditionally-masculine fieldwork. Glaciologist Garry Clarke told GlacierHub in an email that he finds this type of “[a]dventure ‘Rambo’ glaciology,” along with other points brought forth in the study, “embarrassing to most glacier scientists.” Even so, researchers working within harsh glacial conditions are often considered heroes. The authors argue that when prominent publications feature stories that focus more on the adventure, rather than the science, of glaciology, they perpetuate the validation of risk. Lead author Mark Carey said their aim was to provide a broad perspective on the field, rather than critique individuals or their activities. “Note that we are talking about how broader sociocultural values influence the reception and perception of science, not about individual scientists and whether their science is valuable or solid, which is not the point,” Carey said in an interview with Science. The authors concluded that risk-taking fieldwork in the sciences not only often excludes women, but also those who cannot afford to become mountaineers. By only validating physically-demanding activities by affluent researchers, glaciology loses key knowledge that could advance the field. Glaciologist Elisabeth Isaksson of the Norwegian Polar Institute told GlacierHub in an email that she may have “rolled her eyes” at this paper a few years ago, but upon further reflection and discussions with her peers she has come to realize the importance of a study like this one. “Being a somewhat older female glaciologist I do think it...

Read More

Zaria Forman’s Quest to Capture Ice as Art Before It’s Gone

Posted by on Mar 1, 2016 in All Posts, Art/Culture, Featured Posts, Images, Interviews | 0 comments

Zaria Forman’s Quest to Capture Ice as Art Before It’s Gone

Spread the News:ShareZaria Forman is taking pastel drawings to a whole new level by creating photo-realist drawings of areas susceptible to climate change. She believes that artists have a special responsibility to showcase the effects of our changing climate, and has dedicated her work to doing just that. Her paintings capture lighting and depth so convincingly that a viewer cannot help but feel an overwhelming connection to these faraway places. While some of her work focuses on glaciers, she also captures the beauty of Hawaii, Israel, and the Maldives–areas affected by sea-level rise. Her work can be seen in exhibits around the world, including the upcoming Pulse Fair in NYC in March and the Seattle Art Fair in August. Her next solo exhibit will be at Winston Wächter Fine Art’s Seattle location, in February and March of 2017. Forman, with inspiration from her late mother’s photography and her childhood travels, melds her personal and artistic sides mesmerizingly into her drawings. She hopes the innate beauty of the areas she captures will compel her audience to act to slow the loss she is documenting. Her work allows us to step back from the science of climate change and experience the loss, and the beauty, of these iconic and critical regions on a more human scale. GH: What are you trying to communicate with your artwork? ZF: I hope my drawings can facilitate a deeper understanding of the climate crisis, helping us find meaning and optimism in shifting landscapes. One of the many gifts my mother gave me was the ability to focus on the positive, rather than dwell in the negative. I hope my drawings serve as records of landscapes in flux, documenting the transition, and inspiring our global community to take action for the future. GH: What role does art play in the conversation about climate change? ZF: Artists play a critical role in communicating climate change, which is arguably the most important challenge we face as a global community. I have dedicated my career to translating and illuminating scientists’ warnings and statistics with an accessible medium, one that moves us in a way that statistics may not.  Neuroscience tells us that humans take action and make decisions based on emotion above all else. Studies have shown that art can impact our emotions more effectively than a scary news report. My drawings explore moments of transition, turbulence, and tranquility in the landscape, allowing viewers to emotionally connect with a place they may never have the chance to visit. I choose to convey the beauty as opposed to the devastation of threatened places. If people can experience the sublimity of these landscapes, perhaps they will be inspired to protect and preserve them.   GH: What in your life has inspired this coupling of the arts and climate? ZF: The inspiration for my drawings began in my early childhood when I traveled with my family throughout several of the world’s most remote landscapes, which became the subject of my mother’s fine art photography. I developed an appreciation for the beauty and vastness of the ever-changing sky and sea. I loved watching a far-off storm on the western desert plains; the monsoon rains of southern India; and the cold arctic light illuminating Greenland’s waters. I have very fond memories of our family trips and consider them a vital part of my upbringing and education. I feel very fortunate that I had the opportunity to see so much of the world, and to learn first-hand about cultures so vastly different from my own. This myriad of experiences instilled in me a love and need...

Read More

Roundup: Hockey, Daredevil Tourists, Microbial Diets

Posted by on Feb 29, 2016 in All Posts, Featured Posts, Roundup, Uncategorized | 1 comment

Roundup: Hockey, Daredevil Tourists, Microbial Diets

Spread the News:ShareEach week, we highlight three stories from the forefront of glacier news. Hockey Warms Up Village in Kyrgyzstan From Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty: “In the mountains of northern Kyrgyzstan, winters can be long and cold. So people in the tiny village of Kenesh have come up with a healthy way to keep active and fit. Each day, almost all of the villagers lace up their skates, and grab a stick to play ice hockey.” Watch the video to find out more about this unique practice. Tourists on Frozen Lagoons Test Limits of Safety From Iceland Magazine: “Tour guides and visitors at Jökulsárlón glacial lagoon in South East Iceland watched in shock and disbelief as a large group of people had managed to get themselves near the centre of the lagoon by jumping between ice floats and walking on the frozen lagoon.” Read more about the risks involved. Poor Diet Limits Microbial Growth on Debris-Covered Glaciers From Soil Biology and Biochemistry: “Photosynthetic microbial communities are important to the functioning of early successional ecosystems, but we know very little about the factors that limit the growth of these communities, especially in remote glacial and periglacial environments. The goal of the present study was to gain insight into the degree to which nutrients limit the growth of photosynthetic microbes in sediments from the surface of the Toklat Glacier in central Alaska.” Read more about how nutrient availability is affecting life on glaciers. Spread the...

Read More